KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 30

[TOC] [part 31] [part 29] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - MISSION TOWNSHIP (FERRY - LITTREAL).

CHARLES L. FERRY, farmer and stockraiser, Section 17, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Walworth County, Wis., in July, 1843, and lived in his native State until his nineteenth year, when he entered the Union army as a member of Company I, Twenty-eighth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Elkhorn, Wis., August 15, 1862, and being discharged at Brownsville, Texas, August 23, 1865. He participated, among others, in the battles of Little Rock, Helena and Camden, Ark., and a number of minor engagements. After his discharge he returned to his home in Wisconsin, where he resided until October 12, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church of Willis. He was married May 8, 1871, in Brown County, to Miss Millie Ide, a native of Luzerne Co., Pa. They have two children, named Maggie Alice and Cora Adell. Maple Grove Stock Farm, as Mr. Ferry's fine upland farm is called, contains 200 acres and lies one mile south west of Willis. It is entirely enclosed by a handsome hedge, is in a good state of cultivation, is well supplied with water and has good improvements. On the north side of the dwelling is a handsome grove, containing 1,500 fine maple trees. Mr. F. devotes his attention exclusively to raising corn, hogs and horses. He grows from 4,000 to 4,500 bushels of corn yearly, his corn last year averaging sixty bushels to the acre throughout; keeps 150 to 200 stock hogs and nine head of fine horses. Mr. Ferry is an earnest, thorough and practical farmer, a prosperous and leading citizen, and a good neighbor.

J. J. FINLEY, senior member of the firm of J. J. & W. Finley, live stock dealers, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 20, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1842, and lived in his native State until the spring of 1873, when he removed to Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1862, to Miss Sarah M. Houston, a native of Ohio. They have five children, who are named Eva L., Andrew, Newton, Elizabeth and Anson. Hickory Grove Stock Farm, as the splendid 320-acre estate of Mr. Finley is called, lies three and a half miles southwest of the prosperous new town of Willis. It is one of the finest farms in the township and has handsome improvements, among which are an elegant residence, a large frame bank barn 40x64 feet, and other good outbuildings. Mr. F. is one of the largest and most extensive dealers in and raisers of stock in this section of the country. He grows 4,000 to 5,000 bushels of corn and 800 to 1,000 bushels of small grain yearly, has 70 acres in timothy and clover and 100 in prairie grass, feeds five to six car-loads of cattle, keeps 75 to 100 head of stock cattle, 150 to 200 stock hogs and 18 head of horses. At the head of his stud of fine horses stands the fine thoroughbred English coach horse, "Captain." He is an animal of superior personal traits and of pure lineage. Mr. Finley is an intelligent, thorough and practical farmer and stock-breeder, a useful citizen and an honorable and upright man.

GIFT & ZIMMERMAN, wagon and carriage makers and general blacksmiths, Willis. This firm is composed of two of Willis' most enterprising and industrious young mechanics. Mr. C. William Gift, the senior member of the firm, was born in St. Joseph, Mo., November 7, 1861, where he lived until 1874, when his parents removed to Kansas, locating in the city of Hiawatha, where Mr. G. attended the High School. Here also he learned his trade with his father, Mr. R. H. Gift, one of the oldest carriage makers in the State. After serving his apprenticeship he was employed in his father's shop until September 28, 1882, when he removed to Willis, where he entered into partnership with Mr. Edward Zimmerman, a well known blacksmith and skillful horse shoer. Mr. Zimmerman was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, in 1860, and lived in his native State until his ninth year., when his parents removed to Kansas, locating four and one-half miles southeast of Hiawatha, where Mr. Z. lived eleven years, during this time attending the public and graded schools in Hiawatha Township, Brown County. He learned his trade with Mr. H. B. Troxell, a skillful blacksmith of the city of Hiawatha. After serving his time he removed to Willis, where he and his partner opened up their extensive business. They own their buildings, the main shop being 16x70 feet, with a handsome office in the rear, and an adjoining paint shop, 20x20 feet. They are skillful mechanics, do a rushing trade, and stand as high as regards credit and moral character as any young men in the town of Willis.

