KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


REPUBLIC COUNTY, Part 15

[TOC] [part 16] [part 14] [Cutler's History]

ROSE CREEK TOWNSHIP.

J. L. ADAMS, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Erie County, Pa, in 1849. He was raised there and lived in that county, working on his father's farm, until he came to Kansas, in 1871. He located in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 22, Township 1, Range 2. He has eighty acres under the plow, and eighty acres in pasture; has about two acres in forest trees, 50 apple trees, also some peach trees and other fruits; 120 rods of hedge, a good house 24x16 feet, with an addition 16x18 feet. He has a stable and is working into the stock business. He has a small stock of cattle and twenty-six head of hogs, and is doing well. He was married in l877 to Miss Dooley, of Rose Creek Township. They have one daughter--Clara E., born in 1880. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

W. R. BISE, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Greene County, Tenn., in 1837. In 1841, his parents emigrated to Missouri, and lived in Osage, Cole and Crawford counties, until 1849, when they moved to Iowa, locating in Lee County, remaining there until 1851, when he emigrated to Clark County, Missouri, remaining there until 1861; then enlisted in the Illinois infantry, serving three years. He was promoted to Fourth Sergeant, then Orderly, then was transferred to the Sixth Independent Light Artillery of Chicago, and was promoted, receiving a Second-Lieutenant's commission. He was mustered out at Chicago in August, 1864. After coming out of the army, he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Atchison County, and engaged in farming, remaining there until 1869; then to Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 8, Township 1, Range 2, a tributary of Rose Creek running through the place. He broke 90 acres, planted 4 acres of forest, 500 peach, 50 apple, 100 cherry and plum trees, besides small fruit, and put in good buildings, two good wells, and remained there nine years; then sold out and bought a farm on Section 25, Township 1, Range 2. He has 66 acres under the plow, a forest of 3 acres, 700 fruit trees of different varieties, good frame house 14x22 feet, with an ell twenty feet square, and a cellar full size of main building; barn large enough for four horses, 1,100 bushels of corn, 3 tons of hay, 14 acres fenced for pasture, with hedges and cross hedges. He is raising from twenty-five to thirty hogs to dispose of each year, besides some blooded horses. He has three fine colts--Norman Blackhawk, and two others. He has been Justice of the Peace one term, Township Treasurer one term, besides holding several school offices nearly all the time he has been in the county. He is a very popular man, and is usually chosen as the delegate to the County Convention of his township. He was married in 1859 at Williamstown, Missouri, to Miss S. E. Williams. They have seven children Living--W. M., A. N., N. A., O. M., Bertha C., Daisy F., and Thomas.

W. F. BOBENHOUSE, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Prussia, in 1845. In 1853 he emigrated to America, locating in Indiana, where he remained two and one-half years; then emigrated to Iowa, locating in Wayne County; and when of age learned the carpenters' trade, and followed this business until 1870; and then came to Kansas and took a homestead on Section 25, Township 1, Range 2. His mother came with him and took a homestead on the same section, and they have 320 acres in one farm. He was among the first settlers on the prairie. He has 130 acres under the plow, eighty acres of pasture, and the balance in hay land. He has about three acres of timber, planted about 100 apple trees, 20 cherry, and some peaches and small fruits. He is also raising stock, has twenty-six head of cattle, five horses, 115 head of hogs, and usually has 100 to sell each year. He has a fine house, 14x26 feet, a story and a half, with an addition 14x16 feet, barn 36x40 feet, and everything convenient around the place. When he first came here he worked at his trade to help make a living while getting his place improved, and has followed carpentering and building considerable until 1881. He put up a great many buildings in Ida, among which is the schoolhouse. He was married in 1871 in Wayne County, Iowa, to Miss L. A. Allen. They have four children, Alice, Maggie, Sadie and Edith. He is a member of the Masonic order, I. O. O. F., Ida Lodge, No. 147.

