KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


REPUBLIC COUNTY, Part 16

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP.

A. B. BACHELOR, farmer, P. O. Crainville, was born in Macomb County, Mich., in 1849. In 1858, he emigrated to Hardin County, Iowa, where he lived until 1865; then emigrated to Colorado, remaining there three years. In 1868, he located in Brownville, Nebraska, and attended school until 1878, and then came to Kansas, locating in Republic County and took a homestead on Section 32, Township 1, Range 3. He has 100 acres under the plow, forty acres fenced for pasture, and twenty acres of hay land; has planted five acres of forest trees, 800 fruit trees, mostly peach; has a few apple and plum and cherry trees, besides small fruit of all kinds. He has one and one half miles of hedge, good well and wind-mill, good frame house and barn, and is engaged in raising stock; has fifteen head of cattle, five head of horses, seventy-five head of hogs, and usually has 100 to dispose of annually. He was elected County Commissioner in 1878 for a term of three years. He has served as Town Trustee for some time, and is now on his fourth term. He is one of the leading men in this part of the country, and well liked. He was married in 1873 in Liberty Township, to Miss Mattie James. They have two sons--Frank and Guy. Mr. Bochelor(sic)is a member of Belleville Lodge No. 129, A., F. & A. M.

G. M. CHlLDS, farmer P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Knox County, Ohio, in 1840, and was raised there until fourteen years of age, when he was left an orphan, and an uncle living in Genesee County, N. Y., took him home with him, where he remained until twenty-one years of age. In 1862, he enlisted in Company C., One Hundred and Fifty-first New York Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was Mustered out at Rochester, N. Y., in June, 1865. After coming out of the army, he emigrated to Iowa, locating at Grinnell, where he engaged in farming, remaining there until 1870, when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, where he took a homestead on Section 21, northwest quarter, and was among the first settlers in this part of the country. The township was not organized until after he came there. He began to improve his place, and in the spring of 1872 put up a frame house 14x16 feet, one of the best in the county at that time. He has improved his place by breaking 130 acres. He has one acre of forest, three acres of fruit, consisting of peach, apple, and small fruits of all kinds. He has added eighty acres to his homestead, and has twenty-five acres of this under plow, forty acres fenced for pasture, and the balance hay land; good house, stable and granary, and a good well with wind-mill; has turned his attention to stock-raising mostly. He has thirty head of cattle, seventy-five head of hogs, and usually has from fifty to sixty head to market each year. He is also engaged to some extent in butter making, their sales from eight cows amounting to $12.00 per month, this being about two-thirds of the amount made. Mr. Childs is one of the most enterprising men of his township, and is highly respected by all. He was married in 1866 in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa, to Miss Grace Kingdon, a native of New York State. They have been blessed with three children--Henry A., born in 1868; Clara L., born in October, 1878, Arthur K., born in 1882. Mr. Childs is a member of the Grange, and the Anti-Horse Thief Association.

D. CRAINE, farmer, P. O. Crainville, was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1826; was raised there on a farm until about nineteen years of age, then learned the blacksmiths' trade, and worked at this business through the Eastern States and Canada until 1861, when he enlisted in the New York Forty-ninth Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was mustered out at Buffalo, N. Y., in 1865; was taken prisoner near Spotsylvania Court House in 1863, and was taken to Andersonville, remaining there four months; from there was taken to Florence, where he was retained as a prisoner of war three months. When he was captured he weighed 174 pounds, and when he came out he weighed 100 pounds. The treatment he received while there has affected his eyes, which have troubled him more or less since. After coming out of the army, he located in Chautauqua County, N. Y., remaining there until he came to Kansas, in 1871, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 27, Township 1, Range 3; began to improve his place, and put up a little blacksmith shop, working at his trade a part of the time. In 1874, he put up a good stone shop, the best in this part of the county. Was elected the first treasurer in the township, and for two years the elections were held in his house. In 1878 he put up a building on his farm 14x24 feet, a story and a half, and used the first floor for a storeroom; put in a stock of general merchandise, and was in trade about four years, doing a good business until the railroad went through and a town was built up; has been an active man in everything which helped to build up and settle the county has a good farm of 200 acres, having added forty acres to the homestead. The place is well watered by Rose Creek, with about six acres of timber along its banks; has ninety acres under the plow, eight acres of pasture, the balance timber and hay land. He has planted about six acres of forest trees, consisting of walnut, butternut, ash and many others, besides some sugar maple and beach; has a good orchard of apple, peach, plum, cherry, etc., and some fine grape vines. He has been engaged in stock-raising a large share of the time since he came here; also owns eighty acres on Section 36, with a good frame house and twenty acres under cultivation. In 1878 he gathered the facts of the early settlement of Liberty Township for the history of Republic County, which Hon. I. O. Savage is preparing. Was married in 1851, to Miss Caroline Coal, of Erie County, N. Y. She was born in 1835, and was raised in Erie County. They have two children--Frederick and Grace.

