KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


HARVEY COUNTY, Part 18

[TOC] [part 19] [part 17] [Cutler's History]

LAKIN TOWNSHIP.

W. C. ARMSTRONG, farmer, Section 6, P. O. Halstead, owns 155 acres; 100 in cultivation; south line hedged, and small orchard; dwelling 12 x 18 with l 12 x 16; granary 18 x 26; stable and sheds 12 x 52. Wheat average for 1882 was twenty-eight bushels per acres. Has four horses, sixteen head of cattle and thirteen hogs. Came to Kansas in 1873 and located on present farm. Was born in Perry County, Pa., February 3, 1835 and moved to Ohio in 1859 and in 1860 to Wayne County, Ind. Enlisted in 1861, in Company D, Eighth Indiana Infantry, and was with his command in the campaign in Missouri and participated in a number of engagements there and at Pea Ridge, Ark., and the siege of Vicksburg after which went to the department of Gulf and was in the Red River expedition and was sent from New Orleans via sea to Washington, D. C. and reported to Gen. Sheridan in the Valley and was mustered out at Winchester, September 5, 1864, and returned home and came from there to Kansas. Was married May 13, 1865, to Miss Fannie Bold, a native of England. They have five children -- Harmon L., Seth R., Reuben I., Frederick W., and Ellen C. Is a member of the Christian Church and a Mason. Has been Township Clerk for two terms, and Director of School Board two terms and was a member of the board for distribution of aid in the grasshopper year and lived on corn meal, rye coffee and buffalo rather than accept aid.

P. BLOUGH, farmer, section 10, P. O. Halstead, owns 160 acres, all in cultivation, all enclosed and divided into forty acres lots with good hedge fencing. One of the forty acre lots is again subdivided into four fields. Has five acres of fine orchard protected by good wind breaks; has a good new frame dwelling 18 x 32, two stories high with l 16 x 24, one story, with porches on two sides, at a cost of $1,500; barn and sheds 24 x 32 and other out buildings; has three mules, two horses, twelve head of cattle and seven hogs. Raised 3,000 bushels of wheat in 1882 from 120 acres. Came to Kansas in 1878 and located here. He was born in Indiana, April 15, 1842, and lived there until 1861, when he enlisted in Company H. Forty-fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteers and with his command participated in the engagements of Fort Donelson; Shiloh, Stone River and Chickamauga. He veternized in 1864 and was appointed Sergeant and his command stationed at Chattanooga until mustered out in September, 1865, when he returned to his home in Indiana and came from there to Kansas. He was married October 18, 1867, to Miss Louisa Kline, a native of Ohio. They have seven children -- Charles, Margaret A., George, Ida B., Alice, Mary E. and Henry. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Church Trustee and Road Master.

REUBEN DREESE, farmer, Section 7, P. O. Halstead, owns 160 acres; 150 under cultivation, small orchard and grove. Dwelling 12 x 14, L 9 x 12; stable 14 x 12; granary 12 x 14 and buggy shed, 9 x 12. Raised in 1882, 103 acres of wheat with a yield of 2, 540 bushels. Has three horses, one cow and six hogs. He was born in Pennsylvania April 4, 18555 and came from his native place to Kansas in the spring of 1878 and located here. Mr. Dreese is a practical farmer.

FREDERICK M. FEIN, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Halstead, owns 160 acres; seventy-five in cultivation, all enclosed with hedge ad one acre in orchard; small grove of mulberry trees; dwelling 12 x 24; barn 32 x 44; granary 8 x 24; stock yard and sheds; has twelve horses and twenty-one head of cattle. His wheat crop for 1882 averaged thirty bushels per acre. Came to Kansas in 1874 and bought and located here. Was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, October 6, 1839, and followed vintaging. In 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Tenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with his command was sent to West Virginia and participated in the engagements at Carnifax Ferry. After which they were sent to Kentucky and engaged in the battle of Perryville. Afterwards they occupied the position of guards for the army headquarters until mustered out in 1864, when he went home and came to Illinois in 1867 and from there to Kansas. Was married October 5, 1871, to Miss Caroline Mueller, a native of Germany. They have three children -- Cornelius F., Fredolin W. and Melinda L. He is a member of the German Methodist Church and has been Road Master.