E. D. BUGBEE, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, in 1843, and was raised there until twelve years of age. In 1855 went to Illinois, locating in Warren County, where he remained until 1862; then enlisted in the One Hundred and Second Illinois Infantry, serving nearly three years. In 1865 was wounded at the battle of Reseca, Georgia. Was mustered out at Washington in May, 1865. After returning from the army settled in Boono (sic) County, Iowa, where he remained until he emigrated to Kansas in 1871. Located in Republic County, and took a homestead in Liberty Township. He was among the early settlers there, and helped organize the township, and was the first Constable elected in the township, and held the office six years. He improved his place, broke 110 acres, put up a house and stable, dug a well, planted 10,000 forest trees, and a small orchard. In 1878 sold out and bought a farm on Section 19, Township 1, Range 2, and has 100 acres under the plow. He put up a good house, 14x22 feet, with wing 12x18 feet, porch on each side. He has planted five acres of fruit trees, fenced twenty-five acres for pasture, and has thirty acres of meadow. Rose Creek runs through his place, which makes wood and water in abundance, and a good place to raise stock. He will raise from five to ten cows each year, and turn off from fifty to sixty head of hogs. He was married in 1862 to Miss Sarah Frentz of Warren County, Illinois. They have three children, W. A., Frank E., and Jessie Mabelle. He is a member of John Brown Post No. 44, G. A. R., Belleville Lodge No. 127, A., F. & A. M., and of the Anti-Horse Thief Association.

T. CARPENTER, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Lancaster County, Ohio, in 1849. In 1854 or 1855 emigrated to Iowa, locating at Cedar Rapids, where he attended school until 1868, when he was employed as a clerk in a hotel two years; and in 1870 emigrated to Kansas, and took a homestead on Section 19, northeast quarter, Township 1, Range 2. He was among the first settlers in the township; has 100 acres under the plow, sixty acres of pasture, a hog pasture of about seven acres. Rose Creek runs through the place, with twenty five or thirty acres of timber along the stream. He has a good house, stone barn, 18x35 feet with basement under the whole. He has fifty head of cattle, seventy-five hogs, 11 head of horses; and has done well since he came here. In 1878 he was married to Miss Gaskell, of Rose Creek. They have four children--Bert E., Zula May, Zella M. and Henry C.

J. E. COOPER, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Henry County, Indiana, in 1838, where was raised, and lived there until he came to Kansas. In 1864 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-seventh Indiana Infantry, serving about seven or eight months, and was on detached service in the Commissary department. In 1870 he located in Republic County, Kansas, and took a homestead on Sections 20, 29 and 30; 160 acres. This place he improved by breaking seventy acres, planting one acre of forest trees around his house, seventy-five apple trees, twenty-five cherry trees besides grapes and other small fruit. Rose Creek flows through the place, and there is about fifteen acres of timber along the stream. He has a good stone house, and is raising stock, and markets about sixty to 100 hogs each year, and has three head of horses. He was among the first settlers in Rose Creek Township, and was the first Trustee elected in the township and held the office five years, and took the census for 1880 in the township. He was married in 1861 in Henry County, Indiana, to Miss S. E. Julien of that place. They have one daughter, Lulu May, born in 1863. He is a member of the Republic County Co-operative Association.

G. W. DIXON, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Preble County, Ohio, in 1831, and was raised there until twenty-two years of age, and emigrated from there to Knox County, Illinois, and engaged in farming remaining there about seventeen years. In 1870 he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 27, Township 1, Range 2, and was the first settler on the prairie in this part of the township. He had to draw his provisions and feed from Marysville and Waterville, sixty miles, and a part of the time had to go to Brownville, a distance of 130 miles for corn. He has sixty-five acres under the plow, the balance is hay land. He has planted 4,000 forest trees, a good orchard of apple, peach and other small fruits and grapes. He has put up a good frame house and barn, and is raising stock. He has six head of cattle, and is raising from twenty to twenty-five hogs to market each year; and has one of the most desirable farms in the township. He was married April 7, 1853, to Miss Elizabeth A. Miller, of Preble County, Ohio; she was born in that county in 1834. They have two children--Cora A. and Nellie. Mr. and Mrs. Dixon and Cora are members of the Christian Church.