MAJOR G. HAM, teacher, Willis, was born October 16, 1848, in Fleming County, Ky. Came to Kansas with his parents, Malcolm and Nancy A. Ham, in March, 1857, and settled on a farm in Atchison County, Section 13, Grasshopper Township, where his parents still reside. He received a liberal education, attending the State Normal School at Emporia, Kan., from 1869 to 1870. He was engaged in teaching in Atchison County, with the exception of one year in Brown County, for four years having had charge of the school at Willis. In 1864, Mr. Ham went to Colorado, where he enlisted at Denver, in the Second Volunteer Cavalry, Company K, and served till the close of the rebellion. He has served two years as Justice of the Peace of Grasshopper Township, Atchison county, and one term as Clerk of the same. He is a strong prohibitionist, and has always taken an active part in the Temperance movement of the State. Mr. Ham and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Ham is a daughter of David and Nancy Kessler, of Kennekuk. They were married in April, 1875. Her name Mary C. They have two children - Nancy A. And William B.

ELDRED HARRINGTON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 32, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Baker, was born in Walworth County, Wis., in 1840, and lived in his native State until the fall of 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Christian Church of Baker. In politics Mr. Harrington is Democratic and was the candidate of this party in 1874, for Lieutenant Governor of the State. He is a member of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. He participated in the last war as a member of Battery L. First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, and was enlisted at Janesville, Wis., in the summer of 1864, and discharged at Washington, D. C., April 28, 1865. He was married in Elkhorn, Wis., August 19, 1864, to Miss Amorette Powers, a native of Wisconsin. They have three children, whose names are: Grant W., Wynne P. And Jessie O. Mr. Harrington owns two fine farms lying in Mission Township. The home farm contains 250 acres, and farm No. 2, 320 acres. These farms are all enclosed, all in cultivation, well improved and well supplied with water and timber. On the home farm is an elegant residence, a good frame barn, granary, corn cribs, windmills, stock sheds, lots, etc. Mr. H. devotes his entire attention to raising corn, fine grade cattle and hogs. He grows from 5,000 to 10,000 bushels of corn yearly, feeds form three to five car loads of cattle, keeps forty to fifty fine grade cattle, 100 hogs and eight head of work horses. He has 240 acres in pasture, eighty acres in timothy and clover, and the remainder in prairie grass. Mr. Harrington is one of Brown's representative men and is well known to nearly every person in the county. He is a man of wide influence, stands pretty well up to the top in financial matters, is a model farmer and possesses an enviable reputation as a business man and citizen.

JAMES H. HAYES, farmer and stock raiser, Section 33, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Hiawatha, came to Kansas, in April, 1881, and located on a farm in Mission township, where he has since resided. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the G. A. R. He took part in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company M, First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and enlisted February 29, 1864, at Chillicothe, Ohio. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, September 28, 1865. He participated in the battles of Ebenezer Church, Selma, Ala, Columbus, the Atlanta Campaign and other minor engagements. Mr. Hayes was born in Ross County, Ohio, February 27, 1840, and resided in his native State until he came to Kansas. He has been married twice, the first marriage took place in March, 1861, in Ross County, Ohio, to Miss Susanna E. Weller, a native of Ohio. She died January 13, 1864; by this marriage he had two children, one of whom is living, Bertha A. The second marriage occurred April 19, 1866, in Ross County, Ohio, to Mrs. Martha E. Hermon, a native of Ohio, five children was the result of his marriage, who are all living: Nettie Bell, Lizzie Gertrude, Mary L., Theodore Clifford and William Earl. Mr. Hayes owns a choice farm of eighty acres, it is all enclosed, and has sixty acres under cultivation, the remainder being pasture land. The property is well supplied with excellent water, having a good well and has a branch of Wolf River flowing diagonally across it. There is a small orchard on the farm, which is well supplied with fruit trees. The improvements consist of a comfortable frame house, stock stable, granary, etc. Mr. Hayes had on the farm on which he resides at present thirteen acres in spring wheat this season, which yielded only seventy-eight bushels. He also had two acres in oats, which averaged thirty-five bushels, and fifty-seven acres in corn, which averaged fifty-five bushels to the acre.

