KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 18

[TOC] [part 19] [part 17] [Cutler's History]

IRVING TOWNSHIP.

This township was one of the earliest of the county to receive settlement, and is now thickly peopled with a prosperous community, though having no towns, or even villages, within its borders. The first settlers were Solomon McCall and L. Ashley, who located March 13, 1855. The only postoffice in the township at present writing (January, 1883), is that of Mount Roy. This office was established September 2, 1857, with Shelton Duff as the first Postmaster. There are several schoolhouses in the township. That in District No. 8 is generally believed to have been the first built in the county. The township has always taken much interest in schools, and one at least of its schools is deserving of mention.

Heckler Schoolhouse, District No. 35, Brown County, was erected in 1869, at a cost of $1,200. It is well furnished, has a seating capacity of fifty, and is a handsome frame structure. The first school officers were elected March 16, 1868, and consisted of Henry J. Heckler, Director; J. W. Bowman, clerk, and Abel Hodge, Treasurer. The officers at present consist of the following named gentlemen: George Klinefelter, Director; Thos. A. Dunn, Clerk, and H. Clay Plotner, Treasurer. The building is also used as a church and Sunday school. An Methodist Episcopal Congregation, Rev. E. K. Jones, pastor, hold services here on alternate Sabbaths, and a Union Sunday school occupy the building weekly. The latter organization owns a fine toned Mason & Hamlin organ.

The average daily attendance of the day school is thirty-eight, and according to the last report of the Superintendent of Public Schools of Brown County, L. H. Smyth, Esq., it is in point of morals and good government, one of the best in the county, reflecting great credit on the school officers and the efficient teacher, Mr. Daniel R. Mercer.

Hill Top Schoolhouse, District No. 8, Brown County, is built on what was once a portion of Mr. Idol's farm. It is a frame structure and was erected in 1870 at a cost of $2,000. It has a seating capacity of seventy-five and is well furnished with all the modern school furniture. The first school officers were - Dr. H. F. Macey, director; M. B. Bowers, treasurer, and S. B. Sloan, clerk. The present officers are - J. M. Idol, director; Oliver Dimmock, treasurer, and B. G. Goodwin. clerk. Mr. Wilbur A. Jaques is the teacher at present in charge of the school. The daily attendance is forty. Besides the ordinary studies pursued in district schools the following branches are taught at Hill Top: Civil government, book keeping, physiology and algebra. This school has had the honor of furnishing several first class instructors to Brown County, and who are now engaged in teaching in her public schools.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (BEACH - GUINN).

ALBERT E. BEACH, farmer, Section 9, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Ontario County, N. Y., August 3, 1842, but left his native State at an early age with his parents, who removed to Scott Township, Ogle Co., Ill., where Mr. B. resided twenty-nine years and was engaged in farming. In the fall of 1872 he removed from Illinois to Kansas, locating in Lyon County, near Emporia, where he resided but one year, and in 1873 removed to Butler Country, near Eldorado, where he was engaged in farming and freighting and where he resided until 1881, when he removed to Irving Township Brown County, and where he has resided since. He was married, August 6, 1864, in Rockford, Ill., to Miss Sarah A. Barnes, a native of Pittsburgh, Penn. They have six children living, whose names are: Lilly M. (married to Matthew Noble, a native of Edgar County, Ill., and a resident of Brown County); Walter Eugene, Willie H., Harry Lee, Carrie Alice (twins) and Cora Maud. Mr. Beach owns a choice upland farm of forty acres. It is all enclosed and all in cultivation. The water supply is good and consists of a number of fine springs and a good well. The improvements are a comfortable and cosy frame dwelling, containing six rooms, stock stable, good granary, etc., etc. Mr. B. is a thorough practical farmer, and believes that a small farm, well tilled, is better than a large one, half cultivated. His oats, this season, averaged seventy-five bushels to the acre, and his corn fifty-five bushels. Mr. Beach stands high in the community in which he lives and is know for his sterling good sense and integrity.

