KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


REPUBLIC COUNTY, Part 13

[TOC] [part 14] [part 12] [Cutler's History]

LINCOLN TOWNSHIP.

G. B. BASSETT, farmer, P. O. West Creek, was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1844. In 1852 his parents settled in Mercer County, remaining there until 1873; then emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County. Landing there in February, he took a homestead on Section 21, southwest quarter, Township 4, Range 3; is well situated for stock-raising. He has about fifty acres under the plow, has a good orchard of 125 peach and forty-five apple trees, and one-fourth acre of raspberries and other small fruits; he has three and one-half acres of forest trees and one-half mile of hedge on the place. He is extensively engaged in raising hogs and turns off from seventy-five to one hundred head each year; also raises some cattle, but makes a specialty of hogs and corn. He has done well since he came to this State. He has held the office of Township Clerk for five terms, besides other offices, part of the time he has been here. He was married January 2, 1870, to Miss Harriet Clark, of Mercer County, Ohio; they have four children living--Minnie, Permelia, Mary E. and George. Mr. and Mrs. Bassett are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES J. DAY, farmer, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1843. In 1852 his parents emigrated to America, locating in Richland County, Ohio, remaining there about nine years, going from there to Williams County, where he engaged in farming. In 1862 he enlisted in the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, Company K, remaining one year. He was discharged at Warrenton Junction in 1863. In 1871 he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 30, Township 4, Range 3, and put up the first house in this part of the country, building it out of cottonwood plank; size, 12x16 feet. He had but little to do with, and had to go sixty miles to mill and market, and for a few years it was hard work to get along, but by close attention to his business and by hard work and economy, he has his place improved, and is one of the best in the township. He has seventy acres under the plow; the balance is used for hay land; he has three acres of forest trees planted, 200 peach trees, besides apple, grapes and other fruits. He has a good frame house 14x22 feet, with an addition 14x20 feet; good barn 22x30 feet, and other necessary buildings for grain, tools, etc. He is also engaged in stock-raising. He is a miller by trade, and has followed that business some since he has been in the State. He was married in 1867 to Miss Lucy Funk, of Williams County, Ohio; they have three children--Leah, Luther and Minnie. Mr. Day is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

J. E. GALLOWAY, farmer, P. O. Concordia, was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1853. His parents settled in Mercer County, Ill., while he was quite young, and he remained there until 1874, and then emigrated to Republic County, Kan., where two of his brothers had settled previous to this. He bought 160 acres on Section 33, the northwest quarter, Township 4, Range 3, which was wild land, and he has improved it by breaking seventy acres, has seventy acres fenced, is planting a grove of forest frees, a good orchard of fifty apple trees, 100 peach trees and small fruits of various kinds; put up a good stone house 19x27 feet, and numerous other improvements. He has been engaged in stock-raising for a number of years; was in company with his brothers, and they bought, fed and shipped stock. Mr. Galloway is one of the oldest teachers in the southern part of the county, and has taught some nine or ten terms in all, giving entire satisfaction, having had a number of years experience in the East previous to locating in Kansas, and is considered one of the most enterprising and capable young men in the town.

J. M. GALLOWAY, farmer, P. O. Concordia, was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1846, and when six years of age his parents emigrated to Illinois, locating in Mercer County. He was brought up here on a farm and in 1864 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fortieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving six months and was discharged and mustered out at Chicago. In 1872 he emigrated to Kansas, located in Republic County and homesteaded on Section 29, Township 4, Range 3. The place is well watered by a large spring which flows out of the yard, forming a small creek furnishing plenty of water for stock. He has sixty five acres under the plow, thirty acres of pasture, and the balance is hay land, also a grove of forest trees, a good orchard of fifty apple, fifty peach and fifty plum trees, besides cherries and other small fruits. He has been more or less engaged in stock-raising for a number of years and turns off from seventy to eighty hogs each year besides some cattle. He is one of the leading farmers of the town and was Town Trustee and Assessor one term. He was married in 1879 at Peach Creek, Clay Co., Kan., to Miss Elizabeth McBride of that place. They have one daughter--Mabel, born in 1880.