JAMES HITE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 36, Township 3, Range 16, P. O. Baker, was born in Marion County, Ohio, February 12, 1837, and lived in his native State until the fall of 1853, when he removed to Tazewell County, Ill., where he resided until the spring of 1869, when he removed to Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of Star of Hope Lodge No. 1338, K. of H. He is also a member Hiawatha Post, No. 130, G. A. R. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company F, Eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Pekin, Ill., in July, 1861, and was discharged at Springfield, Ill, in May, 1865. He took part in the battles of Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Port Gibson, Raymond, Miss, Jackson, Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg, Fort Blakesly, Spanish Fort, and other minor engagements. At Fort Donelson he was severely wounded from the effects of which he suffers to-day (sic). After his discharge he returned to his home in Illinois, where he resided two years and then came to Kansas. He was married in Pekin, Ill., April 4, 1864, to Miss Mary E. Powers, a native of Schuller County, Ill. They have five children, named: - Cora Bell, Berth C., Clara G., William Morrill, and Chester Albert. "Cedar Lawn" as Mr. Hite's fine 320-acres estate is called adjoins the site of the prosperous new town of Baker. It is all enclosed with substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation and is well watered by springs, wells and Hite's branch of the Delaware, which flows in a southwesterly direction through the farm. The property is handsomely improved by a neat and cosy residence, a fine, large, new and convenient frame barn 40x58 feet, good outbuildings and magnificent groves and orchards. Mr. H. grows 5,000 to 7,000 bushels of corn and 2,000 bushels of small grain yearly, feeds two car loads of cattle, keeps seventy-five to 100 head of fine grade stock cattle, 175 stock hogs and sixteen head of fine horses. Mr. Hite is a veteran of the last war, an honest, intelligent and practical farmer, a prominent and prosperous citizen and is well and favorably spoken of in his community.

JESSE HOLT, farmer and stock raiser, Section 1, township 4, Range 16, P. O. Baker, was born in Knox Connty (sic), Ohio, in 1844, and lived in his native State until his eighth year, when his parents removed to Tazewell County, Ill., where he resided until January, 1871, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He participated in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company B, Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was enlisted at Delavan, Ill., August 7, 1862, and was discharged at Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill., June 24, 1865. He took part in the battles of Stone River and Chickamauga. In the last named battle he was wounded and captured by the enemy; lying on the field for three weeks previous to his removal to Libby Prison. Here he was confined for a short time, and then removed to the Confederate General Hospital, and shortly thereafter was paroled. He subsequently rejoined his regiment at Kenesaw Mountain, but was never able to do duty again. After his discharge he returned to his home in Illinois, where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Kein, Ill., November 3, 1868, to Miss Nancy H. Hite, a native of Marion County, Ohio. They have two children, names Elmer C. and Edna M. Mr. Holt owns a choice upland farm of eighty acres lying one mile south of the flourishing town of Baker. It is enclosed by substantial fences; is in a good state of cultivation; is well supplied with water, and is improved by a neat and cosy cottage, a new and convenient frame barn, 28x40; good out-buildings, and fine groves and orchards. Mr. Holt grows 2,000 to 2,500 bushels of corn and a small quantity of small grain, yearly; keeps half a dozen milch (sic) cows, 40 to 50 stock hogs, and 8 head of fine horses. Among his horses is the famous Clydesdale horse, "Commodore," an animal of fine traits and pure lineage, weighing 1,700 and a fine dapple brown in color. Mr. Holt is a veteran of the last war, an earnest, thorough and practical farmer, a good citizen and well and favorably known.

