KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 19

[TOC] [part 20] [part 18] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (HARPER - WILSON).

L. G. HARPER, farmer, Section 3, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Marion County, Ohio, August 4, 1851, and lived in his native State until the spring of 1861 when his parents removed to Kansas, locating in Irving Township Brown County, where Mr. Harper has resided since. He was married in Brown County, March 3, 1874, to Miss Rettie H. Cyphers, a native of Morrow County, Ohio; they have two children - James Ellsworth and Myrtle May. Mr. Harper is the fortunate owner of a fine upland farm containing eighty acres. It is all in cultivation and is surrounded by substantial fences. Two good wells supply the water for stock and household requirements. The orchard covers four acres and contains 100 apple, 400 peach, 200 cherry, and a few plum and pear trees. The place is also well supplied with small fruits, such as raspberries, blackberries, etc. The improvements are of the very best in Irving Township and excel in point of neatness and style many others of more pretentious in his immediate neighborhood. They comprise a comfortable frame cottage, a first class and well arrange frame barn 16x24, granary, stock sheds, corn crib, etc., etc. The cottage is eligibly located and is surrounded by handsome evergreens and shrubbery, Mr. Harper raises 100 bushels of wheat, 300 to 400 bushels of oats, and 2,500 to 3,000 bushels of corn yearly. He is one of the enterprising and go-ahead young farmers of Brown. His farm and the improvements are beautiful to look upon and everything about the place is kept in neat and perfect order.

JOHN G. HOWARD, farmer and stock-raiser, proprietor of "Springdale" Stock Farm, Section 30, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. Jonesville, was born in Carter County, Ky., in 1842, but only lived in his native State until his second year, when his parents moved to Buchanan County, Mo., where Mr. Howard lived until the fall of 1862 when he came to Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, near Highland, where he resided ten years and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He took part in the last war as a member of Capt. Hunter's Company of Missouri Militia. He was enlisted at St. Joe., served nine months and subsequently re-enlisted in Capt. Karne's Company of Missouri Militia, served two months longer and was discharged at St. Joe. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place near Highland, Doniphan County, to Miss Nancy Jenkins, a native of Indiana, in 1865; she died in 1867; one child, who died in infancy, was the result of this marriage. The second marriage took place, in 1869, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Ann Eliza Copeland, a native of Missouri; they have had six children, five of whom are living - James M., William Edward, Elmira J., John Wesley, David Otis (died in August, 1878) and Roy E. Mr. Howard owns a large and fine upland farm of 529 acres equidistant (nine miles) from Rulo, Neb., Robinson, White Cloud, Padonia and Hiawatha. It is enclosed with substantial fences and has 300 acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture land. The water supply is excellent and consists of a number of good springs. The orchard is young and thrifty, covers eight acres and contains 700 fruit trees of various varieties. The improvements are good and consist of a new and comfortable frame cottage, frame barn 30x40 feet, wagon and buggy shed, smokehouse, granary and large corn crib and stock shed 28x124 feet. Mr. Howard feeds 85 head of cattle, 200 to 300 head of hogs, keeps 57 to 100 head of stock cattle, 100 head of stock hogs and 8 head of horses and mules. In addition to farming his own land he tills 140 acres of rented land. He raises 5,000 to 6,000 bushels of wheat, 600 bushels of oats, 200 to 300 bushels of rye, and 10,000 bushels of corn. Mr. Howard also owns three acres of town lots in one of the pleasantest and best portions of the city of Hiawatha. He is one of the prosperous farmers of Brown and from the $600 of original capital brought here from Missouri twenty-one years ago has acquired an estate worth at least $25,000.

ANDREW J. IDOL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 24, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Davidson County, N. C., August 30, 1835, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year and then removed to Lafayette County, Mo., where he lived nine months. He then became a resident of Kansas, locating in May, 1856, near White Cloud, Doniphan County, where he was engaged principally in farming and where he resided five years. In 1861 he went to Wall Walla City, Washington Territory, where he was engaged in mining and freighting until 1867, when he returned via San Francisco and the Isthmus of Panama to his North Carolina home, where he married, staid (sic) a short time and then returned to Kansas, locating on his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Baptist Church. He was married in Guilford County, N. C., in 1867, to Miss Eliza Payne, a native of North Carolina; they have three children living named Ettie, Frederic and Hubert. Mr. Idol owns a fine upland farm of 159 acres enclosed with substantial fences. The farm is in a good state of cultivation, is well watered, has two good orchards, and first class improvements, among which are a cozy and comfortable frame dwelling, containing nine rooms and surrounded by beautiful shade trees, evergreens and shrubbery, and conveniently arranged frame barn 24X30 feet, granary, corn cribs, etc., etc. Mr. Idol raises from 150 to 200 bushels of wheat, 4,000 to 5,000 bushels of corn; keeps 20 to 25 head of stock cattle, 60 to 75 head of stock hogs, and 5 horses and mules. He is an honest, industrious and intelligent farmer, a good citizen and neighbor, and is well and favorably known.