R. H. GALLOWAY, wool grower, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County. At the age of five years his parents emigrated to Mercer County, Ill., where he received a common school education, finishing with a special course under instructions at home. He taught a few terms of school after which he was employed as salesman and bookkeeper for a number of years. In 1872 he emigrated to Kansas and took a homestead on Section 33, Township 4, Range 3. This place he improved and was engaged in the stock-raising business in company with his brother for a number of years and was also one of the first and best teachers in this part of the county and taught a number of terms after his settlement in Kansas. In 1880 he sold his homestead and 160 acres in Section 22, Township 4, Range 3, bought 60 acres, put out a small orchard, and built a house 16x24 feet. In 1880 he engaged in wool growing and has 1,000 sheep of the medium merino breed; the average clip is from seven to seven and one-half wool and the per cent on the investment will average thirty-five to fifty per cent per annum. He was married in November, 1881, to Miss Henry, of Viola, Mercer Co., Ill., and they have one daughter. He is a leading man in the town and popular with all who have made his acquaintance and is a leading member of the United Presbyterian Church.

W. G. HAY, farmer, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Jefferson County, Ind., in 1825. He was raised there until twenty-one years of age, emigrating from there to Marshall County, living there and in adjoining counties about four years. He then went to Iowa, locating in Benton County, where he remained nineteen years, was engaged in farming and working at the carpenters' trade. On January 12, 1871, he located in Republic County, Kansas, and secured a homestead on Section 30, Township 4, Range 3, and was one of the pioneers of this town and like nearly all who came here at that time had but little to do with. He has 100 acres under the plow, two acres of forest trees, a good orchard, 400 peach and apple trees and a large variety of small fruit, 320 rods of hedge, good frame house 14x24 feet, stone barn 24x34 feet, nineteen and one-half feet to the eaves and is quite extensively engaged in raising stock;, turning off from fifty to 100 head of hogs and a number of cattle per annum. He had but $10 when he moved on his place and was sixty miles from market or mill. He was married in Benton County, Iowa to Miss Samantha Shaul of that place, in 1853. They have eight children living--Sarah, Pelonia H., Lottie A., Rolly E., Ebert E., Jennie O., Bertha W., Gaylen and Annie. Mr. Hay is a member of the Farmer Alliance and Anti-Horse Thief Association.

LEVI KIMMAL, farmer, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, in 1836, living there and in Loraine County until 1850 then emigrated to Mercer County, Ill.; he remained there until 1860 when he was seized with the Pike's Peak fever and took a trip to that point but not meeting with the success he anticipated he remained but a few months going from there to California where he remained three years, returning from there to Mercer County, Ill., and engaged in farming. In 1872 he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, taking a homestead on Section 33, Township 4, Range 3. He was one of the pioneer settlers of his township and secured one of the best claims in this part of the country. The place is well watered by a branch of West Creek, making a very desirable place for stock-raising and Mr. Kimmal is working into the branch of farming. He has twenty-eight head of cattle, four head of horses and forty head of hogs. The place is well improved with seventy-five acres under the plow, fifty-six acres for pasture, and the place is surrounded by a good hedge fence besides two cross hedges dividing the place into four forty-acre lots. He has three acres of good forest trees and the same of orchard, consisting of apple, peach and cherry trees, besides small fruits of all kinds, good frame house 14x18 feet, one-story and a half, with wing 12x12 feet, has a good stone basement 22x34 feet which he is preparing to build a barn on, besides granary, corn-crib and other buildings. He has made all of this property since coming to Kansas. He was married in 1863 to Miss Fanny Hines, of Mercer County, Ill. They have six children--Annie J., Charles H., Joseph B., William M., Elsie L. and Mary E. Mrs. Kimmal and their eldest daughter, Annie, are members of the Presbyterian Church.

H. C. MILLER, farmer, P. O. West Creek, was born in Putnam County, Ohio, in 1839. In 1854 he emigrated to Iowa, locating in Fayette County and remaining there until 1855, went to Missouri, locating in Daviess County and remained there until 1859, then went to Kansas, locating in Atchison and remained there until 1861, and from there settled in Jefferson County on the Delaware Reservation, remained there two years and then located at Clay Centre, Clay County and remained there until 1868, and thence to Woodson County and was there about two years, coming from there to Republic County and bought 160 acres on Section 16, paying $3.50 per acre. The farm is well watered by a branch of West Creek and a fine spring. There is about twenty-five acres of timber along the creek. He also has a good stone quarry of magnesia lime stone covering about four acres and has eighty acres under the plow, twenty-five acres fenced for pasture, good orchard, although small, good stone house 16x20 feet built of stone taken from his quarry. He has a small grove of forest trees and one of the best stock farms in the town and is fast commencing to raise stock. He has twelve head of cattle, eight head of horses and twenty-five head of hogs. This he will increase to enable him to feed all the grain he raises. He was married in 1862 to Miss Mary Khunley of Clay County, and they have five children--Fred, Harvey, Mattie, Sarah and Mabel.

