KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


DONIPHAN COUNTY, Part 6

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GEARY CITY AND BRENNER.

Geary City was located in 1857 by a company of Leavenworth people, and was named for J. W. Geary, then Governor of the Territory. The original town site was purchased of C. Lewis, and contained two hundred and sixty acres. A quarter section was soon added to it and named Lewis' Addition, or South Geary. Shortly after the laying out of the town, the company discovered that their title was not clear, and they abandoned their scheme. The year 1857 saw the boom of Geary City, and though it grew considerably afterward, it was at a much quieter pace. The first building was a log cabin, not on the town site, and used as a saloon. The first on the town site was a hotel, built by the town company; the second was the office of the Era. The first store was built near the river and was opened by a Mr. Clutter; the second was a grocery run by Porter & Cooper; the third the furniture store of J. L. Roundy, who also opened the post-office in this year. The same year James McCahon put up his sign as an attorney, and Dr. F. Grubb began practice as a physician. Flickinger & Langdon put up a saw-mill which was run until 1859, and Frick & Grubb one which ran ten years longer, and was finally moved to Doniphan, (sic) A grist mill was built in 1860 by Frick & Franklin. About June, 1857, the Era was started at Geary City. It was Free-state in politics, and aspired to a literary character. The editors announced were, Dr. E. H. Grant, Republican, Joseph Thompson, Democrat, and Earl Marble, American. Grant was the first to retire, and was followed shortly afterward by Thompson. The publication was suspended in the latter part of the summer or the fall of 1858.

Brenner is a station on the Atchison and Nebraska Railway about four miles northwest of Doniphan. It was located in 1872 by the Railway Company and a depot built. A post-office was opened in 1874 with James McDaniel as postmaster.

The Norwegian Lutheran Church is located in Wayne Township, Doniphan County, and was built in 1871, and dedicated the same year. The first preacher was the Rev. Mr. Brown, a native of Norway. He was succeeded by the Rev. Mr. Hendrickson. He preached about two years and was succeeded by the Rev. Mr. Rorhnis. He preached about two years and was the last preacher, and left about two years ago. The land on which the church stands contains about half an acre, and was donated by Mr. Lars Nelson. The church as it stands cost about $300.

Oakland Methodist Episcopal Church. - This church is located in Wayne Township, Doniphan County. It was dedicated December 25, 1880. Rev. B. F. Bowen was the first preacher. The building as it stands furnished, and with a fine cabinet organ, cost about $1,300. Mr. Bowman preached until March, 1881, when he was succeeded by the Rev. F. F. Otto, who has the charge at present. The land on which the church stands, which contains about one acre, was donated by Mr. S. W. Hinckley. The church is well furnished, and its seating capacity is 165. Services are held every Sunday.

The Brush Creek School House was built and completed August 18, 1871. It is located in School District No. 34, Wayne Township, Doniphan Co. The Building Committee consisted of John Landis, Bethel, and Frank Sproul. The building cost $2,350. It was built for a graded school and has two rooms, upper and lower, and can accommodate 150 pupils. Mr. I. H. Watson, and Miss Mattie Gordon, were the first teachers. They were in time succeeded by James Mahew, Chas. Y. Sturgeon, Miss Annie Smith, Mr. J. Johnson, Chas. M. Cahan, L. N. Lynn, Frank Bullock, O. B. Edwards, J. F. Milburn and Alvin Hawkins. The school terms average seven months.

Brush Creek Methodist Episcopal Church was built and dedicated in the year 1871. The first pastor was the Rev. John Cook. He had charge, (sic) of the congregation for two years, and was succeeded by Rev. W. L. Leak, who held the charge for two years, and was succeeded by the Rev. Wm. Campbell. He had charge only one year and was succeeded by his father, Rev. Wm. Campbell, Sr. He also, only had the charge one year, and was succeeded by Rev. Mr. Hoffman, who had charge one year. The Rev. Mr. Amos succeeded him and had charge two years. Rev. L. V. Martin next had charge one year, and was succeeded by Rev. F. F. Otto. He had charge one year and was the last preacher in charge. The church is well furnished and cost $928.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