J. M. IDOL, farmer and stock raiser, Section 25, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, was born in April, 1833, near Salem, N. C., where he resided until his nineteenth year. He then removed to LaFayette County, Mo., where he resided for three years, and from there, in 1855, removed to Holt County, the same State, where he resided until January, 1856, when he became a resident of Kansas, being one of the original settlers of White Cloud. He resided near this city until the spring of 1861, when he went to Walla Walla Valley, W. T., where he remained seven years. He then returned to Kansas via Fort Benton, and located in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of White Cloud Lodge, No. 6, I. O. O. F; of White Cloud, No. 78, A., F. & A. M., and of Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M., of Hiawatha. He has been a member of the Board of School District, No. 8, of Brown County, for two terms, and Commissioner of the same County one term. He was married in Doniphan County in 1857, to Miss Nancy J. Hobbs, a native of Missouri. They have eight children, seven of whom are living - Luemma, married to Granville Arnold, a native of Kansas, and a resident of White Cloud; Flora, Edward, Cordella, James, died 1? July, 1867, at Fort Hawley, M. T., the most northern fort in the United States; Frank, William and Raymond. Mr. Idol owns two exceptionally fine farms in Irving Township, which adjoin each other; they contain 160 acres each, and rank with the best in Brown County; one of these farms at present is rented, while Mr. Idol resides on and cultivates the other himself. The buildings on the rented farm are first-class, while the improvements on the home farm are equal to any in the State, and consist of an elegant farm house and good outbuildings. This farm is in a high state of cultivation; has a thrifty orchard and superb fences. Mr. Idol feeds twenty-five steers and 150 hogs; raises excellent crops of wheat and corn, and is a model farmer; has made his means in this community and is a strong, influential representative man.

CLARENCE C. JONES, farmer and stock raiser, Section 35, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, April 2, 1849, and lived in his native State until October, 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married June 3, 1873, in Doniphan County, to Miss Mary I. Arnold, a native of Kansas, daughter of Dawson Arnold, Esq. They have had five children, one of whom is living and whose name is Myron J. Mr. J. has one of the finest upland farms in Irving Township. It contains eighty acres, is enclosed by good fences, and has seventy acres in cultivation, the remaining ten acres being meadow land. The supply of water is pure and abundant, and consists of two good wells and a fine spring. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the place, which contains 140 apple trees. The improvements are good, and consist of a handsome frame cottage, containing eight rooms, a good and convenient frame barn and granary, 18x22, corn cribs, wagon shed, etc. Mr. Jones raises from 200 to 250 bushels of wheat, 100 bushels of rye, 300 bushels of oats, 2,500 to 3,000 bushels of corn, keeps eight to ten head of stock cattle, forty to fifty head of hogs and four head of mules. He is a young and enterprising farmer, with lots of grit in his composition, and will yet rank among the foremost farmers of his section.

FORDYCE M. KEITH, lawyer, residence Section -, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., April 27, 1816, and lived in his native State until his seventeenth year, when his parents removed to Elyria, Lorain Co., Ohio, where he resided until the fall of 1836. He then removed to Cleveland, Cuyaboga County, in the same State, where he resided until the spring of 1840, when he located at Massillon, Stark County, in the same State, where he commenced the practice of law. Col. Keith received his education at Oneida Institute, New York, and at Oberlin College, Ohio. In 1836, he commenced reading law with Albert A. Bliss, of Elyria, Ohio, and concluded the reading of law in the office of Messrs. Wade & Wells, at Cleveland, and was admitted to the bar August 28, 1838. He resided and followed his profession at Massillon until the spring of 1854, when he removed to Jackson, Jackson County, in the same State, and entered upon the manufacture of iron, still however, continuing to practice his profession, and where he remained until the spring of 1862. During the greater part of the year 1861, Col. K. was actively engaged in making speeches in favor of, and in recruiting troops for the Union army. In the spring of 1862, he entered the United States Army, as Major of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry - this regiment being subsequently known as the First Ohio Heavy Artillery, and was promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of this regiment, in which position he was mustered out at the close of the war. While Major of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio, he was sent by order of Maj. Gen. Burnside to take command of Montgomery County, Ohio, where he remained in command during the Vallandingham troubles, a period of four or five months. Upon being relieved of this duty, he was ordered to take command of that portion of Kentucky lying opposite to Cincinnati, embracing four or five counties, where he remained until January, 1864; being then relieved, he was ordered to Knoxville, Tenn. Upon arriving at this place, he was ordered to take command as Provost Marshal of East Tennessee, in which position he remained until near the close of the war, when, with all others upon special duty in this department, he was ordered to his command, and to occupy the only gap in the extreme east of Tennessee and western part of North Carolina, left for the enemy to escape, it then being evident that the confederacy was about to collapse. After his discharge from the army, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, residing with his son, Lieut. U. S. Keith. Col. K. continued the practice of his profession until five years since, when owing to ill-health, he was obliged to relinquish all active business. He has one son, U. S. Keith, late a Lieutenant of the First Ohio Heavy Artillery, who enlisted at the beginning of the war, and served faithfully and with honor, until its close. Lieutenant K. was married, September 11, 1886, in Massillon, Ohio, to Miss Mary F. Grossman, a native of Massillon. They have four children living, whose names are - Minnie L., Ruby V. and Eddie and Charles, twins. Lieut. Keith ranks among the intelligent, progressive and liberal minded farmers of Brown, and is well and favorably known.