REV. W. H. HONNELL, missionary for Presbyterian Board in bounds of Larned Presbytery, P. O. Everest. The two brothers, Rev. William H. Honnell and Henry W. Honnell are a family of eight brothers and three sisters who all reached married life and mature years except the youngest brother, who died a soldier in the Andersonville prison at the age of eighteen. The widowed mother, when taunted by a rebel sympathizer (when the news came that of her four sons in the war one, Rev. William H. was at death's door by sickness, one, Capt. T. C., wounded in battle at Chickamauga, and one dead in Andersonville) whether she did regret sending her boys, with smothered tears, replied; "No! I have sent four of them, and rather than have this Union destroyed by traitors I will send the other four, even if not one of them ever returns to me." From such a mother the three Honnell brothers and their only surviving sister, Mrs. George McNeal, all now of Brown County, Kas., received their life and early Christian training. And it is not surprising that they are minister, elder, deacon and earnest workers in the Presbyterian Church. The first two named came first in early childhood from Greene County, Pa., and grew up and were educated in Shelby County, Ohio. The elder is a graduate of Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio, and of Danville Theological Seminary in Kentucky. After his graduation and when he was called to decide his future scenes of labor in the min'stry "that divinity that shapes our ends" decided for him and cast his lot in Kansas. It was the intention of the writer to make copious extracts from a paper read before the Synod of Kansas at the twenty-fifth anniversary of the organization of the first presbytery in the Territory, held in Ottawa in October, 1882, giving a few recollections of scenes in the early adventures of a life full of manifold labors on battlefields and missionary life in the South and in Kansas, but lack of time and space forbids. Two incidents in his life, however, cannot be passed over in silence. The first, that after years spent in Kansas border war, while temporarily in Kentucky, he had the honor of preaching the first sermon in Camp Dick Robinson, on August 10, 1861, under threat of arrest for doing so, by Gov. Beriah McGoffin. That military assembly, thus consecrated by prayer, broke the neutrality of Kentucky. He was not only in the siege of Knoxville, but was the chaplain of Walford's Cavalry, which headed the ride after and capture of John H. Morgan and his command after twenty-three days and nights through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio.

G. Y. JOHNSON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 6, Township 3, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Pike County, Ill., in 1841, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year, when he entered the Union army as a member of Company H, Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, being enrolled at Springfield, Ill., in June, 1862, and discharged in June, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. He participated in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Franklin, Spring Hill, Nashville and numerous minor engagements. Mr. Johnson was wounded thrice while in the service and was a brave and faithful soldier. He entered the service as a private and was discharged as Orderly Sergeant of his company. After his discharge he returned to his Illinois home where he resided until April, 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. He was married in 1869, in Vinton, Iowa, to Miss Kitty Haines, a native of Centre County, Pa. They have one child, a daughter, whose name is Gracie. Avondale, the home and 325-acre stock farm of Mr. Johnson, is handsomely located on Wolf River, eight miles south of Hiawatha, and is one of the most valuable stock farms in the county. He has 100 acres of woodland which affords fine range and shelter for stock, an abundance of clear running water, thirty acres in clover and timothy and grows 8,000 to 10,000 bushels of corn which he feeds to the four or five car loads of steers and pigs annually sold from the farm. In addition to cultivating his own land he also farms 100 acres of rented land. The attraction of the estate is the Avondale herd of forty thoroughbred Short-horns, which Mr. Johnson has been breeding with much care and is composed of White Rose, Arabella, Phyllis, Rose of Sharon and other popular families. At the head of the herd is the superb Young Mary bull, Parole, which, for superior individual traits, is probably the finest animal ever brought into the county. There are some very handsome cows and heifers in the herd, which altogether is an honor to the breeder and to Brown County. Mr. Johnson is not only a spirited and intelligent breeder, but takes great interest in the advancement of general husbandry and is one of the public spirited representative men of the county.

