KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 31

[TOC] [part 32] [part 30] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - MISSION TOWNSHIP (MELL - WILLIS).

GEORGE MELL, farmer and stock raiser, Section 36, Township 3, Range 16, P. O. Baker, was born in 1842, in Aunsby, Lincolnshire, Eng., and lived in his native country until his fourteenth year, when his parents emigrated to Canada, locating in Bradford, Ontario, where Mr. Mell resided four years and then removed to Tazewell County, Ill, where he lived until July, 1862, when he entered the Union Army as a member of Company H, One Hundred and Fifteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, being enrolled at Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill., and was discharged at Camp Harker, Nashville, Tenn., in June, 1865. He participated in the battles of Franklin, Tenn., Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, two engagements at Tunnel Hill, Dalton, and Resaca. In the last named engagement he was severely wounded from the effects of which he suffers to-day. After suffering from his wounds for over six months, being most of that time confined in the United States General Hospital at Quincy, Ill., he rejoined his regiment at Nashville, and subsequently took part in the battle of Nashville, and numerous minor engagements. After his discharge from the United States service he returned to his home in Illinois, where he resided until the spring of 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has lived since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 83, I. O. of O. F. He has been one of the Commissioners of Brown County since January, 1883, and is now serving his first term. He was married at Delavan, Ill., in November, 1865, to Miss Amanda Virginia Rollins, a native of Virginia. They have six children - named Minnie E., Arthur E., Marcus G., Annie V., Charles Ernest, and Howard B. Mr. Mell owns a fine upland farm of 200 acres, lying one and one-fourth miles south of the thriving new town of Baker. It is all enclosed by good fences, is in a high state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water. The improvements are first class, embracing a neat and cosy residence, a new and convenient frame barn 32x64 feet, and other outbuildings; handsome groves and prolific orchards. Mr. Mell grows 3,000 to 3,500 bushels of corn, 500 to 1,000 bushels of small grain annually, keeps 20 to 35 stock cattle, 50 to 100 hogs, and 8 head of fine horses. Mr. Mell is a veteran of the War of the Rebellion, an honest, industrious and thorough farmer, a prominent and honored citizen, and has a high standing in his community.

[Image of D. Moore] DAVID MOORE, Justice of the Peace, Mission township, and proprietor of Hill Home nursery and farm, Sections, south half of 23, and southwest of 24, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Everest, whose portrait is at the head of this sketch, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1843, and lived in his native State until his seventh year, when his parents removed to Fulton County, Ill., where Mr. Moore resided until August 21, 1861, when he became a member of Company E, Thirty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, being enrolled at Avon, Ill., and discharged at Camp Benton, Mo., January 19, 1863. He re-enlisted the same day in Company A, First United States Marine Infantry, and was discharged form the United States service January 19, 1865, at Vicksburg. He participated in the siege of Vicksburg, in the red River expedition, under Gen N. P. Banks, in the Missouri and Arkansas campaigns of Gens. Curtis and Steele in 1862, Lake Chicot, Ark., and numerous minor engagements. After his discharge from the army he returned to his Illinois home, where he resided three years. In February, 1868, he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hiawatha Post, No. 130, G. A. R. He has been Justice of the Peace of Mission Township seven years, and is now serving his fourth term. He has been Clerk of the same township two terms. He was married in Schuller County, Ill., March 28, 1875, to Miss Sarah J. Baxter, a daughter of John and Ellen Baxter, old residents of Brown County. Mrs. Moore was born in Carroll County, Ohio, July 20, 1845. She, her brother Thomas T. and her sister, Catherine A. (Mrs. Wesley James) were born at one birth, being triplets; are all living to-day (sic), and have families. Mr. Moore and his estimable wife have six children, whose names are: William Logan, John Allen, Henry James, Lula Edna, Maggie J. and Martin Cleveland. Hill Home Farm and Nursery, the superb estate of Mr. Moore, lies three miles southwest of Willis and two miles west of Everest. It is 480 acres in extent, is well supplied with water by several spring branches, numerous fine springs, and Otter creek, which flows in a southerly direction through the farm. Mr. Moore grows 7,000 bushels of corn, and from 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of wheat yearly, beside raising several hundred bushels of oats, barley and flaxseed and feeding yearly 60 stock cattle, 100 fine hogs, 8 head of work horses and 100 choice Merino sheep. On the farm is one of the finest and most valuable quarries of building stone in the county. There are also forty acres of native timber on the property, containing a great number of walnut, hickory, oak and elm trees. In the spring of 1868 Esquire Moore purchased of Samuel C. Kingman, then Chief Justice of the State of Kansas, the old Kingman homestead, pre-empted by the Judge in 1857. In the fall of 1869 Esquire M. started the Hill Home Nurseries which now cover about 32 acres of the Kingman homestead, and has continued to operate them ever since. He has always on hand a good assortment of all kinds of nursery stock and makes choice fruit and ornamental trees, shrubbery, etc., a specialty. Esquire Moore is an honored and efficient magistrate of his county, a veteran of the War of the Rebellion, is a first-class farmer, has an estate worth a long day's journey to see, and is one of the representative men of this beautiful region.