PETER L. LANDES, farmer and stock raiser, Section 3, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Hiawatha, was born in Whitehallville, Bucks Co., Pa., September 22, 1841, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year, when he removed to Elkhart County, Ind., where he resided four years and was engaged in farming. From Indiana he came, the 9th of February, 1869, to Kansas, locating on his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married February 4, 1866, in Columbiana, Ohio, to Miss Anna Culp, a native of the Buckeye State. They have six children living - Alice Isabel, Eliza Jane, Charles Urban, Norman, Hester and Martha. Mr. Landes owns two choice farms; one, the home farm, contains eighty acres, and the other 160. These are enclosed with good fences, are mostly in cultivation and rank among the best in Brown County. The water supply of both is excellent and cannot be surpassed, consisting of wells and springs. There is a fine orchard on each farm; that on the home farm has 200 apple, 1,000 peach and a number of pear and cherry trees. The orchard on the other farm contains 100 thrifty apple, and some peach, pear and cherry trees. The improvements on the home farm are a six roomed, comfortable and cozy frame dwelling, surrounded by numerous shade trees and evergreens. In close proximity to the house is a fine grove of native trees. The other improvements are a fine frame barn, 30x48 feet, granary, corn crib, smoke house, etc., etc. Mr. Landes raises from 700 to 800 bushels of wheat, 150 to 200 bushels of oats and 3,500 bushels of corn annually; feeds half a car load of steers, 60 to 100 head of hogs and keeps thirty-two head of stock cattle, sixty to seventy-five stock hogs and seven horses. There are a number of fine large spring branches on both his farms and they are well adapted for stock raising. Mr. Landes is an earnest, progressive working Pennsylvanian, who has fairly demonstrated what my be done in this country by intelligent and well directed labor.

JAMES N. MILLS, farmer and stock raiser, southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Hiawatha, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1834, but left his native State at an early age, when his parents removed to Illinois, where Mr. Mills resided about twenty years. He then went to Calaveras County, Cal., where he resided five years and was engaged in the lumber trade and in mining. From California he returned to his Illinois home, staid (sic) a short time, and in the year 1857 became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in 1861, in Missouri, to Miss Susan Davidson, a native of Missouri. They have had eight children, seven of whom are living - Laura Beil (married to Richard E. Dunn, a native of Missouri and a resident of Brown County), Sherman, Maggie, Bertie, Effie, James and Otis. Mr. Mills owns two fine farms, which together comprise 720 acres. These farms are all enclosed with substantial fences and are all in cultivation. They are well watered by Roy's Creek and numerous springs, wells and cisterns. The orchards cover eight acres and contain about 800 apples, 200 peach and a few pear and cherry trees. The improvements are first class in every particular and consist of a fine family mansion, containing eight rooms, surrounded with handsome shrubbery, evergreens and shade trees. The other improvements are a large frame barn, 44x74 feet, granaries, corn cribs, etc. etc. Farmer Mills does his own weighing and has a four-ton pair of Fairbank's scales in a convenient scale house, on which to do it. His farm is well supplied and equipped with all the improved modern farm machinery. He had 175 acres in small grain this year, which gave a fair yield, and 225 acres in corn, which yielded 12,000 bushels. He feeds on an average 100 head of cattle annually, and has done so for the past sixteen years. He feeds also 200 head of hogs, keeps seventy-five head of stock cattle and twenty-four head of horses and mules. Mt. Roy schoolhouse is situated on the southwest quarter of Section 4, on what was once a portion of Mr. Mill's property. This land was presented by him with his characteristic generosity and public spirit to the District for school purposes. The school building was erected in 1877 at a cost of about $500. It has a seating capacity of forty. Mr. I. S. Griswold is the teacher at present in charge of the school. Mr. Mills is one of the early pioneers of Brown County. He is a solid and prosperous farmer, and a prominent citizen, taking an active part in every project for the welfare of the community in which he lives.

