KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


REPUBLIC COUNTY, Part 12

[TOC] [part 13] [part 11] [Cutler's History]

FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP.

S. H. BALLARD, farmer, P. O. New Tabor, was born in Cuyaga County, N. Y., in 1842. In 1850 emigrated with his parents to Michigan, locating in Kent County, eleven miles from Grand Rapids, and he lived on the farm until the age of twenty-one and then engaged in farming for a time and then sold out and engaged in the mercantile business at Moon, Kent County, for a short time, when he sold out and engaged in farming again. In 1878 came to Kansas and engaged in farming on Section 27, Township 2, Range 2. Has 115 acres under the plow and 5 acres of forest trees; 60 apple trees, 60 peach trees and small fruit of various kinds; has 30 acres fenced with wire for pasture, and a large hog pasture, and about 15 acres of hay land, and has a good barn 24x30 feet; 16 feet posts, and a good frame house 16x24 feet, one and one half stories high; good well and wind-mill, and is raising hogs and cattle; also runs a feed wind-mill which will shell and grind feed for forty head of cattle. Although Mr. Ballard has been in Kansas only a short time he has taken the lead in many things and is one of the most enterprising young men in the county; has been Justice of the Peace the past two terms and has been a delegate to the Congressional Convention. He is one of the lively men in politics and a strong Republican. He was married in 1868 in Kent County. Mich., to Miss Elizabeth Swinson. They have four children, viz.. Harry, Claude, Mary and Charley. He is a member of the Olympic Lodge No. 34, K. of P. Is an Auditor in the Republic County Co-operative Association.

A. G. BROWN, farmer, P. O. New Tabor. Was born in Warren County, Ill., in 1849 and in 1859 went to Iowa with his parents, locating in Page County, remaining there until 1869, when he came to Kansas and located in Riley County, remaining there two years; from there went to Republic County and took a homestead on Section 35, Township 2, Range 2; has 100 acres under the plow; 30 to 35 acres of pasture and the balance being hay land; has about 2 acres of timber and planted 25 apple trees and 300 peach trees, besides plum and other small fruits; has been engaged in raising stock. Markets from 35 to 40 head of hogs each year, and has been doing well. Is among the first settlers in the town, and his house was among the first put up in the township. He is a pleasant, hospitable gentleman, and very popular. He was married in 1875 in Albion Township, to Miss Knowlton. They have one child, Pearl, born June 25, 1876. He is a member of the Belleville Lodge No. 129, A., F. & A. M.

CHARLES O. BROWN was born in Syracuse, N. Y., in 1839. In 1844 his parents emigrated to Wisconsin, locating in Kansas; thence to Lyons, where he remained until about 1859; then went to Geneva, where he learned carriage ironing, remaining there about three years; thence to Columbia County and was there about one year; then back to Springfield, where he opened a shop and remained there two years; then took a trip to Iowa, remaining one summer; then back to Geneva, Wis.; then took a trip to Missouri and remained there but a short time and then went to Iowa and bought a farm and put up a shop and carried on this line of business until 1868, when he sold out and went to California, remaining there in 1870; returning East, locating in Republic County, Kan., and took a homestead on Section 21, Farmington Township, and built a shop and remained there three years. This was the first shop started in Farmington. Then sold out and bought a farm adjoining, and run(sic) a shop there also, remaining there two years; then took a trip to California, remaining there about six months. Returning to Kansas, he built a shop in New Tabor, remained one season and sold out and took a contract to keep the Stage Company's stock and stages in repair; moved to Prairie Home, two miles south of New Tabor, remaining there two years. Since then he has bought and sold several different places in the town, and has done considerable in real estate. He bought a farm on Mile Creek of 160 acres on Section 17, Township of Farmington, and one on Section 24, Rose Creek Township, and will make real estate his principal business. He is a thorough business man and no doubt will make this business a success as he has whatever he has undertaken in the past. He was married August 28, 1860, at Wheatland, Wis, to Miss Irena Ingham of that place. Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic order.