ANDREW GLENN, farmer, P. O. Crainville, was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1840. Learned the stone cutters' trade, and went to Edinburgh, where he followed the business of stone-cutting, and thence to Manchester, England, and then back to Scotland, and in 1869, emigrated to the United States, locating in New York City, and remained there eighteen months, working at his trade. He then formed a colony of New York mechanics, consisting of eight, and then came to Kansas and located in Republic County, all taking homesteads in Liberty Township, reaching Kansas in the winter of 1870. They raised enough money among them to buy a yoke of oxen, and with this team drew stone and put up a little house, where they could stay until spring, when each one went out to work at his trade to earn enough to live on. Mr. Glenn went to work on the Kansas Pacific Railroad at his trade, receiving good wages, and in the fall was able to buy a team and commenced to improve his place, going out a while each summer to work at his trade. After the Chicago fire he went there and worked in the summer, receiving good wages, and soon after gave up his trade and devoted himself to his farm. His homestead is on Sections 26 and 27. He has sixty-five acres under the plow, and seventy acres of pasture. Rose Creek runs through the farm, furnishing plenty of living water for his stock with about forty acres of timber along the creek; has planted an acre of timber around his house; twenty-five apple trees and small fruits. He has sixteen head of cattle, ten horses, forty hogs, and deals exclusively in stock-raising. Was married in 1867 at Edinburgh, Scotland, to Miss Elizabeth Phamister, a native of the North of Scotland. They have four children--Jessie, Maggie, Marinia and Willie. Mrs. Glenn was the only woman who came out with the colony. Mr. Glenn is a member of Republic County Co-operative Association, and owns five shares in the same.

WILLIAM LARKINS, farmer, P. O. Crainville, was born in Bureau County, Ill., in 1837. Was raised in Marshall County, living there until 1854, then to Stark County, and engaged in farming; remained there until 1868, emigrated to Pawnee County, Neb., where he remained until 1871,then located in Republic County, Kan., and took a homestead on Sections 22 and 23, and has since added eighty acres on Sections 22 and 16, Township 1, Range 3. He has 200 acres under improvement, sixty acres of pasture, and sixty acres of hay land. The place is watered by Rose Creek, with from thirty to forty acres of timber along its banks. A good share of this timber is oak, and there are many other varieties, such as ash, walnut, hackberry, etc.; he has a good orchard of apple, peach, pear, plum trees, etc., besides grapes and small fruits. He has one and one-half miles of hedge, and is extensively engaged in raising stock. He has 100 head of hogs, raises three to four colts each year, and has twenty head of cattle. Mr. Larkins has been one of the most successful men in the county. He came here with very little means, and by close attention to business and hard work, he has a good commencement for a fortune, and is considered one of the most substantial men in the county. He was married in 1860, in Bureau County, Ill., to Miss M. J. Sturm, of Stark County. They have nine children--H. L., H. C., C. E., Winnie E., Marion G., Ethel A., Ernest, Rolph and Minnie E. He has 160 acres in Section 22, and 80 in 23, and 80 in 16, making 320 acres, or half a section, in all.