MRS. SARAH MEREDITH, widow of Sylvester T. Meredith, Section 17, Township 3, Range 3, P. O. Hiawatha. Mr. Meredith came to Kansas in the spring in 1860 and located in Walnut Township, where he resided eight years, and was engaged in farming. He then removed to his farm in Mission township, where he lived until his death. He was a member of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 35, A., F. & A. M. He participated in the late war as a member of Company I, Thirteenth Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged June 26, 1865, at Little Rock, Ark. He was promoted to be Wagon-Master of his regiment, which position he held when he was discharged. He took part in the battles of Prairie Grove, Cane Hill and numerous others engagements, and was a brave and patriotic soldier. He was born in Freeport, Ohio, January 22, 1842, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, when he removed to Kansas. He died of disease, contracted in the army, September 18, 1881. Mr. Meredith was married August 26, 1866, in Hiawatha, to Miss Sarah Sprague, a native of Ohio. They have four children living, whose names are Nettie, John M., Charles N. and Louis M. Mrs. Meredith owns a fine upland farm of 160 acres, all enclosed, and has seventy acres in cultivation, the balance being timber and pasture lands. The water supply is good and cannot be excelled, and consists of two good wells and a fine, never-failing spring; the orchard covers about five acres and contains 500 peach, 300 apple, 100 cherry and a few pear trees. The improvements consist of a fine family mansion containing eight rooms with cellar, and surrounded by evergreens and shade trees, large frame barn, granary, corn crib, etc. Mrs. Meredith had ten acres in rye this season, which yielded twenty-five bushels to the acre; fifty acres in corn, which averaged fifty bushels to the acre; five acres in oats, which averaged fifty bushels to the acre. Mrs. Meredith manages her own farm and is a thorough woman of business, possessing good executive abilities.

ISAAC J. MILLER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34, Township 3, Range 15, P. O. Baker, was born in Butler County, Ohio, in 1817, and lived in his native State until his eighteenth year, and then removed to Fountain County, Ind., where he resided ten years; thence he removed to Champaign County, Ill., where he lived thirty-one years, and where he was engaged in farming. On October 15, 1874, he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. During the War of the Rebellion he was president of the Union League of Sadorus, Champaign County, Ill. He was Supervisor of Tolono Township, Champaign Co., Ill., one term, and has been Justice of the Peace of Mission Township, Brown Co., Kan., one term. He has also been an efficient member of the Board of School District No. 40, Brown County, for four years. He is a member of the I. O. G. T. Esquire Miller has been married twice. The first marriage took place in 1841, in Fountain County, Ind., to Miss Elizabeth Kerr, a native of Ohio. She died in 1850. Six children were the fruits of this marriage, of whom only one, a son, is living, and whose name is Jerome B. (married to Miss Helen Lane, a native of Michigan). The second marriage occurred in 1851, in Champaign County, Ill., to Miss Elizabeth W. Rock, a native of Virginia. Nine children were the fruits of this marriage, seven of whom are living, named Scipio A. (married to Miss Prue Taylor, a native of Kentucky), William R. (married to Miss Mattie J. Robinson, a native of Illinois), Jefferson H. (married to Miss Mattle Brown, a native of Kentucky), Alice C. (married to Frank Chandler, a native of Ohio, Andrew J., Grant and Mollie. Maple Hill Stock Farm, as the handsome 532-acre estate of Mr. Miller is called, lies two miles west of the thriving town of Baker. The farm is surrounded by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water by wells and the Delaware River, which flows through the east portion of the farm. The improvements are good and consist, in part, of a comfortable and cosy residence, two tenement houses, stock stables and lots, granaries, corn cribs, magnificent maple groves, and orchards, etc., etc. Mr. Miller grows from 10,000 to 15,000 bushels of corn, 2,500 bushels of small grain and cuts 50 acres of hay yearly, has 200 acres in pasture, keeps forty to fifty stock cattle, fifty to eighty stock hogs and eight to twelve fine horses. Esquire Miller is a thorough and practical farmer, a prominent and prosperous citizen, has been an honored magistrate of his county, and has a high standing in his community.