ALEXANDER W. BELL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 19, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. Hiawatha, was born in Morgan County, Ohio, October 20, 1836, and lived in his native State until his twenty-second year, when he removed to Buchanan County, Mo., where he resided until August, 1861, when he returned to his native county in Ohio, where he entered the Union army as a member of Company C, One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served until the close of the war and was discharged at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, June 30, 1865. He took part in the battles of Winchester, Mine Run, Wilderness campaign, Monocacy Junction, Md, Sheridan's Campaign in the Valley, siege of, and battle, of around Petersburg, and in all the engagements previous and up to the surrender of Lee's army. Mr. B. was wounded three times in the service, one severely at Mine Run in 1863. After his discharge from the army he returned to his Ohio home, staid (sic) a short time and then went to St. Joseph, Mo., where he resided until March, 1879, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. He is Treasurer of Irving Township. He was married November 29, 1866, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Catherine Hersh, a native of Missouri. They have four children living - Oscar Edward, Lizzie J., Martin A. and James H. Mr. Bell owns a splendid upland farm of 144 acres, enclosed by a very nearly two miles of handsome hedge and well supplied with cross fences; 100 acres are under cultivation, the remainder being meadow and pasture land. The supply of water is abundant and consists of a number of fine springs and two good wells. The orchard contains 165 bearing apple, 100 peach and a number of pear and cherry trees. The improvements are first-class and comprise a comfortable and cozy home, with six rooms, surrounded by handsome shrubbery and shade trees, a frame barn, 28x20 feet, wagon shed, granary, corn crib, smoke-house, etc., etc. Near the dwelling is a magnificent grove of native timber, which contains about 600 maple and cottonwood trees. Mr. Bell raises yearly from 300 to 350 bushels of wheat, 200 bushels of oats and 3,500 bushels of corn; keeps ten to fifteen head of stock cattle, fifty head of stock hogs and a half a dozen head of horses. He is a man of large and liberal views, a thorough farmer and a popular citizen.

C. F. BOWRON, M. D., farmer, Section 35, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Clinton County, N. Y., near the site of the battle ground of Plattsburg, January 21, 1814, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year. He then removed to what is now Morrow County, Ohio, where he commenced reading medicine with Drs. Roberts and Carey, eminent and well-known practitioners of Mount Gilead in this county. After reading medicine with these gentlemen for a period of about three years, he attended lectures at the Starling Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio, graduating at this institution in 1848. He then commenced the practice of his profession in Morrow County, Ohio, where he resided about six months, and then removed to Champaign County in the same State, where he resided nearly twelve years, and practiced his profession. In the fall of 1851, he removed to Oregon, Holt Co., Mo., where he resided until May, 1857, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating near Troy, Doniphan County, where he resided eighteen months, and then returned to Oregon, Mo., where he resided this time until the spring of 1862, when he returned to Kansas, and located in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Kansas Legislature, session of 1872-73. He was married in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1840 to Miss Jane Foster, a native of Ohio. They have seven children living, whose names are - Jacob W. (married to Miss Ella Roberts, a native of Illinois), Samuel (married to Miss Mattie Hershey, a native of Illinois), James, Phoebe, Darl, Fletcher and Mary. After a practice of ten years in Brown County, in addition to the number of years he practiced in other States, Dr. B. retired from the practice of his profession, owing to ill-health, and devoted his entire attention to the management of his fine 400-acre farm, on the Hiawatha and White Cloud road, being situated seven miles from the latter place. The farm is enclosed by substantial fences, is well watered by a number of the finest springs in the county, has good improvements, splendid orchards, and is in a good state of cultivation. Mr. B. raises from 500 to 600 bushels of wheat, 500 to 750 bushels of oats, 6,000 to 8,000 bushels of corn, keeps 25 to 50 head of stock cattle, 50 to 75 stock hogs, and 15 to 20 horses, among which are some find road horses. Dr. Bowron is one of the leading farmers, and a man of considerable personal influence in his section.