JOHN NESMITH, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb. Was born in Athens County, Ohio, in 1833. Was raised there, and learned the carpenters' trade, following this business until 1870, and then emigrated to Kansas and located in Doniphan County, remaining there two years, thence to Republic County and took a homestead on Section 28, Township 1, Range 3. He has 100 acres improved, 40 acres fenced for pasture, 4 acres of forest, 2 miles of hedge, 275 apple, 200 cherry, and 200 peach trees, besides grapes and other small fruits; two good wells, with windmill, and the place in good shape to produce crops. He is raising some stock. Has twelve head of cattle, and sixty head of hogs. Is a man well liked in his township, and has served two terms as Justice of the Peace; also Town Trustee and Assessor. He was married in 1855, to Miss Elvira Watkins, of Trimble, Athens Co., Ohio. They have five children--Lillie A., Hastings A., Joseph L., W. C., and Charles A. Mr. Nesmith has been a member of the Christian Church since 1849.

A. N. STINSON, farmer and merchant, P. O. Belleville. Was born in Crittenden County, Ky., in 1850. Was raised on the farm, and lived there until 1865, then emigrated to Iowa, located in Lucas County, remaining there about six years, and in the fall of 1871 he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and pre-empting 160 acres of land on Section 30, Township 2, Range 3. At the end of six months he proved up, and sold out, and took a homestead in Norton County, and remained there nearly three years. Then sold out and came back to Republic County, and took a timber claim on Section 21. Has planted fourteen acres of timber, 36,000 trees, and has 125 acres broken. The balance is pasture and hay land. In 1881 he put up a building 16x28 feet, and put in a stock of general merchandise, and has had a good trade. Is raising some stock, turns off from twenty-five to thirty-five head of hogs annually, and a few head of cattle; also raises a few fine horses. He is Justice of the Peace, and is among the leading men in the town. He was married in 1878 in Freedom Township, to Miss Martha Barrett.

J. M. VANCE, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb. Was born in Davis County, Iowa, in 1849. Soon after his parents moved to Illinois, locating in Mercer County, where he lived most of the time up to 1872, when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County while the country was wild and very few settlers in it. He took a homestead on Section 21 which he at once proceeded to improve. He put out three acres of timber, a good orchard of 100 cherry and 150 apple trees, besides small fruits. He has 160 rods of hedge, good frame house, 14x24 feet, and other improvements. Is raising come stock. Has seventy-five head of hogs, and usually markets from forty to fifty head per annum. He is considered one of the best farmers in the township. He has made all he has since he came to Kansas. He was married in 1873, in Republic County, to Miss Lillie Nesmith. They have three children--John, Violet, and Olive.

J. J. WILKES, farmer, P. O. Crainville. Was born in Stowonthewold, Gloucestershire, England, in 1837. Learned the stone-cutter's trade, and worked at this business until 1869, when he emigrated to America, locating in New York City, remaining one summer, working at his trade. In the winter of 1869 he joined the Excelsior colony, from New York City, consisting of eight mechanics, and emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 34, Township 1, Range 3. They were about the first settlers in Liberty Township, and the first winter put what little money he had into a collection to buy a team, so they could draw stone to put up a house the following spring. He went out to work at his trade every summer, for the first three or four years, and, in this way, made enough to live on and buy a team. Since this he has devoted his attention to his farm. He has a place on Rose Creek, which furnishes plenty of running water for his stock. There is plenty of timber for firewood on this creek. He has ninety acres under the plow, thirty-six acres fenced for pasture, thirty to thirty-five acres fenced for meadow, 300 fruit trees, of various kinds, and plenty of small fruits; good barn 33x40 feet, with large sheds attached. He has twenty head of cattle, fifty to seventy head of hogs, and some very fine colts. He is the present Justice of the Peace, this being his second term. He was married in 1863, to Miss Elizabeth Taylor, in Campden, Gloucestershire, England. They have five children--Charles E., George H., Horace, Albert, and A. J. He is a member of Republic County Co-operative Association, and is Secretary of the Anti-Horse Thief Association.