WILLIAM PEARL MOORE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 34, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Nettlestead Hall, Suffolk, England, February 7, 1821, and lived in his native country until 1849, when he came to America, locating in Oshkosh, Wis., where he was engaged in farming, and where he resided until the fall of 1870 when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Episcopalian Church. He was married in Otley, Suffolk, England, May 5, 1842, to Miss Marian Last, a native of Suffolk, England; they have five children living whose names are - Pearl Bedwell, Emma Last, Annie Grace (married to Wilson Taylor, M. D., a native of Ohio, and practicing physician at Robinson, Kan.), Charles Walter and William Robert, twins. Mr. Moore owns a splendid upland farm of 320 acres. It is all enclosed with substantial fences and has 240 acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture land. There are a number of good wells, fine springs, and a young, thrifty orchard on the property. The improvements are first class and consist of a large and elegant brick mansion containing ten rooms, situated in the center of a beautiful lawn and surrounded by handsome shade trees and shrubbery. The other improvements are a convenient frame barn and granary 30x40, wagon sheds, corn cribs, etc. Mr. Moore raises from 500 to 800 bushels of oats, 600 to 800 bushels of wheat, 7,000 to 8,000 bushels of corn yearly; feeds a car load of cattle, keeps from 40 to 50 head of stock cattle, 50 to 75 head of stock hogs, and 12 to 14 head of horses and mules. Mr. Moore is the fortunate owner of a fine estate, and energetic and practical farmer, a thorough gentleman and stands high in the community in which he lives.

E. R. MORTON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 27, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, was born in Cooper County, Mo., August 22, 1844, and lived in his native State twenty five years and then removed to Kansas locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of White Cloud Lodge, No. 6, I. O. of O. F. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company I, Ninth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry and enlisted in the spring of 1862 at Macon City, and was discharged at St. Louis, Mo., in June, 1865. He took part in the battles of the Little Blue, Marais des Cygnes Newtonia, Booneville, Pea Ridge, and other minor engagements. He was wounded while in the United States service in an engagement at Black Foot, Howard Co., Mo. He was married in Jackson County, Mich., in February, 1870, to Miss M. M. Fosdick, a native of Michigan; they have four children whose names are - I. Frank, G. N., B. C. and T. C. Mr. Morton has a fine upland farm containing 160 acres in Irving Township, Brown Coutny, seven miles from White Cloud. The farm is all enclosed and has eighty acres in cultivation and eighty in pasture. There is plenty of running water on the farm. In addition to farming his own land he cultivates 320 acres of rented land adjoining his farm. He had ninety acres in fall wheat, which yielded this season 1,600 bushels; ten acres in oats, which yielded 550 bushels; and 190 acres in corn, which yielded 10,000 bushels. He feeds from 50 to 60 head of cattle, 175 to 200 head of hogs; keeps 50 head of stock cattle, 200 head of stock hogs, and 26 head of horses and mules. The improvements consist of a fine frame dwelling house, frame barn and outbuildings. He is one of the prosperous and representative farmers of Brown County, and is highly spoken of by his friends and neighbors.

EDWARD T. NOBLE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 9, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born August 7, 1849, in Edgar County, Ill., where he lived until his eleventh year, when his parents moved to Kansas, locating in White Cloud, Doniphan County, where they resided nine years. From there Mr. Noble removed to his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 159, A., F. & A. M., and of Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M., of Hiawatha. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place September 22, 1873, near White Cloud, to Miss Ida Nelblong, a native of Ohio. She died November 21 of the same year. The second marriage took place December 16, 1874, in Highland, Doniphan County, to Miss Sarah A. Close, a native of Ohio. They have had three children, two of whom are living, Arthur H. died August 15, 1882; Susan and Edward T, Jr. Mr. Noble owns one of the finest upland farms in this section. It contains 320 acres and is all enclosed with substantial fences, and all under cultivation except 120 acres, which is pasture and timber land. The property is well supplied with water, comprising springs and wells and Roy's Creek flowing through the west quarter of the farm. There is a fine young orchard on the place which covers about three acres and contains 200 apple, 150 peach, and a number of pear and cherry trees. The improvements consist of a handsome cottage dwelling house containing six rooms, with cellar, and surrounded by elegant evergreens, shrubbery and shade trees. The other improvements are a large barn, stock stable, granary, corn crib, and other outbuildings. There are two large feed lots on the farm amply supplied with running water for the stock and protected on all side by a natural growth of timber. Mr. Noble has 25 acres of timothy and clover, 50 acres of native grass, 20 acres of woodland, grows from 6,000 to 7,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 to 1,200 bushels of oats, and 600 to 800 bushels of wheat. He feeds 150 head of hogs, 60 to 75 head of steers, keeps 40 head of stock cattle, 8 to 10 head of horses and mules, and raises a few thoroughbred road horses. His farm is situated five miles north of the prosperous town of Robinson and is reached by some of the finest roads in Brown County. Within twenty rods of his dwelling is Williams' coal mine, which supplies half of the county with coal. Mr. Noble is a young, intelligent, energetic and thorough farmer. His grain fields, meadows, hedges, orchards, stockyards, etc., etc. all showing the impress of a master in good husbandry.