A. J. HILL, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in Shelby County, Indiana, Aug. 8, 1827, and was raised there until twenty-two years of age. In 1851 emigrated to Iowa, locating in Davis County, and engaged in farming, and remained there until 1871, when he came to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead in Section 29, Township 2, Range 2, southeast quarter. Was the first settler on the prairie in this part of the town; has 100 acres under the plow, 60 acres fenced for pasture, has planted two acres of forest trees, and has some cottonwoods which have been planted ten years, fifteen inches in diameter; 140 apple, 300 peach, 25 cherry trees, and an abundance of plum and small fruit; put up a barn 33x43 feet, with basement full size, the basement 8 feet and barn 14 feet posts; a sheep shed of stone, 30x60 feet, and stone house 14x30 feet; has devoted himself to stock-raising; has been raising a good many sheep but has disposed of the most of them; only has 164 at present; has proved sheep to be very profitable, realizing about sixty per cent on the investment; has been raising a good many colts and mules; owns the finest Jack in the county, weight, 850 pounds, four years old, besides 17 head of horses, 19 head of cattle, and 70 head of hogs, usually having from 50 to 70 to market each year. Mr. Hill is one of the leading farmers of this town, and one of those substantial men who help to improve every county they settle in. Has been Justice of the Peace one term and Constable one term. Was married in 1850 in Shelbyville, Indiana, to Miss Caroline E. Brant of that place. They have five living children, vis., Andrew, William, Philip L., Mary, and Harvey. Is a member of Belleville Lodge No. 96, I. O. O. F.; is a charter member of the same, and the only one in the lodge at present; has belonged to the order since 1856.

J. HOOSER, farmer, P. O. New Tabor, was born in Plattsville(sic), Grant Co., Wis., in 1839, and was raised there on a farm until 1863, when he enlisted in Company B., Forty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, serving eleven months; was a sergeant; was mustered out September 15, 1864, and returned to Plattsville(sic) and engaged in the mercantile business for the next three years. In l87l emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 24, Township 3, Range 2; was one of the first settlers in Fairview Township, and put up the first house with shingled roof in the town; has a good place, well watered with four fine springs, furnishing an abundance of water for stock and for use in the house; has 120 acres under the plow, and the balance used for pasture and hay land; has four acres of timber, with a fine peach orchard, also plum, cherry and small fruits. Has a large stone house 18x26 feet, with addition 18x18 feet, a story and a half; good stone barn 20x30 feet, and a fair amount of cattle, and from forty to sixty head of hogs to market each year. In 1881 took a trip to Colorado with a view of selling the lot; concluded that Kansas was good enough for any man; was Justice of the Peace for five years; received the appointment first when the town was organized. Was married in 1861, at Plattsville(sic), Wisconsin, to Miss Jane Stoinhofer. They have four children, William G., Mary L., J. C. and B. F. Is a member of G. A. R., of Belleville Lodge No. 96 I. O. O. F.; Belleville Lodge No. 127 A., F. & A. M.

J. C. KEENE, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in England, in 1842; in 1852, came to America, locating in Pennsylvania, remaining there three years, going from there to Wisconsin; thence to Iowa, locating in Dubuque County, remaining there until the war broke out in 1861, when he enlisted in the First Iowa Infantry, serving about five months; was mustered out at St. Louis and returned to Dubuque County and taught school during the winter of 1862-63, and the following spring went to British Columbia, where he had a position offered him, remaining there nearly four years, having charge of a train in the forwarding business, shipping supplies to the mines; then took a trip to England, remaining about six months, when he returned, locating in Illinois; the following year, 1870, came to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 29, Township 2, Range 3. After six months went to St. Joseph, Mo., where he was employed on the bridge for one year; then returned to his homestead, which he has lived on since. Has 135 acres under the plow, thirty acres of pasture; has a fine grove of 1,000 maples, about three acres of cottonwoods; has good stone house and barn, and is engaged in stock-raising; has from 100 to 120 head of hogs to market each year, eighteen to twenty head of cattle, and a number of fine horses. Was elected County Commissioner in 1876 for one term, and has been Justice of the Peace a term or two. Was married in 1878 to Miss Edney Marsh of Freedom Township. They have two children, viz: James H. and Harry. Is a member of John Brown Post No. 44, G. A. R., of Belleville Lodge No. 96, I. O. O. F., and a member of Republic County Co-operative Society, and stockholder in the store.