J. P. NUTTER, farmer, P. O. West Creek, was born in Alton, Illinois, in 1842. He learned the engineering trade and worked at this business until 1851 when he enlisted in the Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, serving three years and four months in Company K., was captured in Arkansas in 1864 but was paroled at the end of seventeen days and was mustered out at Hickory Station, Arkansas, and discharged at Springfield, Illinois, in 1865. After coming out of the army he engaged in farming and in 1872 emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County and in March took a homestead on Section 21, Township 4, Range 3. He secured a good homestead and has sixty-five acres under the plow, eighty acres fenced for pasture and about twenty acres of hay land. He has a fine grove of about three acres of forest trees, forty apple trees, a number of peach trees and small fruits of all kinds. He has built a good stone house 17x27 feet, two stories high and has a stone quarry and a fine spring in his pasture and also a large well with wind mill. He keeps a large number of cows and does quite a business in dairying and butter making. He was married in 1867 at Decatur, Illinois, to Miss Caroline Crow and they have five children--John, Charles, George, Maud and Claude.

OSCAR PARK, farmer, P. O. Concordia, was born in Mercer County, Ill., in 1849, and was raised on a farm and lived in that county until 1872, when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, in June, and secured a homestead on Section 33, Township 4, Range 3. He was among the early settlers of the town and has a very desirable place. His building commands an extensive view of the surrounding country, no less than three towns and cities can be seen from his place besides an extensive view of the Republican River and Valley. He has eighty acres under the plow, sixty-five acres of pasture besides a field of twenty-seven acres fenced. He has a hedge around the entire place and a fine grove of forest trees consisting of box elder, soft maple, cottonwood and honey locust. A fine orchard consisting of seventy-five apple trees, 225 peach trees, fifty young cherry trees and a variety of small fruits. He has a new frame house 14x23 feet and twelve feet high with basement full size, stone basement for barn 26x40 feet, a well 169 feet deep with sixty-two feet of water using a wind-mill for pumping. He is somewhat engaged in stock-raising and will increase his stock to consume all the feed his place will produce. He has thirteen head of cattle, six head of horses, fifty head of hogs, and is raising from forty to fifty head annually for market. He has done well since his settlement in Republic County and is one of the most reliable men in the township. He was married in 1870 to Miss Susan Guthrie of Mercer County, Ill., a native of Canada. They have six children--Celia A., Jesse E., Royal G., Myrtle S., Fannie B. and George C. Mr. Park is a member of the United Presbyterian Church and an Elder in the same.

JONAS RARICK, farmer, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Licking County, Ohio in 1842 and was raised in that county until about fifteen years of age, thence to Illinois, located in that State and engaged in farming, remaining there about twelve years, thence to Iowa, locating in Buchanan County, remained there until 1870, then emigrated to Kansas locating in Atchison County, remaining there three years thence to Republic County and took a homestead on Section 20, Township 4, Range 3, and bought 160 acres on the same section making one-half section in his farm. He has running water on his place besides several good wells. He has 120 acres under the plow, 130 acres fenced for pasture, forty acres of forest trees planted consisting of walnut, soft maple and cottonwood. He has a good orchard of 100 apple, 215 peach trees, besides pears, cherries and other small fruits, also has a fine stone quarry on the place which furnishes plenty of building stone for his own use. He has put up a house of the stone 21x32 feet, and is quite extensively engaged in raising stock. He has forty-eight head of hogs and thirty-eight head of cattle and is also raising amber sugar cane in which he is very successful. He has raised four crops and has a mill and manufactures syrup. The first year he made 800 gallons, second year 1,800 gallons and the third year did not do as well. For the year 1882 he had a large crop of cane which was extra nice. The syrup sells for 50 cents per gallon at the factory and this pays a good per cent, as he gets from seventy to 120 gallons per acre. He was married in 1842 in Hancock County, Ind., to Miss Elizabeth Watts of that place. They have four children--William F., George H., Clinton J. and Mattie C. He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. since 1870.