JACOB W. BAUER, Superintendent of the Ohio Mills, Geary City, came to Kansas in 1859, and locate in Columbus, Doniphan County, where he remained four years, and from there went to St. Joe, Mo. He lived there about three years and then returned to Columbus, where he lived six years and was engaged in farming. From Columbus be went to Wathena, where be lived twelve years. Six years of this time was spent in attending school, and during the other six be was engaged in learning the milling business at the "Eagle Mills" in that city. After he had learnt his trade he attended for a time the Central Weslyan College, at Warrenton, Mo. From there he returned to Wathena, remained a short time, and then went to Geary City and took charge of the Ohio Mills. Mr. Bauer was born in St. Joseph, Mo., September 14, 1859, and lived there altogether about three years. Mr. B. is a practical miller and understands his business thoroughly, as the largely increasing trade of the mills, under his supervision shows.

W. J. CANTER, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in March, 1867, and first located at Brenner Station, where he lived about fourteen years and then removed to Geary City, where he lived for three months and then moved to Petersburg, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Troy Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & A. M., and Troy Chapter No 16, R. A. M. He was in the army during the late war; was a member of the First Missouri Confederate Cavalry, and was enlisted in September, 1861, in Rushville, Mo. He was in the battles of Pea Ridge, Baker's Creek, and Corinth; was captured twice while in the army, the first time at Big Black Ridge, Miss., the second time at Fort Blakely, Ala., and was mustered out in May, 1865, at Jackson, Miss. Mr. Canter was born in Buchanan Co., Mo., October 20, 1840, and lived in his native place until his twenty-first year and then went to Jefferson County, Kas., where he remained a short time and then entered the Confederate army. After his discharge from the army he went to Rushville, where he remained until he came to Kansas. He was married in Rushville, Mo., in January. 1867 to Miss Sarah E. Fry, a native of Rushville, Mo. They have four children living - Cadie Lee, Mollie, Robert Allen and Annie B. Mr. Canter owns a farm near Brenner Station containing one hundred and sixty acres, partly rolling upland and partly timber. It is well cultivated, and has an orchard on it containing one thousand apple trees of the Wine Sap, Glen Dans, Jenneton, Belle Flower, Rambo and Brother Jonathan varieties, Mr. C. pays particular attention to raising grain and hogs. On this farm he will raise this season six hundred bushels of wheat and eight hundred bushels of corn. He has another farm in partnership with Mr. Joshua Saunders, which is located near Petersburg, which is known as the Lost Lake Farm, and contains six hundred and thirty-seven acres. About ten acres of this farm are in oats and the balance in corn. This year the yield promises to be unusually good.

F. M. CULP, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in the spring of the year 1855 and located at Iowa Point, where he remained one year, and was engaged in farming. From Iowa Point he went to Jefferson County, where he lived four years, and from there went to Colorado, near Denver, where he lived two years and was engaged In prospecting, and from there returned to Jefferson County. He lived in the latter place two years and then moved to Vernon County, Mo., where he lived until the War of the Rebellion broke out, when he entered Company E, Thirty Third Regiment, Missouri Militia. He was in this regiment about one year when he was mustered out. In the fall of the year 1862, he became a member of Company I, Eleventh Kansas Regiment of Cavalry. He shared in all the hardships and dangers of his command, was wounded twice - once severely - and was mustered out in September, 1865, at Leavenworth. He participated in the battles of Lexington, Mo., Prairie Grove, Pea Ridge and Wilson's Creek. Mr. Culp was Constable of Marion Township for three years. He was born in Scioto County, Ohio, February 14, 1846, and lived there until his ninth year, when his parents removed to Kansas. Mr. Culp was married in Troy, Kansas, April 24, 1871, to Miss Eliza McClellan, a native of Ohio. They have had six children, of whom four are living. The names of the survivors are: William Edward, Charles, Frances and Mary Jane.