HENRY C. FULLER, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio 1838. Soon after his parents moved into Illinois, locating at Peoria, where he was raised, and lived there until 1870. He was brought up on a farm, and in 1861 enlisted in the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, under Colonel Indgersoll, and served with the regiment four years, and was mustered out at Washington September 20, 1865. He was wounded at Egypt Station, Mississippi, in 1864 and was captured at Scott's Hill Tennessee, 1863, but was paroled soon after. In 1870 emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and in May took a homestead on the northwest quarter of Section 33--160 acres. There were no improvements on the prairie at that time, and only a few settlers on the creeks. He began at once to improve the place, and now has eighty-five acres under the plow, twenty acres fenced for pasture, fifty-five acres of meadow, planted five acres of forest trees, and has 260 apple, fifty peach and 100 cherry trees, some good grape vines, three-quarters of a mile of hedge, a good stone house; and is raising a good many hogs, and has from thirty to thirty-five to market each year. Mr. Fuller has been one of the hardest working men in the township, and is a thorough-going business man, and very popular in his township, being social and well posted in the topics of the day. He was married in 1871 in Rose Creek township to Miss E. Sellers. They have three living children--Nancy M., W. W. and A. A. He is a member of Belleville Lodge No. 127, A., F. & A. M.

JOHN S. GLEASON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Ida, was born in Hancock County, Illinois, in 1839, and lived there until August 1861, when he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving until June, 1865. He was in the Western Department, and was in twelve pitched battles and many skirmishes. He was at the siege of Vicksburg and Spanish Fort. He was mustered out at Mobile. After coming out of the army he emigrated to Iowa, locating in Lucas County, and engaged in farming. In 1870 he came to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 1, Township 2, Range 2, and commenced to improve the place. He was among the early settlers in the township, and one of the first to engage in the stock business. He broke fifty-five acres, put up a good house and barn, planted a large grove of forest trees, a good orchard, and made sundry other improvements; and remained on this place until the fall of 1881, when he sold out and bought the northwest quarter of Section 26, Township 1, Range 2. He has ninety acres under the plow, a good house and barn, an orchard of fifty peach, 400 apple trees and small fruits, a fine grove of forest trees, and it is one of the best farms in Rose Creek Township. He is extensively engaged in raising stock, and has sixty head of cattle, fifty head of hogs, and makes a specialty of stock. In 1866 he was married to Miss Nancy C. Leeper, of Newbern, Iowa. They have eight children--George N., Mahala J., Mary E., Landy T., Charles N., Calvin, Joseph A, and Harriet B. Mr. Gleason is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

G. W. HUTCHISON, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, in 1823, living there until 1838, when he emigrated to Illinois, locating in Clark County, remaining there two years, thence to Richland County, remaining there about eight years. After leaving Richland County, Illinois, he emigrated to Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin, where he studied surveying; here he remained eight years, then emigrated to Mahaska County, Iowa; he then practiced surveying in connection with his other business until 1874, when he came to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 24, southwest quarter Township 1, Range 2, of 160 acres. He has about eighty acres under the plow, and the balance in hay land; has two acres of timber of various kinds, about 200 peach trees, fifteen apple trees, and pears and other small fruits. He has a good frame house and barn, and is engaged in raising stock; also does some work at his trade each year. He was married in 1853 at Indianapolis, Iowa, to Miss Owen. They have six children--Jennie, John E., George W., Mary A., E. J. and D. L. Iowa.