GEORGE H. HARROUN, farmer, Section 16, P. O. Halstead, owns 240 acres, 130 in cultivation, a good orchard. Dwelling 16 x 24; stable, granary, stock pens, shed, etc. Has six horses, twenty-three head of cattle and ten hogs. Was born in the State of New York, October 24, 1842, and moved to Illinois in 1856; came from there to Kansas in February, 1877, and located on present farm. Was married in November, 1865, to Miss Catherine Maxwell, a native of New York. They have six children -- William H., Edna, Alvin L., Alexander, Ida and Kate. His wife and two eldest children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ADAM HESS, farmer, Section 17, P. O. Halstead, owns 160 acres; 85 in cultivation, partially hedged; orchard of 50 apple trees and 100 peach; dwelling 16 x 24, granary 14 x 16, stable 14 x 16 with shed 8 x 16. Has four horses and 6 milch cows. Born in Illinois, March 4, 1852 and came from native place to Kansas in 1879 and located on his present place, then raw prairie. Was married, February 29,1880 to Miss Kate Lentz, a native of Illinois. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

CONRAD HOLDEMAN, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Halstead, was born in Indiana, December 21, 1861, and came to Kansas with his parents who are natives of Pennsylvania, in September, 1873, and located in McPherson County, where they now reside. In 1881 he came to Harvey County and has been making his home since with Mr. Jacob Dyck on Section 14, Lakin Township.

PETER HOOPS, farmer, Section 5, P. O. Halstead, owns 320 acres, 138 in cultivation and the rest in grass; small orchard and dwelling 14 x 26, L 12 x 14, stable 20 x 38, granary 12 x 18. In 1882 he raised 1,900 bushels of wheat from 72 acres. Was born in Hanover, Germany, December 1, 1853 and came to the United States when seventeen years of age and located in New York City and engaged in the grocery business and came from there to Kansas in 1877 and located here. Was married March 24, 1875, to Miss Catherine D. Meyer, a native of Hanover; they have one child -- John P. Is a member of the German Methodist Church.

GEO. S. MILLER, farmer, Section 2, P. O. Halstead, rents and farms 180 acres, 145 in cultivation, 3 acres bearing orchard, with a good frame dwelling and all necessary outbuildings for general farming. Has 3 horses, 4 milch cows and 8 hogs. His wheat crop for 1882 averaged 20 bushels per acre. Was born in Iowa July 6, 1834. His parents were the pioneers of that section, having emigrated there from Indiana in 1840. When the war broke out in 1861 was in Missouri and organized in the State Militia and subject to call when required and participated in a great many skirmishes with the guerrillas, among other the fights at Athens and Etna; and after the war resided in Missouri until coming to Kansas in September, 1873, first locating in Highland Township and came to this place in 1881. Was married February 16, 1865, to Miss Mary Cooper, a native of Indiana; they have three children -- Charley C., Carrie C., and Mary M. Has been a member of the School Board several terms.

J. E. SCHMITT, farmer, Section 11, P. O. Halstead, owns 320 acres, 230 in cultivation, 1 mile hedge planted and a small orchard; dwelling 24 x 21, one and a half stories; stable 16 x 32, granary 20 x 32. General farming. Raised in 1882, 85 acres in wheat, which averaged 28 bushels per acre. Has 9 horses, 12 head of cattle and 9 hogs. Was born in Bavaria, January 24, 1846, and came to the United States in 1852, and located in Lee County, Iowa; and in 1857, removed to Illinois and remained there until coming to Kansas in 1879, locating on this place. Was married October 15, 1876, to Miss Lizzie M. Baer, a native of Illinois, they have three children -- Selma, Katie B., and Susie L. Is a member of the Mennonite Church.

B. THOMPSON, farmer, Section 4, P. O. Halstead, owns 240 acres, 180 in cultivation, forty acres pasture and all enclosed, except west side, three acres in bearing orchard and forty acres cultivated timber, dwelling 14 x 24, L 12 x 10, barn 44 x 26. In 1882, he raised eighty acres of wheat, at an average of twenty-six bushels per acre, has eight horses and twenty-three head of cattle. Was born in Indiana, September 24, 1831. Moved to Iowa with his parents when only six years old and came from there to Kansas in April, 1871, located here at a time a raw prairie and very few persons in this locality. Was one of the first Board of Commissioners elected in Harvey County and the first Postmaster in Lakin Township and in 1873 and 1874 was Justice of the Peace and had been a member of the School Board. Was married April 11, 1858, to Miss Elizabeth Grant, a native of Indiana. They have one son -- Clarence E. Is a member of the Christian Church.