FREDERICK BURKHALTER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 10, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas in the winter of 1856, locating at Iowa Point, Doniphan County, where he lived seventeen years, and was engaged in the butchering business. From Iowa Point he removed to his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he had resided since. He was a member of the Board of School District, No. 62, Brown County, for three terms. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as First Lieutenant of Ninth Regiment of Militia, and enlisted in Troy in the fall of 1861, served two months and was discharged at Troy on the 26th day of June, 1862. Mr. B. enlisted in Company F, Second Regiment, United States Regular Infantry; this regiment was sent to California, going "round the Horn," and arrived in California, July 8, 1849. He served with his regiment, participating in several Indian fights, until June 26, 1853, when he was mustered out. After his discharge from the army, he was employed in the Quartermaster's Department, United States Army, at Benicia, Cal., for one year; he then returned to Muskingum County, Ohio, where he remained until he came to Kansas. Mr. Burkhalter was born near Falzburg, Germany, August 3, 1829, and lived in his native State until his nineteenth year, when he immigrated to America, and located at Creston, Ohio, where he lived nearly a year. From Creston he removed to Cincinnati, where he remained but a short time, and then went to Pittsburgh, Penn.; from there he returned to Cincinnati, remaining a short time, and then went to Newport Barracks, Ky., where he enlisted in the United States Army. He was married in Iowa Point, Doniphan County, in May, 1863, to Miss Matilda Wilson, a native of Missouri. They have seven children living - F. Louis, Sophie, Frederic, Jr., George, Katie, Nellie and Carrie. Mr. Burkhalter has a fine upland farm of 240 acres, all enclosed, and all under cultivation except seventy acres, which is pasture land. The water supply is good, and consists of wells and springs. The orchard covers one acre, and contains thirty peach and seventy-five apple trees. The improvements consist of a comfortable six-room frame dwelling house, new large frame barn, granary, corn crib, etc. Mr. Burkhalter had thirty-six acres in wheat this season, which yielded 980 bushels; eight acres in rye, which yielded 200 bushels; four acres in oats, which yielded 150 bushels; 105 acres in corn, which average fifty bushels to the acre. Mr. B. is a thrifty practical farmer, and a square, manly man, who entertains a very high opinion of the section of the county he has settled in.

HERMIS CHAMPLIN, farmer, Section 21, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in McLean County, Ill., May 22, 1849, and lived in his native State until his eighteenth year, when he removed to Nebraska where he lived two years and was principally engaged in working at his trade as a carpenter. From Nebraska he came to Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in Forest City, Mo., January 1, 1871, to Miss Marcella Hockabaugh, a native of Illinois. They have five children living, Flora, Freddie, Dora, William and Eulalie. Mr. Champlin is a young and industrious farmer, and is well known among his neighbors for his sterling uprightness and integrity of character.

GEORGE DANSBERGER, farmer and stock raiser, Section 16, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 9, 1816, and lived in his native country until 1852, when he immigrated to America and located in Montour County, Pa., where he resided eighteen years. In the fall of 1870 he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. He was married in 1850 in Bavaria, Germany, to Miss Annie Hartline, a native of the same province. They have five children living - Elizabeth, married to Evan B. Williams, a native of England and a resident of Brown County; Margaret, widow of John Baker, a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, she has five children living; Catherine, married to David D. Work, a native of Pennsylvania, and a resident of Brown County; George and Andrew. Mr. D. has a fine upland farm of eighty acres, all under cultivation and surrounded by substantial fences. The farm is well supplied with water by a number of good springs and fine wells. There is a young peach orchard on the place which contains 200 trees. The improvements are good and consist of a new and handsome dwelling containing six rooms, a convenient frame barn, granary, corn crib, etc., etc. Mr. D. raises from 100 to 150 bushels of wheat, 250 to 300 bushels of oats, and 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of corn yearly, keeps a dozen head of stock cattle, twenty to thirty head of stock hogs, and seven head of horses and mules. He is a model farmer and a highly respected citizen.