JEHU ELLIOTT, teamster, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in the fall of 1861, and located first at Atchison, where he remained a short time, and then removed to Jasper County, Iowa, where he lived three years, and was engaged in farming and teaming. From Iowa he returned to Atchison, where he lived five months, and then went to Buchanan County, Mo., where he lived two years and then returned to Doniphan, where, or in its vicinity, he has lived for the last ten years. He is now and has been for a number of years employed as a teamster by Mr. Robert Flickinger, proprietor of the Ohio Mills of Geary City. Mr. E. has been Road Overseer of Wayne Township. He was born in Clay County, Ind., in 1845, and lived there until three years of age, when his parents removed to Newton, Jasper Co., Iowa. He lived there until sixten (sic) years of age, and then went to Denver and Salt Lake City, and was engaged in freighting across the plains. He was thus engaged for about three years, and then came to Kansas. Mr. Elliott has been married twice. The first marriage occurred in Geary City, Kas., in the fall of 1862. to Miss Mattie McLoughlin, a native of Missouri. The second marriage took place April 20, 1875, to Miss Emma Hotz, a native of Kansas, in Geary City. Mr. Elliott has had no children by these marriages, but has adopted a daughter of his brother's named Leona.

MARQUIS De LAFAYETTE GRATNER, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in the fall of 1880. and located in Geary City, where he has since lived. He is a member of the Free Will Baptist Church. Mr. Gratner was born in Jasper County, Ind., May 10, 1855, and lived in his native county until his eighteenth year and then removed to Corning White Co., Ind., where he lived one year and then moved to Pulaski County, of the same State, where he lived four years, and from there came to Kansas. Before he came to Kansas he was engaged in farming. Since he has lived in Geary City, he has been engaged as a laborer. Both of his parents are living.

MARENES HAGEMAN, farmer and stock raiser, Brenner, came to Kansas in October, l868, and located on his farm in Wayne Township, where he has ever since lived. He was a member of the School Board of District No. 51, Wayne Township, in 1869. Has also been a member of the Grange. He was born in Berkeley County, W. Va., Feb. 27, 1821. and lived in his native place until his twenty-fourth year, and then removed to La Porte, Ind., where be lived twenty years and was mostly engaged in farming. From Indiana he came to Kansas. Mr. Hagaman has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Berkeley County W. Va., in March, 1845, to Miss Elizabeth Couchman, a native of West Virginia. They had five children by this marriage, viz: George, Mary, Joseph, Ella and Nettie. The second marriage took place May 20, 1877, in La Porte, Ind., to Mrs. M. L. Walton. There is no issue by this marriage. Mr. H. has a fine farm of 220 acres, all upland, all enclosed, and very fertile. One hundred and sixty acres are in cultivation, the balance timber and pasture land. He raises stock and grain. He has plenty of good water on his farm, a large spring rising in every field. The improvements on his farm consist of a large comfortable house, a new barn, and granary and outbuildings. His orchard covers four acres and contains 300 apple, 100 peach, and about twenty-five cherry and pear trees.

EUGENE HINCKLEY, merchant and telegraph operator, Brenner Station came to Kansas In March, 1870, and located near Brenner Station, Doniphan County, where he has since lived. He is also Notary Public at Brenner. Mr. Hinckley was born in Adams County. Ill., December 3, 1854, and lived in his native place until his sixteenth year, when he came to Kansas. He was married December 2, 1875, at Brenner Station, to Miss Ella Hagaman, a native of Indiana. Her father, M. Hagaman, Esq., is an old resident of the State. Mr. Hinckley is one of the firm of Cook & Hinckley, dealers in general merchandise and coal, and shippers of grain, Brenner Station. They ship to the markets in Atchison, St. Louis and Chicago, on an average, 200 cars of grain each year. They have the only store at Brenner Station, and do a large and thriving business.