JOHN LOVENBURG, merchant, New Tabor, was born in Bohemia in 1824; in 1850 came to America, locating in Buffalo, N. Y., where he remained three years, working at the shoemakers' trade which he learned while in the old country; then emigrated to Iowa, locating in Tama County, remaining there about eight years, and from thence to Benton County, and carried on a boot and shoe store and shop until 1869; then came to Kansas and located in Republic County and took a homestead on Section 35, Fairview Township. In 1870 his family came here and they moved on to his claim, living there until March, 1882; then put in a stock of boots and shoes, crockery, glassware and groceries at New Tabor and was appointed deputy postmaster at that place. Has his place well improved, having 107 acres under the plow, with an orchard containing apple, peach, plum trees and all kinds of small fruit. Mr. Lovenburg is a leading man among his people of which there is a large settlement in Fairview Township, and highly respected by all who know him. He was married in 1854, to Miss Mary Karl of Tama County, Iowa. They have eight children, viz: William, Frank, Malinda, Jaromil, Edward, Zdinek, Charley, Frederick. He is a member of the Masonic order and of the I. O. O. F., and was a member of the Union League.

JOSEPH NORTHROP, farmer, P. O. Ida, was born in Warren County, Pa., in 1815, where he was raised until 1849; thence to Crawford County, where he remained 16 years, engaged in farming; in 1865 emigrated to Iowa, locating in Tama County, remaining there until 1870, coming from there to Kansas, locating on his present place, Section 3, and 10, Township 2, Range 2, which he took as a homestead. There was but one log house anywhere near him. The town was not organized until the following year, when the meeting was called and held at the house of Mr. Northrop, and, as the place was in the high rolling prairie, he proposed the name of Fairview and it was so called. The elections were held at his house for some two or three years. Mr. Northrop's place is well situated and is highly improved, having 120 acres under the plow, from fifteen to eighteen acres of timber, a fine orchard, with apples, peaches, and plums, cherries, and small fruit; has some land seeded with blue grass, and the balance is used for pasture; is raising some cattle and a good many hogs. He is a leading man in the town, is public-spirited and enjoys the confidence of his fellow citizens. He was appointed assessor and trustee of the town when first organized and was elected to these positions afterward. He was married in 1836, to Miss Amie E. Sherman, a native of Washington County, N. Y. They have eight children, viz: Sherman, Charles, Cinthia--now Mrs. See; Sophrona--now Mrs. McNiel; Mary--now Mrs. See; Amie J.--now Mrs. Munson; Amanda--Mrs., Canfield; and Martha E.--now Mrs. Thompson. L. S. Northrop, deceased, the only son that Mr. Northrop had at home, came here with his father and was actively engaged in helping his parents build up a home in the West, and when his death occurred in 1875, his parents received a cruel blow from which they will not recover soon. Mr. Northrop is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and has been a steward in the church ever since it was organized in 1870, the meeting being called and held at his place. He is a member of the Republic County Co-operative Society and stockholder in the store.

J. N. SNYDER, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in Montgomery County, N. Y., in 1833, but was raised in Oneida County until eighteen years of age, going from there to Kankakee County, Ill., where he remained eight years, and was engaged in blacksmithing until 1862; then enlisted in Company H, Seventy-sixth Illinois Infantry, serving three years. In 1867 went to Iowa, locating in Story County, where he engaged in farming, remaining there until 1875, when he sold out and came to Kansas, locating in Republic County and bought a farm of 360 acres on Section 30, Fairview Township; soon after bought 139 acres on Section 19, same township; then bought 200 acres on Section 31, joining the home farm, making 560 acres in one body and the balance cornering with it; has 350 acres under the plow, 160 acres in pasture, ten acres in feed yards; has a grove of about two acres of maples, the same of box elders, with quite a large grove of cottonwoods; has plenty of peaches, apples, plums, cherries, and all kinds of small fruits. The place is well watered by a creek and eight springs; is extensively engaged in raising stock, of which he has a good grade of shorthorns. Has two good tenement houses, and has just completed a fine residence on the home farm, with plenty of timber about it and commanding a fine view of Belleville; has a good barn with basement, and has one of the most desirable places in the township. Has from eighty to one hundred head of cattle for market each year; has one of the finest shorthorns for breeding in the county, three years old and weighs 2,200 pounds. Was married in 1856, to Miss Mary J. Baldrick, of Oneida, N. Y. They have nine children, viz: Lillie, Icella, Eva M., Ethel, Guy, Nellie, Maggie, Daisy, John. Is a member of John Brown Post No. 44, G. A. R., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