GEORGE B. DEAN, farmer, Section 35, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Ripley County, Ind., April 14, 1859, and lived in his native State until March, 1882, when he removed to Johnson County, Mo., where he resided seven months and was engaged in farming. In October, 1882, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Allen Lodge, No. 165, A. F. & A. M., of Moore's Hill, Dearborn County, Ind. He is a young, intelligent, and energetic farmer and a good citizen and neighbor.

THOMAS A. DUNN, farmer and stock raiser, southwest of Section 35, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, November 15, 1838, and lived in his native State but a short time when his father, Richard Dunn, removed to the Platte Purchase in Missouri. His father was one of the first settlers in this region and tells many graphic tales of the early history of this part of Missouri. Mr. Thomas Dunn lived in Missouri until the breaking out of the war, when he entered the Confederate service as a private in Company F, First Missouri Cavalry. He enlisted December 25, 1861, at Springfield, Mo., and was transferred in April, 1862, to Company G, Monroe's Arkansas Cavalry. He participated in the battles of Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Cane Hill, Fayetteville, Cove Creek, Jenkin's Ferry, Prairie D'Ann and Pilot Knob, or Ironton, Mo. At the last named battle Mr. D., who since his transfer to Monroe's Cavalry had been regularly promoted to First Lieutenant of his company, was wounded and taken prisoner by the Union forces under Brig. Gen. Ewing. After his capture he was kept at Ironton until he was able to be moved and then taken to Alton, Ill., where he remained until the spring of 1865, when he was paroled. After his release he went to his father's house in Nebraska City, Neb., where he staid (sic) a short time and then engaged in freighting on the plains. He was thus employed until December, 1865, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a consistent and prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has been Justice of the Peace of Irving Township six years, Township Clerk three years, and a member of the School Board of his district ten years. He was married in Irving Township in February, 1869, to Miss Mary C. Wood, a native of Missouri. They have two children, Sybil and Arthur Wood. Mr. Dunn has a fine upland farm of 160 acres. It is enclosed by nearly three miles of hedge and has 110 acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture and meadow land. The farm is well watered by wells and living water. There is a splendid orchard on the place which covers six acres and contains 500 fruit trees, among which are apple, Siberian crab, dwarf apple, peach, plum, cherry and pear trees. There is an abundance of small fruits on the property, among which are grapes, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries and gooseberries. Near the dwelling is a magnificent grove of native timber containing 2,000 cottonwood, black and white walnut, and maple trees. The improvements consists in part of a new and splendid family mansion containing six rooms and handsomely furnished throughout, large frame barn, granary, corn cribs, smoke house, wagon sheds, cattle yards, etc. Mr. Dunn raises form 400 to 500 bushels of wheat, 300 to 400 bushels of rye, 200 to 300 bushels of oats, 2,500 to 3,000 bushels of corn, feeds a car load of cattle, keeps forty to fifty head of stock cattle, seventy-five to 100 head of stock hogs and ten horses and mules. Mr. D. is a thorough and practical farmer, a straightforward and honorable citizen, stands well with the people and is a deserving man in every respect.

HENRY ELLIS, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 5, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Morris County, N. J., July 20, 1844, and lived in his native State until his twelfth year, when his parents removed to Worthington, Franklin Co., Ohio, where Mr. E. resided until his seventeenth year, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating at White Cloud, where he lived until 1872, and then removed to his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. During the War of the Rebellion he was a member of Company A, Seventh Regiment Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and enlisted at Highland, in August, 1861, and was discharged at La Grange, Tenn., in January, 1863. He re-enlisted on the day of his discharge in the same company and regiment and was finally discharged in October, 1865, at Leavenworth. He participated in the battles of the Little Blue, Corinth, Iuka, Oxford, Miss., Holly Springs, Waterville, Tallahatchie, Coffeyville, Bolivar, Ripley, Guntown, Florence, Ala., Fayettville, Miss., Jefferson, Mo., Bear Creek and Town Creek, Ala., Mine Creek, Booneville and Lexington, Mo. Mr. Ellis has a fine upland farm of eighty acres. It is enclosed with substantial fences, and has seventy-six acres in cultivation, the remainder being meadow land. The supply of water is excellent, and consists of a number of fine springs. The improvements are first-class in every particular, and consist of an elegant home and good outbuildings. Mr. E. raises from 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of corn yearly, keeps 25 head of stock cattle, 15 to 25 head of stock hogs and half a dozen head of horses. He is a veteran of the last war, and relates many graphic tales of his life while in the service. He is a man of liberal intelligence and manly character and standing.