LEE R. WRIGHT, farmer, Section 8, P. O. Halstead, owns 160 acres, eight under cultivation, with good frame dwelling 12 x 28 and outbuildings. Raised in 1882, twenty-three acres of wheat which averaged per acre over twenty bushels. Came to Kansas and located on his present place March 22, 1871, among the first to locate in his township. He was born in the State of New York, September 6, 1821, and in 1858, moved to Illinois, lived there when the war broke out. In 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Seventy-sixth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served with his command in the Western Army, participating in the engagements of Champion Hill, Black River, and the siege of Vicksburg and then to Meridan, Miss., where he was severely wounded in the head and leg and was sent to the hospital, and after recovering was sent home and mustered out, March 6, 1865. After the war he remained in Illinois until 1868 when he moved to Iowa and came from there to Kansas. Is a member of the G. A. R.

C. H. YEOMANS, farmer, Section 8, P. O. Halstead, owns 320 acres, 190 acres cultivated, 160 enclosed with hedge and three acres in orchard, dwelling 20 x 24, barn and granary 14 x 20. Has lately turned his attention to the raising of fine stock, has now thirty-eight head. He was born in Ohio, August 3, 1849, and entered the army in the spring of 1864 as a drummer boy in Company G, One Hundred and Seventy-first Ohio National Guards for 100 days, and for a short time was stationed at Johnson's Island, guarding prisoners and was then ordered to Cynthiana, Ky., where with his command and other troops, they were captured by John Morgan, after a sharp fight, June 9, 1864, but Morgan being pressed very closely by Gen. Burtridges, all the prisoners were paroled and released just at the time the rear guard was having a heavy engagement with the Federal advance., from there they went back to Camp Dennison, Ohio where a great many of his command died of wounds, received in the fight and from there the regiment was sent back to Johnson's Island and remained until being mustered out on August 20, 1864. In the spring of 1865, he went to Boston and got a position in a store, and in the fall shipped on the ship Vermont, Capt. Higgins, in the South America trade, and made a trip from there to Rio and Calao, Peru, and to the Chinchi Islands to bring on a cargo of guano and returned via Cape Horn and were blown over near the coast of Africa and were 110 days out of sight of land, finally landed at Cowes, in the Isle of Wright, and were ordered to Rotterdam, where they discharged cargo. Having enough of sea life he returned home via London, Liverpool and Portland, Me. In the fall of 1869, he went to Missouri and engaged in railroad life until 1871, when he returned to Ohio and from there to Kansas, locating here March 27, 1871, where he has made his home, although he has spent several years in hunting buffalo and other game on the western plains and in the pan handle of Texas, and while there was also engaged in surveying and had a great many narrow escapes from the Indians, who on one occasion killed seven of their party. He married December 15, 1875, Mrs. Mary Ferguson, a native of New York state. They have three children -- Blanch, Chauncy and Irene. Is a member of the Christian Church and the G. A. R. Was the first Constable appointed in the township and has held the office a number of terms and occupies the position at present and has been Treasurer of the School Board.

LAKE TOWNSHIP.

IKE S. ELDER, farmer, section 20, P. O. Burrton, owns 320 acres, 110 in cultivation and 160 fenced with post and wire. Good orchard, five acres cultivated timber, dwelling 16 x 28,barn 16 x 24, and stock yards, sheds, etc.; wind mill pump. Makes stock a specialty; has 125 head domestic cattle. Was born in Pennsylvania, June 12, 1836, and moved to Henry County, Ill in the spring of 1856 and in the same year came to Kansas to organize a Pony Express to Santa Fe from Westport, Mo., but the Indians being very hostile, abandoned the project, and located in Wisconsin. In 1861, he went back to Wisconsin, and enlisted in Company G, Nineteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and went with his command to Missouri and participated in a number of skirmishes and the battle of Wilson's Creek, and was discharged for disability the same year. In 1862 he obtained a recruiting commission and commenced recruiting and drilling for the Twentieth Wisconsin Regiment at Camp Rundall, Wisconsin and when the Indians broke out in Minnesota was ordered to take his recruits and go into the Indian country to suppress the rising and went as far as New Ulm. After his return was mustered in the Thirtieth Wisconsin Regiment, Company F, and was made duty Sergeant before the regiment left camp and went with his regiment into Dakota, and was stationed at different posts. After the battle of Nashville, was commissioned as Second Lieutenant of Company H., Fifty-second Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers and went home to recruit but failed to get mustered and returned to his old regiment then at Louisville, Ky and participated in the engagement at Nashville and was mustered out October 9, 1865, and returned to Pepin Co. Wis. In the fall of 1868, he raised a company of volunteers and went with Gov. Crawford after the Indians and was with Gen, Custer when the white women, Mrs. Morgan and Miss White were captured and was discharged in May, 1869. Was wounded in Kentucky in 1865 at the capture of Sue Monday. In the fall of 1869 came to Wichita and located there and served as juryman on the first jury convened in the county and was the first Constable elected in Sedgwick County, and was appointed first Deputy Sheriff in Sedgwick County and married August 21, 1870, on the first license issued in Sedgwick county to Miss Lucy Dunlap, a native of Illinois. They have four children -- Bessie, William H., Minnie R., James O. Came to his present farm January 17, 1872, and is post commander of G. A. R. in Burton and past master of the A. O. U. W.