W. JAMES MOORE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 27, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1838, and lived in his native State until 1850, when his parents removed to Fulton County, Ill., where Mr. Moore resided until April 1867, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in Schuyler County, Ill., in October, 1862, to Miss Mary Baxter, a native of Carroll County, Ohio. They have five children, whose names are: Ella J., Hattie M., Willie, James A., and Clara Ettie. Lodiana Stock Farm, as Mr. Moore's splendid 270-acre farm is called, is located on the site of the once famous town of Lodiana. It lies four miles south of Willis and the same distance from Everest. It is enclosed by a handsome Osage hedge, is in a good state of cultivation, is reached by splendid roads, and is well supplied with water by wells, springs and running brooks. The improvements are first-class and embrace an elegant frame residence, containing nine rooms, two large frame barns, one 28x30, and the other, a cattle barn, 30x96, a combined corn crib and wagon shed, 25x25, and other good outbuildings. Mr. Moore grows 2,500 to 3,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 to 1,500 bushels of small grain, cuts fifty acres of timothy clover hay yearly, keeps from 30 to 50 stock cattle, 75 to 100 stock hogs, 100 fine Merino and Cotswold sheep and 10 head of good horses. Mr. Moore is a methodical, thorough and successful farmer; has an estate to be proud of, is greatly pleased with the country, is a good citizen, and an honorable, upright man.

HENRY C. NEFF, farmer and stock raiser, Section 21, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Hiawatha, came to Kansas in August, 1868, and located on his farm in Mission Township, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Neff participated in the late war as a member of Company G, First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted in Champaign County, Ohio, September 20, 1861. He was mustered out at Camp Dennison, Ohio, September 20, 1863. He took part in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Stone River and other minor engagements. At the battle of Stone River he was severely wounded in the left arm, from which he suffers to-day (sic). Mr. Neff was born in Cass County, Ind., January 9, 1842, and lived in his native State until his fourth year, when his father removed to Ohio, where Mr. Neff lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Champaign County, Ohio, February 25, 1864, to Miss Henrietta Kensinger, a native of Pennsylvania. They have five children - Willie A., David L., Mary A., Hattie B. and Bernard M. Mr. Neff has two fine upland farms of eighty acres each, all enclosed and all in cultivation. The water supply is good and cannot be excelled. The orchard covers three acres, and has 150 bearing apple, 100 peach and a few cherry, plumb and pear trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the farm. The improvements consist of a new seven-roomed frame cottage, with cellar, and surrounded with handsome evergreens and shade trees, stock stable, corn crib, wagon house, etc. Mr. Neff had six acres of oats this season, which yielded fifty-two bushels to the acre, and ninety acres in corn which averaged fifty bushels to the acre. He is one of the enterprising farmers of his section, and possesses the esteem and confidence of his neighbors.