MATHEW DOUGLAS NOBLE, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. White Cloud, came to Kansas in the spring of 1857, locating at White Cloud, where he remained for fifteen years and was employed as superintendent of O. Bailey's pork packing establishment for ten years of this time. He then engaged in business for himself and for eight years was engaged in the cattle trade, shipping cattle and hogs to St. Louis, Chicago and Buffalo, N. Y., markets. At the end of this time he removed to his farm on Roy's Creek, in Brown County, where he resided until 1880, when he removed to his farm near White Cloud, where he resides at present. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 159, A., F. & A., M., and was one of the charter members of White Cloud Lodge No. 78. He was born in Bridgeport, Vt., March 6, 1822, and lived in his native town until his eighteenth year, when he removed to Paris, Ill., where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Edgar County, Ill., in the fall of 1844, to Miss Lydia Bassford, a native of Illinois. They have had seven children of whom but three are living, viz: Edward (married to Miss Sallie close, a native of Ohio), Mary, and Phoebe (married to Franklin Moore, a farmer, a Pennsylvanian by birth), living near Walnut Creek, Brown County. Mr. Noble has two farms which contain 480 acres. Both farms are rolling prairie, under fence, and in a good state of cultivation. His farm on Roy's Creek contains twenty-five acres of fine walnut and elm timber and also has a fine young apple orchard containing 200 trees. The improvements on this farm consist of a commodious frame dwelling house, a good barn, and other farm buildings. His farm near White Cloud has a small orchard containing about fifty apple trees. About twenty acres of this farm is pasture land, in which rises one of the finest springs in the State of Kansas. It never freeze and never runs dry.

HENRY CLAY PLOTNER, farmer and stock raiser, Section 2, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Berkley (sic)county, Va., December 17, 1844, but left his native State at an early age, his parents removing to Platte County, Mo., where they lived a number of years, and then removed to Holt County, in the same State, where Mr. P. resided until the fall of 1861, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he lived six years, and was engaged in farming. In 1870, he removed to Brown County, where he resided until 1873, and then removed to Phillips County, where he lived until 1875, when he returned to Irving Township, Brown County where he has resided since. He is Treasurer of School District No. 35, Brown County. During the war of the Rebellion he was a member of Company A, Thirteenth Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted September 20, 1862, at Troy, Doniphan County, and was discharged from the service in October, 1865, at Little Rock, Ark. Mr. Plotner's company was engaged in the battles of Cane Hill, Ark., November 28, 1862, Prairie Grove, Ark., December 7, 1862; in the raid on Van Buren, Ark., December 28, 1862, and was in the expedition in chase of the rebels, under the command of Gen. Cooper, in August, 1863. Mr. P. was married in White Cloud, January 24, 1866, to Miss Laura P. Harper, a native of Marion, Ohio. They have three children living - Charles E., Samuel and Benjamin Franklin. He owns a choice upland farm of 160 acres on the Hiawatha and White Cloud road, being twelve miles from the former and nine miles from the latter town. The farm is enclosed by substantial fences, is all in cultivation, and all plow land except three acres. It is well supplied with water, and has two fine orchards, which cover two acres and contain 160 apple, 500 peach, 50 cherry and a few plum trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the place, consisting of grapes, blackberries, strawberries and raspberries. Near the dwelling is a fine grove of native timber, containing 4,000 cottonwood and box-elder trees. The improvements are first class in every particular. There is a fine family mansion, containing six rooms, surrounded by handsome shrubbery, evergreens and shade trees, stock stable, corn crib, 12x35 feet, granary, etc. Mr. Plotner has good stock lots and pastures, keeps 25 head of stock cattle, 40 to 50 head of stock hogs and 6 horses and mules. He raises 600 bushels of wheat, 400 to 500 bushels of oats, 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn, and cuts 8 to 10 tons of timothy hay annually. Heckler schoolhouse, No. 35, is located on the quarter adjoining Mr. P.'s farm, and is only 100 rods from his dwelling. Mr. Plotner is a square, level-headed man, a model farmer, and stands high in the community in which he lives.