JOHN M. JONES, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Mercer County, Ill., in 1847, and was raised there on a farm, living on the same place until 1871, when he came to Kansas and took a pre-emption on Section 21, Liberty Township, Republic County. In the fall of 1872 he was united in marriage with Orpha, daughter of N. W. Wells, of Rose Creek Township. They moved on to a homestead taken by his wife, adjoining her father's place, on Section 29, and as they could not both hold a place after marriage, he sold his pre-emption, and began improving the place taken by his wife. They have 150 acres broken, 30 acres of pasture, has planted two acres of forest trees, two acres of apple trees, and the same number of peach trees; besides small fruits, plums, cherries grapes, etc. He has 680 rods of hedge, has four good wells, two good frame houses, a stable and granary, and is raising stock; has about thirty-three head of cattle, and has one full-blood Short-horn, which he imported from Missouri; and is grading his stock. He has fifty head of hogs, eleven head of horses; has a fine Norman, valued at $400; besides, usually buys and feeds a car of cattles(sic) to ship each year. Is one of the most enterprising men in the town, and is doing well. Mrs. Jones is also a good manager, and assists a great deal in helping to get ahead, by her judicious management in the house. She was born in Dane County, Wis., in 1850, and came from Wisconsin with her father in 1871, riding a horse all the way, and driving a herd of cattle.

MATTISON BROS, merchants, Ida. James Mattison was born in Schuylkill County, Pa., 1847, learned the shoemakers' trade, and remained there until 1868, when he emigrated to Iowa, locating in Marion County, and opened a boot and shoe shop, remaining there until 1874, then emigrated to Kansas, locating at Ida, and went into the mercantile business with H. C. Roise; at the end of eighteen months bought out Mr. Roise, and his brother John went in company with him, remaining this way until 1882, when a half brother, Aleck Unitt went into business with them. They are having a good trade, it having grown from $4,000 to $15,000. They have the only store of the kind in the place; and they have given good satisfaction. They also own a farm of 109 acres, in Section 26, with eighty-five acres under the plow, and are raising some stock. James was appointed postmaster in the year 1879 at Ida; was married in 1870, in Iowa, to Miss Margaret A. Roise. They have six children--Mary, Kate, Roy, Frederick, Grace and Rebecca. He is a member of Ida Lodge, No. 147, I. O. O. F.; has been Justice of the Peace one term.

JOHN MATTISON was born in Schuylkill County, Pa., remaining there until 1876. Went to Kansas and went into business with his brother James. Was married in Pennsylvania, to Miss Henrietta Roise, in 1872. They have one child--Laura. Is a member of Ida Lodge, No. 147, I. O. O. F. Aleck Unitt was born in Schuylkill County, Pa., in 1860. Came to Kansas in 1882, and went into business with his brothers John and James.

HON. WM. M. MOORE, farmer and stock-raiser. P, O. Ida, was born in Yorkshire England, August 8, 1842. At the age of six years, his parents moved to America, and settled in Milwaukee County, Wis., where he was raised, and lived there until 1871, when he moved to Kansas, locating in Republic County and settled on a homestead on Sections 30 and 31, Township 1, Range 2. Lived on this place six years; engaged in sheep-raising; and sold out in 1878; bought a farm on Sections 29 and 32, and put on a flock of 300 sheep of medium grade merino. The average clip has been six and one-half pounds, and the investment has paid 50 per cent. Has fifty acres under the plow, the balance, 270, he uses for a ranch for his sheep. Has three fine springs, furnishing plenty of pure, fresh water; has about one acre of timber, and a good orchard of twenty-five peach trees, 200 apple trees and twenty-five cherry trees. In 1870, was elected as a Representative from his district to the Legislature, and has held the office of Township Clerk two years. He is a strong advocate of the temperance cause, and has devoted a great deal of his time to the temperance work. He was married February 24, 1869 to Miss Sarah M. Persons, of Wisconsin. They have four children--William H., Sarah M., Charley P. and Emma M. He is a member of the Republic County Co-operative Association.