JOSEPH KENT, farmer, P. O. Troy, came to Kansas March 16, 1856, and located on the head waters of Brush Creek, Wayne Township, Doniphan County, where he has ever since resided. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of Troy Lodge No. 56, A. F. & A. M. He was born in Ross County, Ohio, and lived in his native place until his thirteenth year, when his parents removed to Buchanan County, Mo. In 1849 Mr. Kent went to California, from Missouri, and lived there nearly three years, and then returned to Buchanan County, Mo., where he resided until he came to Kansas. He was married in Buchanan County, Mo., May 21, 1854, to Miss Emma Richardson, a native of Indiana. They have six children, whose names are Jolin Perrin (married to Miss Willie Alice Deckard, a native of Kansas); Altie and Addie, twins (the first, Miss Altie, was married to John Howard Townsend, a native of Kansas. Miss Addie was married to Benjamin Whittaker, a native of Kansas) Hamilton D., Jennie (married to Franklin Townsend, a native of Kansas) and Jessie Alice. Mr. Kent has a fine farm of 240 acres, mostly rolling prairie. He has a fine new residence and large outbuildings. He has an orchard on his farm covering about four acres and containing about 250 apple, peach and cherry trees. He has also a vineyard which occupies about half an acre and consists of 275 vines. Mr. Kent devotes all his attention to raising grain and hogs. He had twenty-eight acres in wheat this season, and will get therefrom 700 bushels. He has eighty-five acres in corn and the estimated yield will be 3,000 bushels. Mr. Kent is one of the model farmers of Doniphan County, as the condition and management of his farm fully attest.

J. W. KENTZLER, dealer in general merchandise, Geary City, came to Kansas in December, 1857, and located in Geary City, where, with the exception of the time spent in the United States army, during the War of the Rebellion, he has always lived since he came to Kansas. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. He was in the army during the last war as a member of Company C, Eighth Regiment Kansas Infantry, and enlisted in Leavenworth, September 19, 1861. Mr. Kentzler took part in the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta, Decatur, Strawberry Plains and numerous smaller engagements. He was wounded seven times - once severely - but notwithstanding these wounds, he remained with his regiment, doing duty, except when in hospital, until his muster out of the United States service at Pulaski, Tenn., December 9, 1864. Mr. Kentzler was born in Mecklenburg, Prussia, Germany, March 11, 1828, and lived there until his twenty-eighth year, except seven years passed as a soldier in the German army as a member of the second Musketeer Battalion, in Rostock. After his term of service had expired he received an honorable discharge from the army, and then emigrated to America, first locating in New Orleans, where he remained one year and was engaged in cabinet making. From New Orleans he came to Kansas and settled in Geary City, where he has lived for the past twenty-five years. For the first ten years while living in Geary City (less the time spent in the army), be was engaged in cabinetmaking. Since his discharge from the army, owing to his wounds, which have incapacitated him for any severe manual labor, be has been engaged in the general merchandise business, and is meeting with fair success. Mr. Kentzler was married in Molchov, Germany, in September, 1855, to Frederika Reberg, a native of Molchov. They have four children living whose names are as follows: Louisa (married to Jacob Richard, a farmer of Wayne Township; they have three children living), Henry, Rosa and Theodore.

JOHN McCLELLAN, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas April 10, 1858, and located Petersburg, where he has since resided. Has been Constable and Road Overseer of Marion Township, and is Road Overseer of District No. 2 at present. Mr. McClellan was a member of Company A, Ninth Kansas Militia, during the Price Raid, and was enlisted in the fall of 1864, at Petersburg, served fourteen days, and was discharged at Atchison. He was born in Greene County, Pa., September 8, 1825, and lived in his native place until his twelfth year, when his parents removed to Athens County, Ohio, and where Mr. McC. lived until he came to Kansas. He was married September 8, 1849, in Athens County, Ohio, to Miss Frances Rutter, a native of Pennsylvania. They have six children living, whose names are, Eliza, Charlotte, Mary Jane, Alfretta, Arthur Henry and James W. Mr. McClellan has a small farm of forty acres, mostly bottom land, with a small portion of timber land. He has eighteen acres in corn, and it is estimated by competent judges that it will yield fifty bushels to the acre, which will make the total yield of corn 900 bushels. He had also ten acres in wheat this season, and the yield was unusually abundant.