FRANK SLOPANSKY, M. D., druggist, New Tabor, was born in Bohemia, 1845; in 1854, emigrated to America, locating in Buffalo, N. Y., remaining there two years; thence to Racine, Wis., where he was raised and lived until 1874; in 1867, began reading medicine, finishing in 1872; then began the practice of medicine at Racine, and in 1874 emigrated to Kansas and took a homestead on Section 7, Township 2, Range 1, and began the improvement of the same, and also practiced medicine among his countrymen, of which there is a large settlement in this part of the county. Has fifty acres under the plow, the balance uses for hay and pasture; has 160 apple and 50 peach trees and some small fruits; in 1878 put in a stock of drugs at New Tabor, the first and only stock of drugs in the place and has had a good trade in the same. Was married in 1871 at Racine, Wis., to Miss Annie Stotler, of that place. They have seven children, viz; John, Annie, (Victoria and Katie) Willie, Josie and Frank. Is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of Olympic Lodge, No. 36, K. of P.

J. A. SWENSON, stock-raiser, P. O. Belleville, was born in Sweden in 1847, and in 1853 came to America, locating near Plymouth, Wayne Co., Mich, remaining there two years, and thence to Kent County, settling in Grand River Valley, remaining there until 1870 helping his father to clear up a heavily timbered farm; from there came to Kansas and located in Republic County and took a homestead in Section 27, Township 2, Range 2, settled on it, remaining there seven years, when he sold out and invested his money in cattle and leased Section 20, in Fairview, and has turned his attention to stock-raising; has 125 head of cattle, with some very fine ones, and will make it a point to breed some good ones--will breed some forty or fifty head this season. He has one Durham which be had shipped from Clay County, Mo., for which he paid $100. He is one of the best stock men in the county and a man thoroughly respected as a thorough business man, public spirited and enterprising. He was married in 1881 to Miss Jennie, daughter of J. G. Arbuthnot, one of the early settlers of the county. They have one child, Karl I, born June 22, 1882. He is a member of I. O. O. F.

AUGUSTUS WEGAL, farmer, P. O. New Tabor, was born in Sweden in 1843, and in 1853 emigrated to America and located in Kent County, Mich., where he remained until 1870, when he came to Kansas and located in Republic County, taking a homestead on Section 27, Township 2, Range 2; has 125 acres under the plow, seven acres of timber, the balance hay and pasture; has good orchard--100 peach trees, 35 apple trees, and a variety of small fruits; is extensively engaged in raising hogs in which he is very successful. In 1880 bought the hotel at New Tabor which he enlarged and run(sic) for two years. He is one of the most enterprising young men of his town and is a leading man in all political movements. Served three years in the Fourth Michigan Cavalry; was discharged at Nashville in July, 1865. He was married in 1874 at New Tabor to Miss Maggie Skidmore. They have one girl--Myrtie.

S. I. WILSON, farmer, P. O. New Tabor, was born in Warren County, Ind., in 1835. Soon after his parents moved to Henry County, Ill., where he remained for nineteen years; from there he went to Iowa, locating m Union County, and engaged in farming, remaining there about eleven years. In 1873 he came to Kansas, and took a homestead on Section 25, Township 2, Range 2; has fifteen acres under cultivation; the balance is hay land; has five acres of forest trees, and has a good orchard, eighty-five or ninety apple trees, 400 peach trees, with cherries, plums and other small fruits. He is extensively engaged in raising hogs, and has been very successful. He has good buildings, and one of the best places in this part of the county. He was married in 1855, to M. A. Terpenning, of Missouri; they have four children--Rose, Esther, Ida V. and Alfred A. He is a member of the Republic County Co-operative Association.

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP.