HORATIO W. JOHNSON, farmer and stock raiser, Sections 19 and 20, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Yankee Springs, Barry Co., Mich., in 1845, and lied in his native State until July 1, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Willis. He was married in Waterville, Marshall Co., Kans., December 28, 1870, to Miss Elizabeth Adams, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, a niece of Judge Franklin G. Adams, secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. They have four children, whose names are - Nora L., Ray T., Norman S. and Samuel Adams. Walnut Grove, as the fine 280-acre estate of Mr. Johnson is called, lies four and a half miles southwest of the thriving town of Willis. It is a magnificent farm, and is enclosed by a fine hedge and substantial fences; is in a high state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water by wells, springs and a branch of the Delaware, which flows in a southwesterly direction through the farm. The improvements are first-class (sic) in every particular, embracing among others, a new and elegant modern frame residence, a large frame barn, stock stables, sheds and lots, pastures, and splendid groves and orchards. Mr. Johnson grows 4,000 to 5,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 to 1,500 bushels of small grains yearly, has 120 acres in timothy and clover and bluegrass pastures, cuts from 25 to 40 tons of hay yearly, feeds 2 car loads of cattle, keeps 60 to 75 stock cattle, 100 to 150 fine Poland-China hogs and a dozen head of horses. For the last four years Mr. J. has been engaged in shipping hogs and cattle to the markets in Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago. He has shipped during the past year 20 car loads of hogs and 10 car loads of fat cattle. He is also an extensive breeder of fine cattle and pure Poland-China hogs. At a stock sale of Hereford, Polled Angus and Aberdeen cattle, held in Kansas City, April 25, 26, 27, 1883, Mr. Johnson purchased the fine thoroughbred young bull, Beecher, No. 72, bred by M. C. Cochran, of Canada, and the fine young heifer, Lady Hopeful, No. 57, of the same stock and bred by the same breeder. Mr. Johnson is one of Brown's earnest, intelligent, progressive and model farmers, an influential, popular and prominent citizen, and has a high standing in his community.

SMITH R. JOHNSON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 20, Township 4, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born, in 1847, in Yankee Springs, Barry Co., Mich., and lived in his native State until the spring of 1871, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Mission Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He has been Trustee of Mission Township one term, and is now serving his second term. He was married in Yankee Springs, Mich., February 21, 1873, to Miss May L. Gates, a native of New York. Rose Lawn, as the splendid 160-acre farm of Mr. Johnson is called, lies four and a quarter miles southwest of the thriving town of Willis. It is enclosed by a handsome hedge, is in a good state of cultivation, is well supplied with water, and has handsome improvements, among which are a new and elegant modern frame residence, surrounded by a beautiful lawn, embowered in evergreens, shade trees, shrubbery and rare roses, a fine large barn and other outbuildings. Mr. J. grows 2,000 to 3,000 bushels of corn and 700 to 1,000 bushels of small grain yearly, keeps 50 to 60 stock cattle, 200 stock hogs and 12 head of fine horses. He is an intelligent, earnest and go-ahead farmer, an honorable and useful citizen, and is a strong, popular man in the community in which he resides.

LESTER M. KING, junior member of the firm of Small & King, contractors and builders, was born in Marion County, Iowa, August 23, 1861, and lived in his native State until 1869, when he removed to Cass County, Neb., where he lived until 1876. He then returned to Keokuk, Iowa, where he lived until the fall of 1881, when he returned to Cass County, Neb., where he resided until May, 1882, when he removed to Willis, Brown County, where he aided in erecting the Missouri Pacific Railway depot, and where he has resided since, and in connection with Mr. Albert D. Small, his partner, has carried on an extensive business. He is well known for his sterling social and business qualities.