JOB MCDANIEL, farmer, P. O. Brenner, came to Kansas in the spring of 1866, and located in Wayne Township, where he has resided since. He was born in Bradford County, Pa., June 15, 1825. and lived in his native place until his eighth year, when his parents moved to Athens County, Ohio, where he resided until he came to Kansas. He was married in Morgan County, Ohio, in June, 1846, to Miss Sophia Martha Shaner, a native of Muskingum County, Ohio. They have five children living, viz,: Arminda, Mandana, Vernillion Emery, Ulysses Clinton, and Ermina Breniss. They have also an adopted son, whose name is Alburtis. Mr. McDaniel's farm contains 154 acres, and is mostly upland. His house is comfortable and commodious and has a good barn and other buildings. The farm is partially inclosed by about three miles of hedge fence. He has a fine apple orchard on his farm, consisting of over 160 trees. He markets his apples in Atchison. He is close to the markets, and has every convenience for shipping his farm products to market, the depot at Brenner Station not being over a hundred yards from his line. He has good live stock of all kinds and his farm has rich soil and is very productive.

LOUIS MICHAELS, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in the spring of 1851, and located in Wayne Township, where, with the exception of eight years spent in Phillips County, and the time spent while a soldier in the United States Army, he has always resided since he has been in Kansas. He was in the late war as a member of Company G, Eighth Kansas Infantry, and enlisted in the summer of 1861. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, and shared in other engagements with his comrades, and was mustered out of the service in the fail of 1864. Mr. Michaels was born in Shelby County, Ind., March 27, 1837, and lived there until his fourth year, with his grandparents, his parents having both died, when they removed to Harrison County, Mo., where he lived until he came to Kansas. Mr. M. was married in November, 1860, at Geary City, Kas., to Miss Sarah Catherine Brown, a native of Missouri. They have seven children living, whose names are: Daniel Webster, Sarah Elizabeth, Ella, Louise, Cora Daisy, Freddie Doniphan, and Dollie May. Mr. Michaels has a small prairie farm of forty acres. His house is comfortable, and farm buildings in good order. His orchard contains about 130 apple trees, about equally divided between the Belle Flower, Wine Sap, Jenneton, Pippin, and Ben Dans varieties. He is a hard-working and industrious farmer, and attends to all the details of his farm personally.

JAMES O'BRIEN, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas in September, 1856, and located on Walnut Creek, Marion Township, Doniphan County, where he has lived since. He was Treasurer of the School Board of District No. 35, one term. He is a member of the Catholic Church, in Wathena. Mr. O'Brien was born in Kappoquin, County Waterford, Ireland, July 25, 1821, and lived there until his thirtieth year, when he emigrated to America, locating in St. Louis, where he resided two years. He then went to Hermon, Mo., where he lived two years, and then came to Kansas. He was married in 1845, in his native town, to Miss Bridget Wall, a native of County Waterford. They had four children, of whom only one is living, whose name is Thomas. He is a farmer, and lives near Normanville, Doniphan County. Mr. O'Brien's wife died in the spring of 1877, and is buried In the cemetery at Wathena.

COLLIS B. ROUNDY, P. O. Geary City, dealer in general merchandise, came to Kansas in the spring of 1856, with his parents, who located at Leavenworth, remaining about two years, and then removed to Geary City where C. B. Roundy has resided since. He is Justice of the Peace and Notary Public. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Roundy was born in Bangor, Maine, February 9, 1849, and lived in his native place only a short time, when his parents removed to Madison, Wis., where they lived about five years, and then removed to Kansas. Mr. Roundy was married in Buchanan County, Mo., April 19, 1874, to Miss Oma Whalen, a native of Missouri. They have three children living, viz.: Daisy E., Josephine, and Mary E. Squire Roundy's father, J. L. Roundy, was the first City Marshal of the city of Leavenworth. He was a distinguished architect and builder, and while living in Madison, Wis., was employed by Gov. Farwell to superintend the erection of a large flouring mill, in Madison. He also drew the plans and superintended the building of Bruin's Block, a large mercantile building in the same city. Mr. R's father was the first Postmaster of Geary City. After his death, which took place in Geary City, in April, 1865, his widow was appointed Postmistress, which position she holds to-day.