JOHN MOSSHART, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio in 1842, and was raised there until 1861, when he enlisted in the Eightieth Ohio Volunteer infantry, serving until June, 1865. After coming out of the army, he emigrated to Iowa, locating in Benton County, where he was farming the most of the time. In 1870 he came to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 30, Township 1, Range 2, of 160 acres. There were no improvements on the prairie at that time, and but few settlers in the county. Has 190 acres under the plow, forty-five acres fenced for pasture, and about five acres of forest trees planted. Has a fine peach orchard of 250 trees, 125 apple trees, thirty plum trees and seventy-five grape vines, besides a large amount of blackberries and raspberries. Has since added forty acres, which takes in Rose Creek, making a fine pasture, as there is plenty of water and fifteen acres of timber. He is raising considerable stock; has forty-two head of cattle, 140 hogs, and usually buys and feeds a car of stock every winter. Has done well. He came here without anything, and had to go sixty-five miles to market, and has met with many draw-backs, but has mastered them all, and is as thrifty a farmer as there is in the township. Has a good house and stable, and a pleasant home. Was married in 1869 in Benton County, Iowa, to Miss Elizabeth Blotter. They have four children--Olive May, Edward C., Alice Maud, and Charles J. Is a member of the Anti-Horse Thief Association.

C. A. NORTHROP, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Warren County, Pa., in 1839, and was raised in the vicinity until 1861, when he enlisted in the Ninth New York Cavalry, serving seven months, and was discharged on account of disability. After regaining his health he enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Infantry, serving nine months, then re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Fiftieth Infantry, serving until the close of the war. After the war he moved to Tama County, Iowa, remaining six years. In 1871 he located in Republic County, Kan., took a homestead on Sections 18 and 19, Township 2, Range 1, and has lived there continuously since. Rose Creek runs through the place, furnishing plenty of water and he has about thirty acres of timber, of which there is a large per cent of oak, besides ash, walnut, etc.. There is one very fine place in this timber where pic-nics and celebrations have been held since the town was settled. He has added eighty acres, making 240 acres in all. Has 130 acres under the plow, thirty-five acres of meadow; and has planted 300 apple trees, 100 cherry trees and twenty-five peach trees, and has some small fruits. He has a good brick house, 23x29 feet--the first put up in the town. Is raising a good many horses, has sixteen head and fifty head of hogs; and is one of the most successful farmers in the township. Has been Justice of the Peace, and has held other town offices, and is one of the Trustees in the Republic County Co-operative Association. He was married in 1865,in Erie County, Pa., to Miss Lucina C. Putnam, a descendant of Gen. Putnam. They have three living children--Hattie, Joseph and Albert. The oldest son, Willie, died in 1874, aged eight years. Mr. Northrop is president of the Anti-Horse Thief Association.

F. T. POWELL, farmer, P, O. Hubbell, Neb., was born in Livingston County, N. Y., in 1843, remaining there until 1861, when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fourth New York Infantry, serving two years as Sergeant of Company B. He was taken prisoner at the second battle of Bull Run, August 30, l862, and was taken to Point Rock, Maryland, and from there to Cumberland, and then paroled. After coming out of the army, settled near Columbus, Ohio, and engaged in farming. In 1869 he emigrated to Kansas and located in Republic County. Was about the first settler in the township. Took a homestead on Section 11, Township 1, Range 2; has since added 150 acres of Section 10, making a farm of 310 acres, which is well-watered by Rose Creek and four fine springs. He has about thirty acres of timber, as fine as any in the county; has a good lot of black walnut, black and burr oak, ash, elm, hackberry, and a half acre of black mulberry; has sixty-six acres of pasture, the balance is hay land. He has one-half mile of hedge, a good orchard, consisting of 100 apple trees, twenty-five peach trees, plums, cherries and all kinds of small fruits and a few grapes; has a good stone house 16x20 feet, two stories high, and a good granary, 16x20feet, with a stone basement full sized for a stable; raises considerable stock, and markets from seventy-five to 100 head of hogs annually; has some choice land which has produced ninety bushels of corn to the acre and thirty bushels of wheat to the acre. He has been appointed Town Treasurer one term, and has been Clerk of the school district ten years. When he first settled here he had to go fifty miles to market, and until 1880 had to go thirty miles to a railroad. Now he is about two and one-half miles from a station. He was married in 1865 at Columbus, Ohio, to Miss Ruth A. Godown, of Franklin County, Ohio. They have three living children--Ethel, May, born in Rose Creek, Kan., May 2, 1870, the first white child born in the township, and Eldine. Mr. Powell is a member of Ida Lodge, No. 147, I. O. O. F. United with the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1864. There were but sixty acres of breaking done in the township in the spring of 1870, and but thirteen persons in the township, and only seventeen voters in the fall election of 1870.