WILLIAM P. RARICK, farmer, P. 0, Concordia, Cloud County. was born in Juniata County, Pa., in 1841, but while quite young his parents settled in Licking County, Ohio and he was raised there, remaining until 1858 when he emigrated to Macon County, Ill., and engaged in farming. In 1870 he started for Kansas reaching Republic County in March of the same year and filed on Section 7, Township 4, Range 3. After holding it two years he made timber filing and put out fifteen acres of timber and has 10,000 living trees, mostly cottonwood which will average four inches in diameter, he has sixty-five apple trees besides some small fruits. Since settling here he has bought 160 acres on Section 8, adjoining his first place. This land has a fine stream of water called Turkey Creek and there is considerable timber along the creek. There are ninety acres of pasture which takes in the creek, 150 acres under the plow and the balance is hay land. He has a good stone house, good stable and is preparing to put up a large barn, has a good well, good wind-mill and is in good shape for stock-raising which he is working into. He has twenty-five head of cattle and raises from 100 to 150 head of hogs annually. For the first five years it was pretty hard to do much as he was sixty miles from market and only had an ox team to do the work, but since the railroad has come through the north part of Cloud County it has made a good market for both stock and grain. Mr. Rarick is well pleased with the choice he made in settling in Kansas. In 1874 he was married to Miss Lydia Slipler, of Concordia, Kansas. They have three children--Minnie, Joseph and Walter.

H. SKEELS, farmer, P. O. Jay Eau, Republic County. Was born in Lewis County, N. Y., in 1829. When six years of age, his parents emigrated to Licking County, Ohio. He was raised here until twenty-two years of age, and then located in Mercer County, and engaged in farming until 1859; going from there to Kentucky, where he remained until the war broke out, and being a strong Union man and a Northerner, was obliged to return North, locating in La Fayette, Ind. In 1863, he enlisted in the Sixteenth Indiana Light Artillery, serving nineteen months. Was stationed at the entrenchment at Washington; was discharged and mustered out of service at Indianapolis, Ind., July 6, 1865. Returning to Mercer County, Ohio, he engaged in farming, and remained there until 1873, and then emigrated ed(sic) to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 5, Township 4, Range 3. This place he has improved by breaking 100 acres, fenced 8 acres with hedge, planted a forest grove of 8 acres, planted 200 rods of hedge, 75 peach trees, 200 apple trees, put up good stone house 17x29 feet, with an ell 14x16 feet, good stables and granary of stone. and has been engaged in farming, in which he has been successful. He has been doing well enough since he settled here. He was married in 1864, in Mercer County, Ohio, to Miss Almeda Hesser, of that county. They have been blessed with five children, all deceased but the second, Lambert Willie. In June, 1877, he had the misfortune of losing his wife, leaving him alone just as they had got their home in shape to enjoy life.

Z. J. TATE, farmer, P. O. Jay Eau. Was born in Harrison County, Indiana, in 1838. Was raised in Crawford and Orange counties, and made his home there until 1870. Learned the cabinet-makers' trade and worked at this business, and when the war broke out was among the first to respond to the call for volunteers, serving in the Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry from July 4, 1861, until Dec. 10, 1865. He received his discharge at Galveston, Texas. He was wounded at the battle of Shilo, receiving three shots--one in the collar bone, and one shot through the elbow, and one through the hand. After coming out of the army, he located in Orange County, and in 1870 emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 5, Township 4, Range 3. He was among the early settlers on the plain, and was sixty miles from market. His place is well watered by numerous fine springs, and he has 85 acres under the plow, 6 acres of forest, 500 rods of hedge, a fine peach orchard of 1,200 trees, 75 apple trees, and a full variety of small fruits. A good stone house 17x21 feet, stone barn 18x22 feet; 27 acres of pasture, and is engaged in stock-raising, turning off from thirty-five to fifty head of hogs yearly, besides, some cattle; also raising from 200 to 300 bushels of peaches, which meet with a ready sale at good prices. He has been eat out with grasshoppers and other drawbacks, but has been gaining some each year; has worked at the plasterers' trade some since he came here, which has been a help in the years when the crop was short. Was married in 1866, in Crawford County, Ohio, to Miss Rhoda Hall. They have four children--Mary A., Edward, Effie, Loella. Is a member of the A., F. & A. M., and a Patron of Husbandry.