JOHN W. PROCTOR, farmer and stock raiser, Section 13, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Hiawatha, came to Kansas April 10, 1856, and located on his homestead in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He took part in the late war as a member of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Kansas Infantry, and enlisted in Robinson, August 22, 1862, and was discharged at Little Rock, Ark., June 22, 1865. He took part in the battles of Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, and other minor engagements. Mr. Proctor was born in Moniteau County, Mo., May 12, 1841, and lived in his native State until his fifteenth year, and then came to Kansas. He was married March 26, 1871, in Robinson Township, to Miss Clara Gibson, a native of Iowa. Mr. Proctor has a fine farm of 160 acres, forty-five acres being bottom land and the rest upland. It is all enclosed, and has 140 acres in cultivation, the balance being timber and pasture land. The water supply cannot be excelled, and consists of two wells and a number of springs, and the middle fork of Wolf River flows on the south line of his farm. The improvements consist of a frame dwelling, 16x32, with an L 14x20, with a cellar, a frame barn and other outbuildings. He had twenty-seven and a half acres of wheat this season which yielded 346 bushels; nine acres of oats which yielded 293 bushels; seventy acres in corn which averaged fifty bushels to the acre.

E. N. PUGH, manager of elevator No. 1, Willis, was born in Greenup County, Ky., in 1853, and lived in his native State until 1876, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he resided until August, 1882, when he assumed the management of the elevator at Willis. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married in August, 1881, in Doniphan County, to Miss Emma Henney, a native of Illinois. Mr. Pugh is an active, energetic and prosperous young business man, and has a high social and mercantile standing.

WILLIAM ROBBINS, farmer, Section -, (sic) P. O. Baker, came to Kansas in 1867, locating near Prairie Grove, Doniphan County, where he lived twelve years. He then removed to Sumner County, where he resided one year, and then returned to Doniphan County, where he lived until March, 1882, when he removed to Mission Township, where he resides at present. Mr. Robbins was born in Illinois, February 6, 1848, where he lived until his nineteenth year, and then came to Kansas. He was married in Winthrop, Mo., July 4, 1859, to Miss Eliza McLaughlin, a native of Missouri. They have two children, whose names are - Luelia and James Marshal. Mr. Robbins has a fine upland farm of 180 acres, all enclosed and all in cultivation. The water supply is good. The improvements consist of a comfortable four-roomed frame cottage, stock stable, granary, corn crib, etc. The house is on an elevated site, from which can be seen the thriving new towns of Baker and Willis, and the city of Hiawatha. Mr. R. had 15 acres in oats this season, which averaged 50 bushels to the acre, and 97 acres of corn, which averaged 55 bushels to the acre.

HENRY H. SHARP, farmer and stock raiser, Section 15, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Claiborne County, Tenn., in 1835, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year. In the fall of 1856, he removed to Doniphan County, near Iowa Point, where he resided until the spring of 1883, when he removed to Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church (South). He was Treasurer of the Board of School District No. 56, Doniphan County eight years. He was married in Claiborne County, Tenn., in 1854, to Miss Rachel Cawood, a native of Claiborne County, Tenn. They have three children - Campbell Thornburg, a native of Tennessee and a resident of Brown County, married to Miss Virginia A. Jessee, a native of Missouri; Cordelia, married to B. G. Dickinson, a native of Virginia, and a resident of Washington Township, Brown County, and Leroy, married to Miss Alice Sweeney, a native of Doniphan County, Kan. Mr. Sharp is the fortunate owner of a fine upland farm containing 160 acres, lying two and a half miles southeast of the prosperous town of Willis. The farm is all enclosed, is in a good state of cultivation, has a good supply of water, and is finely improved by a new and elegant residence 16x32, with an L 14x16, with three handsome porticoes on the north, south and east sides of the building. Mr. Sharp devotes his attention chiefly to raising corn, hogs and cattle. He grows 4,000 bushels of corn yearly, feeds two car loads of cattle, keeps a dozen head of milch cows, 100 to 150 stock hogs, and 6 head of fine horses. Mr. Sharp is an old resident of Kansas, a hardworking and practical farmer, a good citizen and an honorable, upright man.