H. H. SPANGLER, teacher Prairie Roy schoolhouse, District No. 61, P. O. Robinson, was born near Berlin, Somerset Co., Pa., September 19, 1860, and lived in his native State until September 19, 1881, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. Since living in Kansas, Mr. Spangler has had charge of the Prairie Roy School in Irving Township, Brown County, and has given satisfaction to both the parents of his pupils and the superintendent of the schools of the county. He is a young man of culture and fine attainments, and received his education in the public and high schools of Somerset County, Pa., and at Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, in the same State.

ENOCH SPAULDING, farmer and stock raiser, Sections 24 and 25, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Scioto County, Ohio, in January, 1828, and lived in his native State but a short time when his parents moved to Jersey County, Ill., where Mr. S. lived until his twenty-first year. He then removed to Holt County, Mo., where he remained but a few months, when he enlisted as a bugler in Company C, (Capt. James Craig) First Missouri battalion of Cavalry, commanded by Col. Powell, of St. Charles, Mo. He enlisted in May, 1847, in Oregon, Mo., and was discharged at Fort Leavenworth, in the fall of 1848. Upon his return from Mexico, he returned to Illinois where he spent the winter, and in the spring of 1849, started for California, where, upon his arrival, he was engaged in mining and prospecting, until July, 1850. He then returned to Holt County, Mo., where he resided until October, 1855, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating at White Cloud, being one of the original members of the town company. While residing in White Cloud he was engaged in the hotel and livery business, and built, in connection with J. H. Utt, Esq., the first hotel in White Cloud. In the spring of 1869, he removed to his fine farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He is a member of White Cloud Lodge No. 6, I. O. O. F. He was married in August, 1850, in Holt County, Mo., to Miss Christina Dorland, a native of Ohio. They have seven children living, whose names are - Ida J., widow of D. G. Garlock, a native of New York; she has four children; Alfred R., married to Miss Julia Dunleavy, a native o New York; Cora, married to H. C. VanBuskirk, a native of Ohio and a resident of White Cloud; Lula, married to L. B. Keith, a native of Ohio and a resident of Seneca; Emma, Anna and Herman J. Mr. Spaulding owns two fine upland farms containing 320 acres, enclosed with substantial fences and well watered. There are two fine orchards on these farms which contain together, 300 bearing apple, 400 peach and a number of cherry, plum and pear trees. These farms are also well supplied with small fruits among which are grapes, gooseberries, raspberries, strawberries, etc. The improvements are first-class, and consist in part, of a fine frame family mansion, with brick basement, containing nine rooms, two-storied frame barn 30x40 feet, granary, corncribs, wagon and stock sheds, etc., etc. Mr. S. keeps from fifty to seventy-five head of stock cattle, the same number of hogs, and fifteen to twenty head of horses and mules. Mr. Spaulding is one of the pioneers of this section of Kansas, a veteran of the Mexican war, a California 49er, and withal, is a thorough, practical prosperous and intelligent farmer, a good citizen and a valuable man in the community in which he lives.

GEORGE A. STANSBURY, farmer, Section 17, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Baltimore, Md., January 15, 1827, and lived in his native State until 1837, when his father removed to Champaign County, Ohio, where Mr. Stansbury lived until 1855, when he removed to Henderson County, Ill., where he resided until the spring of 1857, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on the farm where he now resides, which he pre-empted on his first arrival in Kansas, paying for it by a land warrant obtained by his father, James B. Stansbury, for services in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Stansbury resided in Kansas until January of the next year, when he returned to Illinois, where he lived until March, 1881, when he returned to Kansas, and has since made his home on the farm where he resides at present. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Hiawatha. During the war of the Rebellion, Mr. Stansbury was Wagon Master of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, and enlisted at Bushnell, Ill., in June, 1861, and was discharged at Springfield, Ill., four years subsequently. He participated in all the battles and engagements of his command. He was married in Urbana, Ohio, in April 1868, to Mrs. Isabella Howell, a native of the State of New York. They have had two children, one of whom is living - James B. Mr. Stansburgy's farm contains 160 acres, mostly upland, all enclosed, and has sixty acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture and meadow land. The farm is well watered by Roy's Creek and numerous springs and wells. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the farm. The improvements consist of a comfortable frame dwelling house, one and one half stories high, stock stable, etc.