ELI HASKETT, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in Tipton County, Ind.. in 1847. In 1856 his parents moved to Iowa, locating in Lee County, remaining there until 1864, when he enlisted in Company H, Ninth Iowa Infantry, serving until July, 1865; was mustered out in Louisville, Ky.; returned to Jefferson County, Iowa, remaining there until 1871; thence to Wayne County, Iowa, where he engaged in farming, remaining one year; then was engaged in different vocations until the spring of 1874, when he came to Kansas, and located in Jewell County, and was employed as a salesman by W. S. Chapman & Co., merchants, at Jewell Center, remaining there until January, 1877, then came to Belleville, and was engaged as salesman in the general store of E. E. Chapman & Co., remaining with them until they sold out in 1880; then bought a farm in Fairview Township, and was on the place from May until August 15, 1880, when he traded for a farm on Sections 6 and 7, Township 3, Range 2, consisting of 100 acres, located on Salt Creek, with plenty of timber, and a stream of running water, which furnishes plenty of water for his stock; also owns the southwest quarter of Section 19, Rose Creek Township; is engaged in raising hogs and to a considerable extent cattle; has seventy-five acres under the plow, and has fine, good buildings, and has his place in good shape, having put most of the improvements on since he settled there; is one of the most enterprising young men in the town, and a thorough business man. He was married in March, 1877, at Fort Madison, Iowa, to Miss Louisa Hicks; they have two children--Myrtle M., born in 1878; Cecil G., born in 1882. He is a member of John Brown Post, No. 44, G. A. R.; of Belleville Lodge, No. 55; A. O. U. W., and to the Blue Lodge and Chapter, A., F. & A. M.

J. E. VAN NATTA, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in Montgomery County, N. Y., in 1825, living there until eighteen years of age; emigrating from there to Illinois, locating in Cook County, and took a contract to build a mile of road on the pike to Chicago. This was his first venture for himself. From there he went to Winnishiek County, Iowa, and worked in a mill, and put up a store, and was in the mercantile business about two years; then went to Fayette County, and worked at the stone-masons' trade. He came to Kansas in 1861, and was one of the first settlers in this county, locating here, and lived on a piece of land on Salt Creek. and the following year settled on his present place, Section 19, Township 3, Range 2. In June, 1863, he took this place as a homestead, and has lived here all the time, except when driven out by the Indians; this occurred first in the summer of 1862, and again in the fall of the same year, and the last time in the fall of 1864. After this they were not troubled, but a great deal of damage had been done, and a good many killed and run into other parts of the county by the Indians. There were plenty of elk, buffalo, antelope and wild turkeys at this time. It was through shooting at an antelope that the Indians were first seen by Mr. Van Natta and an early settler who had a cabin near Mr. Van Natta's place, and were out in the bluffs looking to see if there were any signs of Indians, as they had received word they were in the vicinity. As they came down the bluff, they shot the first antelope, and took it down to the cabin and dressed it, and all at once they were surrounded by Indians, who demolished the food. They gave them meat and meal, and they camped near them and prepared for a feast. They did not offer to harm them, but the women were frightened, and the next day they packed up and left for a while. The first few years Mr. Van Natta and family had a pretty hard time; they were nearly one hundred miles from market, and had it not been for the game in the county they could not have pulled through. His place is situated on Salt Creek, which is well skirted with timber, and has plenty of fresh running water; has his place well improved, and is extensively engaged in stock raising; for a number of years has paid his attention more to raising hogs. He was the first Justice of the Peace in Republic County; received his appointment from Gov. Crawford, and has been elected since, holding the office a number of times in the township. He was married in March, 1856, in Fayette County, Iowa, to Miss Annetta Cory; they have three children--Della, James W. and John A. He is a member of the Republic County Co-operative Association. Mr. Van Natta is a respected gentleman.

G. W. WILCOX, farmer, P. O. Belleville, was born in Warren County, N. Y., in 1832. While quite young his parents located in Ohio, and remained there until he was eight years of age; then went to Illinois, remaining there about five years; going from there to Iowa, locating in Mahaska County; remained there until 1863, when he came to Kansas, locating at Clyde, and remained there about two years; thence to Lake Sibley, remaining there one year; then came to Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 31. Township 3, Range 2. The place is watered by Salt Creek, with about forty acres of good timber along its banks. He was among the early settlers here, and was obliged to leave once on account of the Indians. He also belonged to the militia, which was organized to protect the settlers from the attacks of Indians. The country was very wild at that time, and it was some eighty miles to market, and for many years he could not do much toward improving his farm. The place is well improved now, with seventy acres of plow land, seventy acres of pasture, the balance being meadow; has a good orchard, 320 rods of hedge, good buildings, and is raising stock; has twenty-five head of cattle, fifty head of hogs and quite a number of horses. He was married in 1861, in Marshall County, Iowa, to Miss Maria Bradford; they had five children--Emma C., O. W., Rosse(sic) M., A. L. and E. M.

[TOC] [part 13] [part 11] [Cutler's History]