ALBERT D. SMALL, contractor and builder, Willis, was born near Marion, Ind., June 4, 1854, and lived in his native State until his fifth year, when his parents removed to the city of Leavenworth, where the family resided two years, and then removed to Severance, Doniphan County, where Mr. S. resided until October, 1882, when he removed to Willis, Brown County, where he has resided since. In February, 1883, he entered into partnership with Mr. Lester M. King in contracting and building. Since they have commenced business in Willis, this firm has contracted for, and erected, the fine residence of James Henry Baxter and Nathan Swiggett, Esqs., and their own shop, a two story frame building, 22x50, one of the largest, handsomest and most convenient carpenter shops in the State, and a large number of smaller buildings in the town of Willis. Previous to entering into partnership with Mr. King, Mr. Small, who was one of the original stockholders of the Farmers' Elevator and Mill Company, built the elevators of this company at Severance. Everest and Willis, the latter being a large and capacious building 44x50, and 60 feet high. Mr. Small attended the well known University at Highland, Doniphan County, while residing in that county. He was married December 15, 1858, in Severance, Doniphan County, to Miss Annie M. Springer, a native of Missouri. They have two children, names Albert Ernest, and George Amos. The firm of Small & King is one of the enterprising business firms of Willis, and the members thereof are well known for their mechanical ability, the excellence of their work, and the faithful manner in which they execute their contracts.

HENRY SMALL, farmer and stock raiser, Section 26, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Everest, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in 1835, and lived in his native State until 1865, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married in Darke County, Ohio, in 1863, to Miss Susanna Feger, a native of Ohio. They have seven children living, whose names are - Mary Catherine K. E., David Elmer Ellsworth, Marion Winfield Oscar, Sarah Clara L. D. M., Elwood Otis R. A., Harriet Elizabeth, and Harley Dow. Mr. Small owns two fine upland farms lying in Mission Township which together contain 320 acres. They are well calculated for stock farms, and range among the best in the township. These farms are all enclosed with good fences, are in a high state of cultivation, and are well supplied with timber and water; Mission Creek flowing through one of them in a southerly direction. The improvements are good, embracing among others, a neat and comfortable dwelling, stock stables, sheds and lots, handsome orchards, groves, etc. Mr. Small grows on his handsome Mound Valley Farm, as his estate is called, 4,000 to 5,000 bushels of corn, and 700 bushels of small grain, yearly; feeds a car load of cattle; keeps 40 to 50 stock cattle; 50 stock hogs; 8 head of work horses; a dozen head of milch cows, and makes and sells $200 worth of "gilt edged" butter, yearly. He is a hard working, intelligent and prosperous farmer, a good citizen, and has a high standing in his community, Mound Valley Schoolhouse, District No. 66, Brown County, is located on what was once a portion of Mr. S.'s farm, the land being donated by him for this purpose. The building was erected in 1876, at a cost of $600. It is a handsome frame structure, well supplied with modern school furniture, and has a seating capacity of fifty. Miss Kittie Jones (now Mrs. Harvey Richard) was the first, and R. S. Finley is the present teacher.

HENRY SMITH, farmer, Section 26, P. O. Emmett, was born fifty miles north of Philadelphia, in Northampton Co., Pa., January 3, 1832. Farming has been his occupation always - first in his native State, then Ohio, afterward in Illinois, and finally, in the spring of 1880, he came to Kansas. During the spring of the year following he removed to his present farm, which contains 213 acres, all under a high state of cultivation and excellently improved. Mr. Smith is extensively engaged in stock raising, which he has found to be a profitable investment, and for convenience in pasturing the same he has his farm divided into fields by cross fences. Mr. Smith was married in Illinois, in 1858, to Miss Emma Rork, a native of Ohio, Mr. Smith and his family are members of the Christian Church. They have four sons - William H., Curtis L., Walter E. And Charles F.