HARRISON STEELEY, farmer, P. O. Mount Roy, came to Kansas March 7, 1879, locating in Iowa Township, Donniphan County, and has resided in this vicinity ever since. He is a member of the German Reform Church. He was born near Bloomsburg, Columbia Co., Pa., March 12, 1834, and lived in his native State until he came to Kansas. He was married in Columbia County, Pa., in the fall of 1859, to Miss Elizabeth Gearhart, a native of Columbia County. They have four children, whose names are: Daniel Jacob, Diana (married to George McCauly, a native of Ohio), Stephen and Ellis. Mr. Steeley has a fine upland farm of eighty acres, which he has earned by hard work and frugality, being comparatively a poor man when he first came to Kansas. His farm is all under cultivation, and is all enclosed by substantial fences. His orchard contains 125 bearing apple trees, the same number of peach trees and twenty-five cherry trees, all of the finest and most prolific varieties. He has a good comfortable frame dwelling house, large barn, granary, corn crib and other buildings on his farm. He devotes his attention chiefly to raising corn and small grain. His wheat this year, 1882, averaged thirty-two bushels to the acre; his prospective yield of corn this summer is simply enormous.

JACOB S. STILWELL, farmer, Section 17, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Williams County, Ohio, June 11, 1842, and lived in his native State until 1859, when he came to Kansas and located in Doniphan County, where he resided until 1861. He then entered the Union army as a member of Company A, Seventh Regiment Kansas Cavalry, and was enlisted at Highland, Doniphan County, in June, 1861, and discharged from the service in October, 1862, at Corinth, Miss. After his discharge from the Seventh Kansas he returned to his old home in O Ohio, and while there again entered the United States Service as a member of Company E, Eighty-sixth Ohio Infantry, a six month regiment. He service out his time in this regiment and was discharged in Cleveland, Ohio. After being mustered out of the service he went to Nashville, Tenn., where he lived about seven months, and then again returned to Ohio where he stayed but a short time and then went to Henry County, Iowa, where he lived nine months. From Iowa he returned to Kansas and located in Brown County, where he has resided since. Mr. Stilwell came from a brave and patriotic family, his father and two brothers being members of the Union Army during the war of the Rebellion, besides himself. His father, William A. Stilwell, a native of Berkley (sic) Co., Va., was a member of Company A, Thirteenth Kansas Infantry, and died from disease contracted while in the service of his country in hospital at Cane Hill, Ark., although born on Southern soil he was an ardent Unionist. One of Mr. Stilwell's brothers, Stephen D., was a member of the same company (A, Seventh Kansas) with him, and was killed at the battle of Little Blue, November 10, 1861. William O., another brother, was a member of, and served a full term during the last war in the United States Regular Army, being a member of the Sixteenth United States Infantry. Mr. Stilwell participated in the battles of the Little Blue, Corinth and a number of minor actions and skirmishes. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 98, I. O. O. F. He was one of the charter members and has filled all the chairs of his lodge. He was Constable of Irving Township, Brown County, one term. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Oregon, Mo., October 21, 1866, to Miss Ruth A. Cole, a native of Ohio. Three children were the fruits of this marriage - Anna May, Ida Alice and Ruth A. The second marriage took place in Brimfield, Ind., February 10, 1874, to Miss Caroline Snyder, a native of Ohio. They have had two children, one of whom is living and whose name is George Martin. Mr S. owns a small but choice farm of eighty acres, which is all enclosed and all under cultivation. The farm is well watered, and has a fine young orchard which contains fifty apple and a number of cherry, plum and peach trees. There is also a handsome grove of young walnut and catalpa trees. The property consist of a comfortable frame dwelling house, small stock stable, granary and other out buildings.

G. W. STUMBO, farmer, Section 10, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Mahaska County, Iowa, October 11, 1848, and resided in his native State until his third year, when his parents started to remove to Oregon Territory. They both died, however, while crossing the plains. The subject of this sketch was then taken in charge by his uncle, Hiram Niday, who took him through to Oregon. Mr. S. lived in this Territory until 1863, when he went to Idaho, where he lived five years and was engaged in mining and prospecting. From Idaho he went to California, where he was engaged in freighting and where he lived five years. From there he went to Nevada where he again engaged in mining until 1879, when he removed to Falls City, Neb., where he lived until September, 1872 (sic), when he removed to Irving township, Brown County, where he resides at present. He was married December 27, 1879, in Falls City, Neb., to Miss Hirsa Hall, a native of Iowa. They have one child, a son, whose name is David.