JONATHAN MCMURRY, farmer, section 32, P. O. Burrton, owns 160 acres, ninety in cultivation, dwelling 16 x 20, and makes a specialty of keeping fine milch cows and selling cream to creamery. Was born in Pennsylvania, July 20, 1840, and in 1849 moved with his parents to Illinois and in 1861 enlisted in Company G., Forty-sixth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Col. John A. Davis, and participated in the engagements at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, siege of Corinth and Big Hatchie; in the latter engagement he was very badly wounded, being shot through both thighs, disabling him entirely from active life, rendering one of his feet partially paralyzed and while in the hospital had to fight the doctor off with his crutch to prevent him from cutting off his leg, and was discharged for disability in 1863. In 1871 he came to Kansas and located his present homestead, but shortly after moved to Hutchison, Reno County and engaged in livery business and while there he was elected Justice of the Peace and served six years. He was also Under Sheriff of Reno County for four years and while in that capacity had a great deal of very dangerous duty to perform, arresting horse thieves and desperadoes. While Justice of the Peace, he studied law and was admitted to the bar, and commenced the practice of law, first in Hutchison and then located in Nickerson, but becoming dissatisfied, came to his farm in the fall of 1881, and has made it his home since. Was married December 10, 1867, to Miss Sarah J. Riddle, a native of Pennsylvania. They have six children -- Calude D., Harry L., Charley C., William A, Cora M. and Meda. Is a Mason, Knight Templar, and a member of the I. O. O. F. and the Encampment.

JAMES MCMURRY, farmer, section 32, P. O. Burrton, owns 320 acres, eight-five in cultivation, a small orchard and a large grove of cultivated timber, dwelling, 18 x 28, two stories; barn 20 x 60, with stock yards and sheds. Makes stock raising and feeding a specialty and has at present 175 head of graded and domestic cattle and 100 head of hogs. Was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., in 1817 and in 1849 moved to Illinois where he engaged in farming and raising stock, and came from there to Kansas in the spring of 1871, and located on his present farm as a homestead and was the first to locate in Lake Township. When he came here he had to haul the material for his house and improvements eighty miles. His nearest neighbor was fifteen miles, but in a few months others coming in, the country improved rapidly. After the organization of the township he was elected Justice of the Peace and occupied that position for three years and was for seven years a member of the School Board. Was married in 1839 to Miss Elizabeth Moore, a native of Somerset County, Pa. They have ten children -- Jonathan, Nancy, Chambers, George, Asher, Hartmen, Amos, Peter, Maggie and Melissa. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