JAMES D. STANLEY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 27, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1837, and lived in his native State until March, 1871, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Willis. He was married in Union County, Ohio, in 1859, to Miss M. R. McNeil, a native of Ohio. They have five children whose names are - Mary, married to Frank Willis, a son of Hon. M. C. Willis, a native of Kansas and a resident of Brown County; Clara, Alice, Florence and Luelia. "Willow Grove Stock Farm," Mr. Stanley's beautiful home and 400-acre farm lies four miles southwest of the prosperous town of Willis. It is in high cultivation and finely improved with orchards, fences, buildings, meadows, groves, etc. Mr .Stanley raises about 5,000 bushels of corn and a good wheat crop, feeds two car loads of steers and 150 hogs; has large, well grassed pastures and grazes a good string of high grade cattle; has a group of unusually fine buildings, his house and basement barn being among the very best in the county. Stables most of his stock, and is building up a superior herd of thoroughbred Short-horns, Merinos and Poland-China hogs; and is raising some fine thoroughbred Norman horses. He is one of the progressive, successful, thorough-going farmers of this country, and pays a high compliment to Brown County.

T. W. STANLEY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 29, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1846, and lived in his native State until his twenty-second year and then removed to Benton County, Iowa, where he resided two years and thence removed to Adams County, in the same State, where he resided four years. In the spring of 1875 he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Willis. He was married in Kenton, Hardin Co., Ohio, May 23, 1867, to Miss S. A. Cusic, a native of Harrison County, Ohio. Mr. Stanley owns a fine stock and grain farm of 360 acres. It is all enclosed, in good state of cultivation, and is well supplied with timber and water, the Delaware River flowing through the southwest corner of the farm. "Mission Hill Stock Farm," as this magnificent estate is called, has good improvements, embracing among others a neat, comfortable and cosy home, a large frame barn 18x50, stock stables, sheds and lots, granaries, corn cribs, handsome groves, and one of the finest and most productive orchards in this section. This orchard contains 160 apple trees, was planted seven years ago, and for the last three years has been in bearing. Mr. Stanley grows from 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 bushels of wheat, 450 bushels of oats and 300 bushels of rye early; keeps form 40 to 50 stock cattle, 50 to 75 stock hogs, 20 head of good horses, and the finest and largest lot of Merino sheep in Brown County, about 400 in number, many of them being high grades and thoroughbreds. Mr. Stanley is a practical, prosperous and enterprising farmer, a good and useful citizen, and an intelligent, upright and honorable man.

JOHN C. STAPLETON, dealer in grain, lumber and coal, Baker, was born in Logan County, Ill., in 1848, where he resided until August, 1868, when he removed to Kansas, locating in Powhattan Township, Brown County, where he resided until 1878, when he removed to Monona County, Iowa, where he resided until August, 1882, when he returned to Kansas and located at Baker, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is an exemplary member of the Christian Church. He is also a member of Mount Pulaski Lodge, No. 87, A., F. & A. M., of Logan County, Ill. He was married in Logan County, Ill., in the fall of 1867, to Miss Sarah H. McKinney, a native of Illinois. They have five children living - William Franklin, Lillie Luella, Ernest A., Virgie O., and Nellie Almeta. Mr. Stapleton has been engaged in dealing in grain, lumber, and coal ever since he located in the young and thriving town of Baker. During this time he has handled and shipped to St. Louis and Chicago 110,000 bushels of corn, and 2,000 bushels of small grain; has sold thirty car loads of coal, and over fifty car loads of lumber, all of which was used in Baker and vicinity. Mr. Stapleton leads the trade in his specialties in his neighborhood, attends strictly to business, and being always prompt in paying his bills, and honest and fair in his dealings, he has fairly won the respect of all.