A. STEENBLOCK, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1832; at the age of nineteen years he emigrated to America, locating at Freeport, Ill., where he remained three years engaged in farming; thence to Hardin County, Iowa, and he remained there until 1860, when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in what was known as Breckenridge District, remaining one year, when he returned to Iowa, remaining there until 1870; he then returned to Kansas, locating in Republic County and took a homestead on Section 28, Township 1, Range 2, where he now lives. He has 110 acres under plow, thirty acres fenced for pasture; the balance is hay land; he has two acres of forest trees and has an orchard; has a fine house 22x24 feet, story and-a-half, and the place is well watered by a tributary of Rose Creek. He has twelve head of cattle, thirty-two head of hogs and fifteen head of horses, and has made about all he has since he came here. There were no improvements on the prairies when he settled here and was at the first election held in the township. He has been Justice of the Peace two terms and was highly respected by all. He was married in 1858 in Hardin County, Iowa, to Miss T. Bowman; they have ten children--Annie, born in Kansas in 1860; Ellen, Wirtje, William, Hannah, Martha, Bessie and Sina; two have died. Mr. Steenblock is a member of Belleville Lodge, No. 129, A., F. & A. M., Ida Lodge No. 147, I. O. O. F.

S. F. VlNTON, real estate agent, was born in Chenango County, N. Y., in 1833; was raised there until twenty years of age and learned the carpenters' trade; then emigrated to Illinois, remaining there until 1857, and was engaged in teaching. From there he went to Missouri and located in Chillicothe, remaining three years, working at his trade; then took a trip to the Rocky Mountains and Colorado, remainining(sic) two years; part of the time was engaged in running a hotel; afterward returned to Illinois, locating in Whiteside County and in the early part of 1865 he enlisted in the Sixty-fifth Illinois Infantry; was mustered out the following September; he then returned to Whiteside County, Ill., where he remained until 1870; then emigrated to Iowa, locating at Preston, Jackson Co., and went into the mercantile business; he then put up a cheese factory which he carried on about two years; in 1878 located in Republic County, Kan., and began contracting and building at Ida, doing considerable work in Ida and vicinity; in 1880 began handling real estate and purchased a number of town lots and put up a fine residence for himself, the best in the place. Was also elected Justice of the Peace and re-elected in 1882. Was married in l857, at Whiteside County, Ill., to Miss M. E. Nichols; they have one child--Ida M. Is a member of Ida Lodge No. 147, I. O. O. F, and the A. O. U. W. of Iowa.

LEANDER WELLS, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Wyoming County, N. Y., in 1840, living there until about 1848; thence to Crawford County, Pa, where he remained until 1860; worked in the cabinet and rope factory for his father a good share of the time; from there emigrated to Grant County, Wis., and in 1862 enlisted in the Twenty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, serving three years; in November, 1863, was taken prisoner at Carencro Bayou, La, and was taken to Alexandria, where he was kept about ten months: after coming out of the army went to Pennsylvania, remaining there two years, going from there to Iowa, where he remained until he came to Kansas in June, 1870; located in Rose Creek Township and took a homestead, northeast quarter of Section 33; now owns 288 acres in one farm, with ninety-five acres under the plow, thirty-five acres of pasture, the balance being hay land; has five acres of timber which he planted and one mile of hedge, good orchard--seventy-five apple, 100 peach, eighty-five cherry trees and a variety of small fruits; has a good house, a large granary 18x30 feet with stone basement large enough for four teams, new barn 38x44 feet with basement under part of it; has three good wells and a windmill pumping water. Is raising stock and has from fifty-five to sixty head of hogs; is one of the best famers(sic) in the township and has a choice farm. Was married in 1875 in Rose Creek Township to Miss Almira Garner. Is a member of the Grange.