GILBERT KIPP, farmer and stock raiser, Section 32, township 3, Range 17, P. O. Willis, was born in Westchester County, N. Y., in 1833, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, and then removed to Lacily County, Ill., where he was engaged in farming and where he resided until the spring of 1871, when he removed to Kansas, locating in the city of Hiawatha where he resided one year and then removed to Hiawatha Township, Brown County, where he also resided one year. He then removed to his farm in Mission Township in the same county, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Star of Hope Lodge, No. 1338, K. of H. He was married January 23, 1867, in Earlville, Ill., to Miss Jennie Currier, a native of Illinois. They have three children living, whose names are: Benjamin L., Ella E. and Mary Estella. Mr. Kipp owns a fine upland farm of 106 2/3 acres lying in Mission Township, two miles from the new town of Baker and three miles from the thriving town of Willis. It is all enclosed, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water. North of the dwelling is a fine grove of catalpa, cottonwood and maple trees. From the same portion of the farm a magnificent view of the city of Hiawatha and the promising new towns of Baker and Willis can be had. The farm has good improvements and a thrifty young orchard covering four acres, well supplied with fruit trees of various varieties. Mr. K. grows 2,000 to 3,000 bushels of corn and 400 bushels of small grain yearly, keeps half a dozen milch (sic) cows, 100 stock hogs and 7 head of fine horses. Mr. Kipp is an earnest, progressive and intelligent farmer, a well-to-do citizen and is favorably spoken of by his neighbors.

J. W. KIPP, junior member of the firm of Chapman & Kipp, dealers in general merchandise, groceries, boots and shoes, etc., etc., Willis, was born in Lacily County, Ill., December 7, 1857, and lived in his native State until his seventeenth year and then became a resident of Kansas, locating in Mission township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Star of Hope Lodge, No. 1338, K. of H., of Hiawatha. He was married in Brown County, in 1879, to Miss Lauretta J. Hannah, a native of Illinois. They have two children, whose names are: Ira and Lawrence. Mr. Kipp and his partner, Mr. N. E. Chapman, are men of splendid energy and business enterprise, are doing the leading trade in their town and are the strongest and most popular business firm in this section of the county.

W. W. LITTREAL, M. D., physician and surgeon, and senior member of the firm of Littreal & Bowman, druggists, Baker, was born in Hardin County, Ky., in 1852, and lived in his native State until the fall of 1878, when he removed to Kansas, locating at Mount Pleasant, Brown County, near Whiting, where he resided until November, 1882, when he removed to Baker, in the same county, where he has resided and followed his profession since. Dr. Littreal received his early education in the graded schools of his native county, and subsequently attended Lynland College, near Glendale, Hardin Co., Ky., where he graduated in 1873. Immediately after his graduation he began reading medicine with Dr. R. D. Overstreet, an eminent practitioner of Uptonsville, Ky. He read with his preceptor the usual length of time, and then attended medical lectures at the Louisville University, graduating from this institution and receiving the degree of M. D. in the spring of 1876. After completing his medical studies he commenced the practice of his profession in Nolin, Hardin Co., Ky., where he resided two years and then came to Kansas. He is a devoted member of the Christian Church of Baker, of which he is one of the deacons. He is also a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He was married at Nolin, Hardin Co., Ky., in 1877, to Miss Rosa Hardin, a daughter of Stephen Hardin a prominent farmer of Hardin County, and a nephew of Ben Hardin. They have one child, a daughter, whose name is Odie B. Dr. Littreal is the only physician in Baker, and as he has no opposition and is popular in the community and a man of acknowledged skill in his profession, is doing a large and constantly increasing practice. He is also senior member of the firm of Littreal & Bowman, dealers in drugs and books, stationery, wall paper, paints, oil, glass, and queensware. They have no opposition and are doing a large trade.

[TOC] [part 31] [part 29] [Cutler's History]