LEONARD T. WHITE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 24, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Robinson, was born in Fleming County, Ky., November 21, 1819, and lived in his native State until the winter of 1841-42, and then removed to Peoria County, Ill., where he was engaged in farming and butchering. He resided in Illinois until 1869, and on the 1st day of April of that year became a resident of Kansas, locating in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He is a member of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. He was Justice of the Peace of Mission Township a short time and Superintendent of Public Highways of Road District No. 1, Mission township, one term. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company E, Seventy-seventh Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He entered this company as a private, and was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He enlisted August 14, 1862, at Peoria, Ill., and was discharged at Springfield, Ill., June 23, 1865. He took part in the battles of Magnolia, Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, and the battles at and around Vicksburg. In the disastrous Red River expedition under Gen. Banks, he was captured in the engagement at Sabine Cross-roads by the rebel forces under the command of Kirby Smith. After his capture he was taken to Camp Ford, Texas, where he was held as a prisoner of war over thirteen long and weary months ere he was paroled. After his parole he marched, in company with over 1,000 of his comrades, from the rebel prison to Shreveport, La., a distance of 200 miles, where they embarked on an old Mississippi River boat, the General Quitman, for New Orleans. After they had proceeded on their voyage but a single day it was found that the wheels of the crazy old steamer had given out and needed rebuilding. The ex-prisoners accordingly landed, found an old sawmill, which they repaired, and with characteristic Yankee ingenuity and skill, proceeded to manufacture new wheels for the boat. After the repairs on the steamer were completed, the prisoners again proceeded on their voyage as far as the mouth of the Red River, where they were formally exchanged, and from where they proceeded on another craft to the Crescent City. Immediately after arriving in New Orleans, Mr. White was sent to Springfield, Ill., where he was discharged form the service, and then proceeded to his home. He was married December 29, 1847 in Peoria County, Ill., to Miss Minerva Smith, a native of Kentucky. They have had four children, three of whom are living - James L., a resident of Mission township, Brown County, and married to Miss Eunice E. Buck, a native of Illinois; John Runyon, died in infancy; Luella Jane, married to George H. Norton, a native of New York and a resident of Brown County; and Cornelius J., a resident of Robinson Township, Brown County, married to Miss Ella S. Proctor, a native of Kansas. Mr. White and his sons together own 427 acres of fine upland, all lying together in close proximity in Mission and Robinson townships. This tract of land is superbly watered by numerous springs which empty into White's Branch of Wolf River. The tract is admirably calculated for a stock farm, and is improved by comfortable and commodious buildings, orchards, fences, etc. Mr. White raises 2,200 bushels of corn, 2,600 bushels of wheat, and 500 to 600 bushels of oats; he feeds from fifty to seventy-five head of the best Poland-China hogs. He plows keep, rotates his crop, keeps half a dozen fine Durham milch cows, a dozen horses, among which are some fine Normans, a yard of fine poultry, and is as near a systematic, thorough, and model farmer as there is in Brown County.

MARTIN CLEVELAND WILLIS, farmer and stock raiser, Section 34, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Kennekuk, Atchison County, was born in Claiborne County, Tenn., July 20, 1831, and lived in his native State until the year 1855, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, near Charleston, where he resided one winter and then removed to his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is also a member of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 35, A., F & A. M. He was a member of the House of the Kansas Legislature, Sessions of 1866-67 and 1874-75 and Commissioner of Brown County two terms. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a Captain in the Nineteenth Regiment, Kansas Militia, in 1864. He was married in 1852 in Union County, Tenn., to Miss Elizabeth Carter, a native of Granger County, Tenn. They have five children living, whose names are - Francis Lafayette, married to Miss Mary Stanley, a native of Ohio; Christopher Columbus, William D., Susan Mary, married to William R. Honnell, a native of Kansas, and John D. "Locust Grove," as the magnificent estate of Mr. Willis is called, contains 720 acres. It lies one mile north of Kennekuk, Atchison County, and five miles south of Willis, Brown County. The farm is surrounded by substantial fences; is in a good state of cultivation and is well supplied with timber, fine building stone, and plenty of pure water, Willis and other creeks flowing through the farm. The estate is finely improved by a handsome stone residence, containing twelve rooms, a large frame barn 75x100 feet; good outbuildings and splendid orchards and groves. Mr. W. grows from 6,000 to 8,000 bushels of corn, 3,000 bushels of small grain, keeps 50 to 75 stock cattle, 150 stock hogs and 20 head of horses. Esquire Willis was one of the founders of Willis and the town was named after him. He is one of Brown's honored sons, an exemplary, high-toned gentleman, and is very popular in his county.

[TOC] [part 32] [part 30] [Cutler's History]