THOMAS J. MATLOCK, farmer, Section 24, P. O. Burrton, owns 480 acres in this township, 100 in cultivation, with small orchard, five acres in cultivated timber, 160 acres fenced with barbed wire; dwelling 14 x 24, L 14 x 20, barn 17 x 38, with stock yards and sheds, and windmill pumps and large stock scales. He also owns 160 acres in Sedgwick County, with 100 acres in cultivation and dwelling 12 x 24. He makes a specialty of raising corn, cattle and hogs, and has at present 118 head of graded and domestic cattle and thirty hogs. Was born in Iowa in February, 1846, and made it his home until he enlisted in 1862 in Company E, Nineteenth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was with his command in Missouri for one year, then at the siege of Vicksburg and at Fordouch Bayou and at the battle of Prairie Grove. Was severely wounded by a gunshot through the leg and captured and kept a prisoner for ten months at Shreveport, La., and Fort Tyler and Marshal, Texas, where he was exchanged July 22, 1864, and returned to his command at New Orleans, La., and participated in the final engagements of the war at Goodes' Landing, siege of Spanish Fort and surrender of Mobile and saw the last gun of the rebellion fired by the confederacy and was mustered out July 10, 1865, and got his final discharge at Davenport, Iowa, July 25. After the war he returned to Iowa and came from there to Kansas in March, 1871, and homesteaded his present place March 13. Was married March 26, 1868, to Miss Mary J. Thompson, a native of Iowa. They have four children -- Lena, Nellie, George M, and Alice M. Mr. Matlock has always taken an active part in politics and educational matters and anything that tended to the welfare of his locality and has been a member of the School Board since the organization of the District and taught school for six consecutive winters and served as Township Trustee for three terms. When the question of voting bonds for another railroad was raised in the county in 1881, he took an active part against it, believing it was not to the interests of the farmers to have a heavy bonded debt hanging over the county, thereby creating a feeling in some localities which has been against him politically. He thinks this locality as good a country as can be found for combining farming with stock raising and has been very successful in his business.

JAMES M. PARKER, farmer, section 34, P. O. Burrton, owns 160 acres, 40 in cultivation; small orchard and 4 acres of cultivated timber; 80 acres fenced with barbed wire for pasturage and two miles of hedge; small frame dwelling, granary and corn cribs and stock yards and sheds and windmill pump. Makes stock raising a specialty; has 50 head of good cattle and 30 head of hogs. Came to Kansas in 1867 and located in Johnson County and came to his present place in July, 1871. Was born in Illinois in 1844 and when a child moved with his parents to Indiana and in 1863 enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment Indiana Cavalry and participated in a number of engagements in Mississippi and Missouri among them Guntown and Ivey hill and followed Price on his raid into Missouri and back into Arkansas and was mustered out in the fall of 1865 when he returned to Indiana and came from there to Kansas. Was married February 28, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth Wimp, a native of Kentucky. They have one child -- William. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and has served as Constable and Road Overseer.

JOHN W. SHIVE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 20, P. O. Burrton, owns 800 acres, 170 in cultivation, 320 fenced with barbed wire and 160 with hedge; a fine bearing orchard of 6 acres, with every variety of fruit as well as grapes and 5 acres with cultivated timber, with many of the desirable kinds of forest trees in a most thrifty state; small frame dwelling, stables, sheds for stock, windmill pump, etc. Makes stock a specialty and has 220 head of grades and 40 hogs. Came to Kansas August 1, 1871 and made his homestead entry of his present residence. Was born in Kentucky August 1, 1841, and in 1861 enlisted in Company K, Ninth Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and was with his command in the Department of the Tennessee and participated in a number of minor engagements and in the battles of Shiloh and Stone River; at the latter place he was severely wounded and unfitted for active service and was transferred to Second Battalion, V. R. C. After his recovery he was transferred to the Invalid Corps and was on duty in Louisville and New Albany during the balance of his term of service; and was discharged in December, 1864. After his discharge he went to school and fitted himself for school teaching and made that his occupation for a time, and when he first came to Kansas he taught school in the winter and improved his farm in the summer, until his farm interests became of such a magnitude that they occupied all his time. Was married November 27, 1878, to Miss Mary Byers, a native of Iowa. They have two children -- Joseph T. and Eads Ediston. Is a Mason and member of the Baptist Church and is now serving as Township Treasurer, Mr. S. thinks that all kinds of trees will grow in this locality and that after the ground has been cultivated a few years that the growth is much more rapid than when the soil is new. He has soft maples over one foot in diameter, nine year old and his fruit trees show a marvelous growth. He also thinks the future grass crop for stock will be the alfalfa and orchard grass as he thinks they will do well here.