GEORGE W. TITTLE, farmer, P. O. Concordia, Cloud County, was born in Van Buren County, Mich, in 1846; when nine years of age, his parents emigrated to Iowa, locating in Davis County, and remained there until May, 1863. Then enlisted at the age of seventeen, in the Seventh Iowa Cavalry, serving three years. He was on the plains fighting the Indians the most of the time. Was stationed at Fort McPherson for a time to help build the Fort. He was discharged, and mustered out in May, 1866, at Leavenworth, Kansas, and disbanded at Davenport, Iowa and then returned to Davis County and took a two years' course at Troy Academy, in th,at (sic) County, and was then engaged in teaching a good share of the time until he came to Kansas, in 1871, and located in Republic County, on Section 14, Township 4. Range 3. He has 140 acres under the plow, with the balance used for hay; has two miles of hedge; put up a house 16x24 feet: wing, 14x16 feet: stone stable, 15x23 feet; is engaged in stock raising, making a specialty of hogs, turning off from 100 to 150 each year. Also ships some cattle and most of his hogs. He has seventy-three head of cattle, and feeds from forty-five to seventy-five each year. He has been Township Trustee and assessor two terms. He has taught a number of terms since he came to this State. He has been very successful since he engaged in the stock business. He started in 1876 or 1877 with seventeen calves. He was married June 18, 1874, at Troy, Davis County, Iowa, to Miss Sarah C. Haine of that place. They have been blessed with two children--Della H., born May 31, 1875; Eber D., born Jan. 19, 1882. Mr. Tittle is a member of the Belleville Lodge No. 96, I. O. O. F.

SAMUEL WHAN, stock-raiser P. O. Concordia, was born in Mercer County, Ill., in 1843, where he was raised on the farm, and there received an idea of the stock business. In 1872, he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County. He took a homestead on Section 27, Township 4, Range 3, situated on West Creek. He also bought the whole of Section 26, Township 4, Range 3, previous to coming West, and has added to this until he has 800 acres in one body, one of the best and most extensive farms in the county. He has 130 acres under the plow, 4?0 acres of pasture, 180 acres of meadow; has 25 acres of timber on the creek, 4 1/4 miles of hedge, a good orchard of all kinds of fruits, good house 16x24 feet, with addition, 14 x 14 feet. Is extensively engaged in the stock business. Has 90 head of cattle, 200 head of hogs; besides this, buys and feeds, and also does some shipping, and is the largest raiser and shipper of stock in the township. He also owns the largest farm in one body in the township; has been very successful since he came here, as he had nothing to do with outside his land. He is one of the substantial men of the township, and very popular among his many acquaintances. For the first four years after settling in this State, he had to go fifty miles to market. He was married in 1868, in Mercer County, Ill., to Miss E. H. Peterson, of that place. They have five children - Alviso, born 1869; Edith, born 1870; Alice, born 1872; William, born 1874. Mr. Whan is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Mercer County, Ill.

ELK CREEK TOWNSHIP.

JOHN MOORE, farmer, P. O. Agenda, was born in the Shenandoah Valley, Va., 1836 remaining there until 1873, except what time he served in the army, from 1861 until February, 1862. In 1873, migrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 21, Township 4, Range 1. Was forty miles from market, and there were no improvements in sight, and but few settlers in the township. Has since added 160 acres on Section 28 to his place. This is well watered by Elk Creek, with five or six acres of timber, making a very desirable stock farm. Has sixty acres under the plow on the homestead, good frame house, good granary and stables, and a good orchard of 100 apple and 100 peach trees, grapes and small fruits. Has about twenty acres broke in Section 28, and 100 acres fenced for pasture. Has been working into stock, and has twenty-five head of fine cattle, which he will increase to about twice this number. Has made arrangements to ship some full-blooded Short-horn stock, which he will make a specialty of. Also raises from fifty to 100 head of hogs annually. Has been very successful since his settlement in this State. Was married in 1857 to Miss Julia Estep, of Virginia. They have two children, viz., Charles T. and Sarah A.

C. N. OSTRANDER, farmer and sheep-raiser, P. O. Seapo, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1848, where he was raised until twenty-one years of age. In 1869 migrated to Wisconsin, locating in Walworth County, remaining there about one year, thence to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Sections 18 and 19, Township 4, Range 1; also pre-empted 160 acres on Section 18, Township 4, Range 1; also took timber claim on Section 24, Township 4, Range 2. Has planted twenty acres of timber on this claim. When he settled on his place was forty miles from market or mill, and for a time had all he could do to make more than a living. Did a general line of farming. Broke 100 acres, planted an orchard, put out a grove of forest trees, built a good stone house, and put in other improvements. His place is well watered by Elk Creek, with some timber, making a fine stock farm, and in 1879 purchased 145 head of sheep, mostly Cotswolds, and turned his attention to wool-growing. In this he has been quite successful. The increase has been thirty-three and one third per cent per annum; the annual clip, seven pounds per head; and the investment has paid fifty per cent per annum. Has increased his flock to 307 head, and also increased the quality. Mr. Ostrander is a practical farmer, and one of the best citizens in the township, and is highly respected.

[TOC] [part 14] [part 12] [Cutler's History]