JOSHUA SAUNDERS, farmer, P. O. Geary City, came to Kansas May 17, 1854, and located in Wayne Township, Doniphan County. where he has since resided. He was the first Constable of Wayne Township. He is a member of Arcana Lodge No. 31, A. F. & A. M. He was a member of Company A, Ninth Regiment Kansas Militia, during the "Price Raid;" enlisted in the fall 1864, served fourteen days and was mustered out at Atchison. Mr. Saunders was born in Fleming County, Ky., November 23, 1825, and lived in his native place until 1864 (sic), when he left and came to Fort Leavenworth with the intention of entering the United States army during the Mexican War. Owing to the regiments at this point being all filled, his services were not accepted. From there he went to Linkville, Platte Co., Mo., where he resided about one year and was engaged in wagon making. >From there he went to St. Joe, where he lived two years, and then returned to Linkville, where he staid one year. From there he removed to Rushville, Mo., where he remained until the 12th day of August, 1854, when he moved his family into Kansas. Mr. Saunders was married in Platte County, Mo., August 12, 1848, to Mary J. Clemens, a native of Kentucky. They have five children living, whose names are Nancy Ellen, Louis Jackson, Sarah Eliza, Mary Elizabeth and Jefferson D.

JOSEPH A. SYMNS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Atchison, came to Kansas October 15, 1865, and located in the city of Doniphan, where he was engaged for three years and four months as clerk for his brother, A. B. Symns, then engaged in the general merchandise and pork packing business in Doniplian, now engaged n the wholesale grocery trade in the city of Atchison. After this time Mr. Symns moved to Wayne Township, where he bought a farm, on which he lives at present. He has been a member of the School Board of District No. 51, Wayne Township, for seven years. He participated in the last war as Sergeant of Company A, King's (Confederate) Battalion of Artillery (Laury's Battery), and enlisted in May, 1861, at Centreville, Monroe Co., W. Va., served three years and seven months, and was mustered out at Christiansburg, Va., in April, 1865. He took part in the battles of Cedar Creek, Winchester, Strasburg, Fisher's Hill, Harper's Ferry, and numerous other engagements. He was born January 22, 1839, in Monroe County, W. Va., and lived in his native place until October, 1865, when he came to Kansas. Mr. Symns was married in the city of Doniphan, May 20, 1869, to Miss Mary C. Shanks, a native of Kentucky. They have four children living, viz: John Asbury, Mary Jessie, Charles Maddy and Gertrude. Mr. S. has one of the finest and largest farms in Doniphan County. It contains 1,120 acres all under fence and about one-half in cultivation; the remainder is timber and pasture land. The improvements consist of a fine family mansion, large barn and convenient farm buildings. His orchard covers five acres and contains about 325 apple and 150 peach and cherry trees. He has plenty of good water on his farm, there being a living stream of running water on every quarter-section. He devotes his attention exclusively to raising grain and stock.

DAVID WYNKOOP, farmer, Brenner, came to Kansas in November, 1871, and located near his present place of residence in Wayne Township, where he has lived since. He has been Treasurer of the School Board of Wolf River Township. Mr. Wynkoop was born near Carlisle, Cumberland Co., Pa., in 1817, where he lived until his thirty-fifth year, when he removed to LaPorte County, Ind., where he resided until he came to Kansas. Most of his life has been spent in farming. He was married in Harrisburgh (sic), Pa., January 5, 1844, to Miss Sarah Ann Hoover, a native of Pennsylvania. They have seven children living, whose names are as follows: Ann Mary, married to G. V. Hagaman, a native of Indiana, and a member of the firm of Hagaman & Wynkoop, Atchison; Susanna Rebecca, married to W. A. Stanton, a native of Indiana, who is engaged in farming, and resides in Wayne Township; John H., a farmer, residing in Wolf River Township, married to Nannie Robertson, a native of Kansas; David M., dealer in hardware and agricultural implements, and junior member of the firm of Hagaman & Wynkoop, Atchison; Albert U., Schuyler C., and Samuel M. Mr. Wynkoop has a fine farm of 160 acres in Wayne Township, mostly roiling prairie and very fertile. He has also eighty acres near his homestead, and eighty acres about a mile and a half from his home. In Wolf River Township he has another farm of 220 acres. It is a fine level tract of land, and is counted one among the best of the fine farms in this township.

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