A. P. FINLEY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 2, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Stark County, Ill., February 16, 1840, and lived in his native State until February, 1882, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as a private in Company A, Third Illinois Cavalry, and enlisted at Springfield, Ill., August 17, 1861, and was discharged in the same city August 5, 1864. He participated in the battles of Pea Ridge, Vicksburg, and a number of minor engagements. He was married in 1866, in Stark County, Ill., to Miss Rachel Heiner, a native of Warren County, N. J. They have had seven children, six of whom are living, and whose names are: Myrtle, died in September, 1879; Katie, Albert, Mary, Edwin, Charles, and Lida. Mr. Finley is a hard working and industrious farmer, and is well known for his strict integrity.

MORRIS FRALEY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 29, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. Jonesville, was born in Montgomery County, N. Y., January 16, 1836, and lived in his native State until his sixteenth year, when he went to Holt County, Mo., where he worked at his trade as a carpenter, and in the fall of 1856, became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he resided until the spring of 1857, when he removed to White Cloud, where he lived until 1860, then returned to Brown County, where he farmed two years and then returned to White Cloud, where he resided this time five years and was engaged at working at his trade and in freighting across the plains. From White Cloud he again returned to Brown County, locating in Irving Township, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the Masonic fraternity, and was one of the charter members of White Cloud Lodge, No. 78. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company C, Ninth Regiment, Kansas Militia, and enlisted in Brown County, in the summer of 1863, and served until the close of the war and was discharged at White Cloud. He was married January 12, 1860, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Miss Jennie Mawhenny, a native of Virginia. Mr. F. owns two fine Brown County farms, one containing 160 acres, and the other, the home farm, eighty acres. These farms are both enclosed, are all under cultivation and rank among the best in this section. The water supply is pure and abundant and consists of a number of fine springs and branches. There is an orchard on the home farm which covers eight acres and contains 700 fruit trees. There is also a young and thrifty orchard on farm No. 2, which covers five acres and has about 500 fruit trees. The improvements on the home farm are firstclass, and consist of a new, neat and cozy dwelling, frame barn 24x32 feet, granary, corn crib, smokehouse, etc. Mr. F. raises from 1,4000 to 1,800 bushels of wheat yearly, 500 to 700 bushels of oats, 6,000 to 8,000 bushels of corn, 200 bushels of apples, feeds 25 to 30 head of cattle, keeps 50 to 60 head of stock cattle, 75 to 100 head of stock hogs and 8 head of horses and mules. On the southern portion of the home farm is a fine quarry of sandstone, which is being worked at the present time. The stone meets with a ready sale among the neighboring farmers. There is a fine apiary on the farm which is under the immediate supervision of Mrs. Fraley, and which has twenty-one strands. Mr. Fraley is an intelligent, earnest, and progressive farmer of liberal views and stands high in his community.