IRA SAYLER, stock raiser and farmer, Section 14, P. O. Burrton owns 160 acres, 80 in cultivation, 6 acres in timber; small house, barn, stable, corn crib, stock yards, sheds, etc. Makes fine stock a specialty; has 48 head of cattle, 30 head of which are thoroughbreds and the rest fine grades. Also dealing in fine horses and sheep as well as hogs. Was born in Ohio in 1855 and came from native place to Kansas. Is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

FIELDON TAYLOR, farmer, Section 24, P. O. Burrton, owns 400 acres, 110 in cultivation, with dwelling and stable, stock yards, sheds, etc. Makes stock a specialty; has now seventy head of cattle and forty hogs. Came to Kansas in 1871 and located here. Was born in Indiana May 4, 1835, and moved to Iowa in 1858. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Nineteenth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and after participating in a number of engagements among them, siege of Vicksburg, Morganize, was wounded at the battle of Prairie Grove and captured and kept a prisoner of war for ten months at the prisons of Shreveport, La., and Fort Tyler and Marshal, Texas, and exchanged July 22, 1864, and returned to the command at New Orleans and engaged in the fight at Goodes' Landing, Spanish Fort and surrender of Mobile and saw the last shot fired by the Southern confederacy which was directed at their Brigade headquarters. After the war he returned to Iowa and came from there to Kansas. Was married March 5, 1857, to Miss Elizabeth Whittaker, a native of Indiana. They have seven children -- Hannah L., Mary E., Robert H., Ulysses S., Edna G., Charles H., and Alpha A. Mr. T. takes an active part in educational matters and is now Director and has held some position on School Board ever since the district was organized. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a life member of the Andersonville Survivors Association.

J. W. WILLIAMSON, farmer, Section 34, P. O. Mount Hope, Sedgwick County, owns 160 acres, forty-five cultivated; small orchard, dwelling 12 x 20, with l 14 x 14. Was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1839. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for one year. He joined his regiment at Bermuda Hundred, Va., and was in a number of skirmishes and on picket duty in front of Petersburg during the siege, and was mustered out in the fall of 1864. In 1872 he came to Kansas and located here and commenced improving his place. In 1873 he was elected trustee of Lake Township. When the grasshoppers ate up his crops in 1874 he went to Kansas city and worked at his trade of coopering and returned in 1875 and remained until 1877 when he went back to Ohio with the intention of probably remaining there but the country looked so different to him and was so unsatisfactory that after staying there eighteen months, he returned to Kansas and located in Wyandotte and remained until the spring of 1882 when he came to his place and now is satisfied to remain here. Was married in 1869 to Miss Sarah A. Johnston, a native of Indiana, they have two children -- Claude and Ralph. Mr. W. is a Mason and his wife a member of the Baptist Church.

J. P. WEST, farmer, Section 32, P. O. Burrton, own 160 acres, 60 in cultivation; forty acres fenced with barbed wire; an orchard of 200 trees; dwelling 24 x 30; granary 20 x 30; has twenty head of cattle. Came to Kansas and located here October 12, 1878. Born in the state of New York in 1838, and when fifteen years of age moved with his parents to Michigan. In 1861 he enlisted in the Fourth Michigan Light Artillery and was with his Battery with General Buell in Kentucky and reinforced Grant at the battle of Shiloh and at the siege of Corinth and in a number of minor engagements and was mustered out in 1863 and came from Michigan to Kansas. Was married February 22, 1870, to Miss Julia E. Taylor, a native of Wisconsin. They have two children -- Tillie J. and Willie W. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and has been a member of the School Board for two terms and is Township Clerk at the present time.

S. A. WOODWARD, farmer, Section 26, P. O. Burrton, owns 330 acres, 100 acres in cultivation; ten acres cultivated timber; 140 fenced with barbed wire and three-fourths mile of hedge; frame dwelling 14 x 14, L 10 x 18; barn 24 x 36, with stock yards and sheds and windmill pump. Has thirty-five head of cattle and twenty hogs. Came to Kansas in 1869 with a capital of but $20, and stopped in Butler County until the spring of 1872, when he located here. Was born in the state of New York, August 28, 1836, and made it his home until 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Forty-fourth Regiment New York Infantry, and with his command served in the army of the Potomac for about a year, but losing his health was discharged on a surgeon's certificate of disability in 1862. In 1863 he went to Illinois and to Kansas City, Mo., in 1866 and came from there to Kansas. Was married January 30, 1877, to Miss Mary Millington, a native of New York State. They have one child -- Dave. when the township was first organized Mr. W. served one term as Justice of the Peace and is at the present time Township Treasurer. Is a Freemason.

[TOC] [part 19] [part 17] [Cutler's History]