ISAAC L. VAIL, farmer and stock raiser, Section 18, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Hiawatha, was born in Middlesex County, N. J., April 1, 1840, and lived in his native county until his tenth year, when his parents removed to Newark, in the same State, where they lived until the spring of 1857, when they removed to Henry County, Ill., where Mr. V. lived until September 19, 1861, when he became a member of Company H, Thirty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Cambridge, Ill. On the lst day of January, 1864, Mr. V. re-enlisted in the same company and regiment and served until the close of the war, being discharged December 2, 1865, at Vicksburg, Miss. He was present and took part in the battle of Frederickstown, Mo., October, 21, 1861; Cotton Plant, Ark., July, 1862; Magnolia Hill, Champion Hill, Black River, siege of Vicksburg, Matagorda Bay, Spanish Fort, Mobile Bay, and a number of minor engagements. After his discharge from the U. S. Army he went to Chicago, where he attended Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College, and after completing his course came, in the spring of 1866, to Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He has been Clerk of School District No. 25, Brown County, for four years. He was married in November, 1868, in Brown County, to Miss Emma Chipman, a native of Warren County, Pa. They have three children living - Cora, Maud and Theodore. Mr. V. has a choice upland farm of 160 acres, all enclosed with substantial fences, and all under cultivation. The water supply is fair. There is a thrifty orchard on the place which contains 250 fruit trees. There is a fine grove of native trees near the dwelling. The improvements are a new and commodious frame house, stock stable, granary, smoke house, corn cribs, etc. Mr. V. had five acres in oats which yielded 180 bushels, ten acres in barley which yielded 350 bushels, and seventy acres in corn which averaged fifty-five bushels to the acre. Mr. Vail is one of the intelligent and leading farmers of his section, raises considerable fine stock, and is prospering abundantly.

EVAN B. WILLIAMS, farmer and proprietor of coal mine, Section 16, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, Brown County, was born in Monmouthshire, England, June 24, 1833, but lived in his native country only till his third year, when his parents immigrated to America, locating in Montour County, Pa., where Mr. Williams lived until his eighteen year. When he went to California, where he lived one year and was engaged in mining. From the Golden State he went to Australia, via the Sandwich and Simoon Island, where he was engaged in gold mining and remained two and a half years. From Australia he went to Peru, South America, remained a short time, and returned to California via the Isthmus of Panama and Acapulco, Mexico. He resided in California, where he was engaged in coal mining, about eleven years, and then returned via the Isthmus to Pennsylvania, where he lived two and a half years, and then went to the Rocky Mountains where he was engaged in coal mining. Staid (sic) a short time, went to Iowa, and after a short time removed to Bevier, Mo., and from there, in December, 1868, came to Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Robinson Lodge, No. 159, A., F & A. M. He was married in Danville, Pa., in 1867, to Miss Elizabeth Dencenbarger, a native of Bavaria, Germany. They have four children living - Mary, Charles F., Katie D. and George. Mr. Williams owns a valuable upland farm of 120 acres, all enclosed with substantial fences, and all in cultivation. The supply of water is excellent, and consist of a number of fine springs and Roy's Creek, which flows along the north and east sides of his farm. The improvements consist of a new frame dwelling, containing seven rooms, and good outbuildings. On the northwest quarter of the farm is one of the best coal mines in Brown County, which is operated by Mr. Williams, personally. The coal is of good quality, meets with ready sale, and the yearly out-put amounts to from 14,000 to 15,000 bushels. Mr. Williams has been a great traveler in his time, and has made the acquaintance of thousands of persons in various countries and climes. He is a substantial business man and farmer, and has an enviable reputation as a citizen.

GEORGE MARION WILSON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 9, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Oregon, Holt County, Mo., December 31, 1852, and lived in his native State until his fifth year, when his parents moved to Iowa Point, Doniphan County, where Mr. W lived ten years. He then went to Richardson County, Neb., where he was engaged in farming and where he resided for eight years. From Nebraska he returned to Kansas, locating in Brown County; where he has resided since. He was married in Irving Township, Brown County, in April, 1875, to Miss Sulie A. Wilhoit, a native of Andrew County, Mo. They have had three children, two of whom are living, Louie B. And Maud Estella. Mr. Wilson owns a fine farm of 160 acres, equally divided between bottom and upland. It is enclosed by substantial fences. Seventy acres are under cultivation, the remainder being timber and pasture land. The farm is well supplied with water, Roy's Creek flowing through the center, and has also a number of good springs and a fine well. The orchard is young and thrifty. The improvements are a comfortable four roomed frame dwelling, stock stables, corn crib, etc. In addition to farming his own land Mr. Wilson cultivates fifty-five acres of rented land. He had thirty acres in fall wheat this season which yielded 607 bushels, and forty acres in corn which turned out a crop of 2,000 bushels. He keeps twelve to fifteen head of stock cattle, forty to fifty head of hogs and eight head of horses and mules. He is a young and enterprising farmer and is well and favorably known for his strict integrity and fine business qualities.

[TOC] [part 20] [part 18] [Cutler's History]