ELIAS FRITZINGER, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Highland, came to Kansas in the fall of 1866, locating in Brown County, near Highland, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. F. was born in Lehigh County, Pa., October 14, 1840, and lived in his native county until his thirteenth year, when he removed to Montgomery County in the same State, where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Highland, Doniphan Co., September 5, 1868, to Miss Mary Cole, a native of the Buckeye State, a daughter of Abraham Cole, Esq. Mr. F. has a fine upland farm of 160 acres all under fence, and in a high state of cultivation. The improvements consist of a French cottage, dwelling, two stories high, and which contains nine rooms, and has two large verandas on the north and south sides of the building. The house was erected in 1880, and is finely finished throughout. Mr. F. has also a comfortable tenant house on his farm which is generally occupied by his laborers. He has a fine new, large barn, built on the latest and most improved plans; granary, corn-cribs and other farm buildings. His orchard covers 8 acres, and has 200 apple, 2,000 peach, 25 cherry and 15 pear trees. His vineyard covers half an acre, and has 150 vines. He also has an abundance of small fruits such as raspberry, currants, etc., etc. His farm is well supplied with good pure water, having two wells and a cistern. He also has six fine springs which supply an equal number of fields with plenty of running water for his stock. His farm is finely situated, and is one of the best stock farms in Brown County. It lies on the State road, between Hiawatha and Highland, being nine miles from the former, and five miles from the latter place. Mr. Fitzinger devotes his time to raising grain, fine hogs, horses and cattle. He is one of the numerous sons of the old Keystone State who have immigrated to Kansas, and who by their proverbial thrift and industry, have become substantial and prosperous farmers in the State.

ANDREW R. GEYER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 17, Town 5, Range 9, P. O. Robinson, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, September 18, 1827, and lived in his native State until the spring of 1880, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married in Morrow County, Ohio, in 1853, to Miss Charlotte Valentine, a native of Ohio. They have seven children living - Julletta M. (married to Willis M. Nellans, a native of Ohio), Sarah E. (married to W. L. Valentine, a native of Ohio), Elza Lorain, Henry H., Mary Almmeda, Nathaniel F. and Charles Elmer. Mr. Geyer has one of the finest upland farms in his section. It contains 160 acres, and is enclosed by substantial fences; has seventy-five acres in cultivation; forty acres in pasture, and the remainder meadow. It is well supplied with running water the year round, and is well calculated for a stock farm. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the place, which contains 100 apple, fifty peach, and a few pear and cherry trees. The improvements are a new and neat frame dwelling, containing four rooms; stock stable, corn-crib, smoke house, etc. Mr. G. had twelve acres in fall wheat this season, which yielded 300 bushels, and forty-five acres in corn, which averaged fifty bushels to the acre. Mr. Geyer is an intelligent farmer, and a Christian gentleman, and is held in high esteem by his neighbors. During the War of the Rebellion Mr. G. was a member of Company I, Eighty-eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted in Columbus, Ohio, in the fall of 1863, and was discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio, in June, 1865.

AARON B. GIBSON, farmer, Section 15, township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas in April 1867, and located on his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. Mr. Gibson took part in the War of the Rebellion, as a member of Company A, Fifth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He entered this regiments as a private, May 10, 1861, at Manitowoc, Wis., and was promoted through all the various grades, being mustered out as First Lieutenant, commanding his company, at Madison, Wis., August 1, 1864. He took part in the battles of Gettysburg, Antietam, the Peninsula Campaign, Wilderness, and in fact in almost all of the battles of the old Army of the Potomac up to the closing battles of, and around Petersburg. He was severely wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania C. H., from the effects of which he is suffering to-day (sic). Mr. Gibson was born in Fitchburg, Mass., May 11, 1834, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, and then removed to Manitowoc, Wis., where he resided until he entered the Union army. After his discharge from the service, he returned to his Wisconsin home, where he resided three years, and then removed to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he resided four years, and then returned to Wisconsin, where he lived three and a half years, and then came to Kansas. He was married September 29, 1867, in Galesburg, Wis., to Miss Emma B. McAllister, a native of Libertyville, Lake Co., Ill. They have two children - Carrie and Callsta. Mr. Gibson owns one of the choice upland farms in Brown County. For location, good buildings, fences and good cultivation, it cannot be surpassed. It contains eighty acres, all enclosed by substantial fences, and all in cultivation. The water for family use and for the stock is supplied by two excellent never-failing wells. His orchard covers one acre, and contains 100 apple, 300 peach, twenty-five cherry, and a few pear and plum trees. There is also an abundance of all kinds of small fruits. The improvements consist of a neat and tasteful frame dwelling house, containing eight rooms and with cellar, surrounded by handsome evergreens and shade trees, a new large frame barn, new granary, corn crib, etc. He had fifteen acres in fall wheat, which yielded 379 bushels; two acres in rye, which yielded sixty bushels; five acres in oats, which yielded 130 bushels; seven acres in spring wheat, which yielded fifty bushels, and forty acres in corn, which average fifty-five bushels to the acre. Mr. Gibson is an intelligent, earnest, progressive farmer, of liberal views and decided public spirit.