D. WILKIE farmer, P. O. Crainville. Was born in Wigan, Lancashire, England, in 1838. Was raised in Manchester, and learned the stone-cutter's trade, working at it there, and then went to Scotland, in 1859, remained two years and was employed on the new Cloister House of Commons, and the India office, and other government buildings; then went to London, where he remained six years. In 1869 he came to America, and located in New York City, and worked there a while at his trade, and then went to work on Yale College, and in 1870 came West, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 27, Township 1, Range 3. The place is well watered by Rose Creek, which furnishes plenty of living water for his stock. There is considerable timber along the creek. He has ninety acres under the plow, forty acres fenced for pasture, and the balance is meadow. He has a good orchard, and plenty of small fruit. He has eighteen head of cattle, and markets from forty to fifty head of hogs each year. He has a good frame house, and a good barn, 48x40 feet. In 1881, he was appointed postmaster of Crainville. Has been School Clerk. He was married in Manchester, England, in 1861, to Miss Helen Wilkie, who was born in Airdrie, Scotland, in 1838. They have four children--Helen M., Henry G., David J., and Maud B. Mr. Wilkie is a member of Republic County Co-operative Association.

NORWAY TOWNSHIP.

W. H. DAY, farmer and carpenter, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1839. In 1852 he emigrated to America and located in Richland County, Ohio, remaining there about nine years, and in 1861 he moved to Williams County, Ohio. In 1862 he enlisted in the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, serving one year and was discharged at Warrington Junction, Va., in 1863. After coming out of the army he located in Williams County and learned the engineers' trade, remaining there nine years; then located in McLain County and remained there until he came to Kansas in 1871, locating in Republic County. He and his brother were about the first settlers on the prairie in Lincoln Township, and at the time of his settlement was sixty miles from market or mill and endured many hardships during the first few years in the State. He took a homestead in Norway and Lincoln townships, eighty acres in each township; has seventy acres under the plow, forty acres of pasture, the balance being fine hay land. He has a nice little grove of forest trees, about 100 peach and thirty apple trees and a variety of small fruit, a good house 18x24 feet built of stone, barn 22x43 feet 14 feet posts, making a valuable place. He has quite a stock of cattle and hogs; also works some at the carpenters and wagonmakers' trade. Mr. Day is well pleased with his success here, as well he might be. He came here in debt and has settled up and owns his place and stock free of all incumbrance. He was married in 1863 to Miss Sarah Stinger of Williams County, Ohio; they were blessed with two children--John and Enos. Mrs. Day died in 1871. In April, 1873 Mr. Day was again married to Miss Maria Bennett of Lincoln Township, Republic County; they have three children--Alva, Alfred and Victor. Mr. Day is a member of the Farmers Alliance and is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and for a number of years was class-leader in the same.

HUGH McQUEEN, farmer, P. O. Scandia, was born in Tennessee in 1846, and was left an orphan at an early age and became a wanderer, and in 1861 when the war broke out, was at Little Rock, Ark., and enlisted in the Southern army and in 1862 was captured by the Third Iowa Cavalry and held by them about eighteen months although he had his freedom to go and come. When he got into the Union lines his views on the rights of the South to secede took a change, and when one of the boys went home on a furlough he went with him to Iowa and finding how people lived in the North, he became a Northern man and joined the Third Iowa Cavalry and served until the close of the war. When he came into the militia he could not read, and being anxious to learn, the soldiers volunteered to teach him and in a short time began to learn so that he could read the papers. From that time until now he has been a strong Union man. After the war he settled in Iowa and in 1870 emigrated to Kansas and took a homestead on Section 2, Township 4, Range 4. The place has some fine springs and there is a creek of running water, making a very desirable stock farm. He has sixty acres under the plow, the balance being used for hay and pasture; three acres of timber and a fine orchard along the creek and is raising a good many hogs. Has been doing well since he came here except the first five years when he had to go sixty miles to market. He was married in 1873 in Lincoln Township, Republic County, Kan., to Miss L. Skeels. They had three children--Annie M., William and Estella. His wife died in 1878. Married again, March, 1881, to Miss Emeline Nickson. They have one child--Ina. Mr. McQueen is a member of John Brown Post No. 44, G. A. R., Belleville, and of the Missionary Baptist Church.

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]