N. W. WELLS, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Windham County, Vt., 1827, and was raised in Genesee County, N. Y.; until eighteen years of age he was brought up in a hotel, going from there to Illinois, locating in Kane County, remaining two years and then to Columbia County, Wis., where he engaged in farming and from there to Crawford County; January 1, 1864, enlisted in the Sixth Wisconsin Infantry, serving nineteen months and was mustered out in July, 1865; he was wounded in a charge during the battle of the Wilderness in 1866(sic). After receiving his discharge he returned to Crawford County, and engaged in farming, but concluded he could do better West and moved to Kansas in the spring of 1871, locating in Republic County and took a homestead on Section 29, Township 1, Range 2. He had a little money when he came out which he invested in a stone house 22x24 feet, the best in the town; his wife was in poor heath and he was afraid to live in a Kansas dugout; so he spent all his money in building and at the end of six months he had not enough money to pay the postage on a letter; this continued for seven months. He began to improve his place and in four years he had 150 acres under the plow, five acres of trees planted--250 apple trees, 100 peach and a variety of small fruit, cherries, plums, etc.; has a granary 18x28 feet with a stone basement large enough to hold eight head of horses, and is making money; during the second year and just before harvest he went to Belleville to see if he could get some groceries on thirty days' time and offered security on his cattle or crops and he could not get them; this so discouraged him that he went home and sat down and shed tears, but soon after went to Fairbury, Neb., and was able to get all he required. Since this he has made money very fast and now is independent, being one of the best farmers in the township, having a farm well improved and a new house costing about $1,800. Is engaged in raising stock and hogs; raises about 100 hogs annually and is breeding some very fine horses; sold one in the fall of 1880 for $400 and has some colts which will command a high price. He was married in 1847 to Miss Elizabeth Maynard of Columbia County, Wis. They have six children, viz: Orpha C., Oscar H., Annie, Hattie, George and Fred. He is a member of the John Brown Post No 44, of Belleville.

J. G. WHITELOCK, farmer, P. O. Chester, Neb., was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1833; was raised there, learning the carpenters' trade and remained there until 1859; emigrating from there to Nebraska, he settled in Plattsmouth when there were but three business houses in the place and began contracting and building, following this business until the war broke out in 1861, when he enlisted in the First Nebraska Regiment as First Sergeant Company A., first company raised in the State; at the end of the first year was promoted, receiving a Second Lieutenant's commission and served as such four years, serving in all five years. After coming out of the army he returned to Plattsmouth and was employed as a salesman in a store for two years; he then located at Ashland, Neb., and engaged in contracting and building, remaining there until 1876, when he sold out and emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County and purchased a farm of 242 acres on Section 30, Rose Creek Township. He has 168 acres under the plow; the balance is meadow. He has three acres of timber, a good orchard, seventy peach trees, seventy apple trees, cherries and small fruits of all kinds, and is extensively engaged in raising hogs, marketing from sixty to 100 each year, and will increase this and raise all the farm will produce feed for. He is raising 150 acres of corn at the present time. He was married in 1856, at Warren County, Ind., to Miss Malissa Aughe of Williamsport, Warren Co., Ind. They have three children - Frank, Guy, and Robert. They are also raising a niece of Mrs. Whitelock, Sophia M. Ennis. In 1868 Mr. Whitelock was elected Sheriff of Saunders County, Neb., and served for two terms, four years in all, and after term of service was appointed City Marshal of Ashland, and held that position for seven years and worked at his trade as carpenter and contractor.

[TOC] [part 16] [part 14] [Cutler's History]