E. B. GORDON, farmer, Section 10, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas in April, 1865, and located in White Cloud, where he resided six years, and was engaged in farming. From White Cloud he went to Richardson County, Neb., where he resided five years, and was engaged in the milling business. From Nebraska he came to Irving Township, where he has resided since. He took part in the last war as a member of Company A, Sixteenth Regiment Kansas Militia, and was enlisted at Atchison, in the fall of 1864; served one month, and was discharged in the same city. Mr. Gordon was born in Warren County, Ohio, July 3, 1846, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, when his parents removed to McLean County, Ill., where he always resided until he came to Kansas. He was married October 20, 1872, in Falls City, Neb., to Miss Mollie Hall, a native of Illinois. They have two children living whose names are Effie Blanche and Nellie. Mr. Gordon is a young, intelligent and industrious farmer, and is bound to become ere long a prosperous one also.

PHILIP GRIBLING, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 23, Township 1, Range 18, P. O. White Cloud, Doniphan County, was born in Neiweit on the Rhine, Germany, July 4, 1849, but lived in his native country but a short time when his parents immigrated to America, locating in Mansfield, Ohio, where Mr. G. lived until the fall of 1867, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of White Cloud Lodge No. 6, I. O. of O. F. and of White Cloud Lodge No. 98, A., F. & A. M. In the fall of 1868, Mr. G. enlisted in Company H, Nineteenth Kansas Cavalry at White Cloud, and his company was shortly afterward sent to join the force unthe command of Gen. Custer at Fort Dodge. Mr G. took part in the engagement with Black Kettle's band and in a number of Indian skirmishes. He was discharged from the United States service at Fort Hays in the fall of 1869. He was married at Falls City, Neb., July 4, 1871, to Miss Rebecca J. Bright, a native of Pike County, Ill. They have two children living, whose names are: Carrie Ada and Nellie May. Mr. Gribling is an intelligent and industrious young farmer and a good citizen. He raises from 200 to 400 bushels of wheat, the same amount of oats, 3,000 to 8,000 bushels of corn yearly, feeds half a car load of cattle, keeps 25 to 30 head of stock cattle, 40 to 50 stock hogs and 4 head of horses and mules.

JASPER N. GUINN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 16, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Ray County, Mo., May 2, 1830, and lived in his native county but a short time when his parents removed to Clay County in the same State, where they lived four years. From there they removed to Buchanan County, Mo., where Mr. G. lived until 1847, when he entered the Government employ and was engaged in freighting on the plains. He was thus engaged until the spring of 1848, when he entered the United States Army as a private. He enlisted at Middle Cimmaron Springs, N. M., in a company commanded by Lieut. Roy, proceeded as far as Santa Fe, where learning that peace had been declared the company was disbanded. After his discharge from the service Mr. G. returned to Fort Leavenworth where he remained a short time and then went to his home in Missouri, where he lived until 1852, when he removed to Gentry County in the same State, where he resided until the fall of 1860, when he removed to Buchanan County, Mo., where he lived until September, 1861, when he again entered the United States Army as a private in Company H, First Battalion Missouri Militia. He served in this company until the spring of 1862, when he was transferred to Company F, First Regiment Missouri Militia, and was a member of this company until the close of the war. He took part in the battles of Camden Point, Rock House Prairie and other minor engagements and skirmishes. He was severely wounded while in the service from the effects of which he suffers to-day (sic). After his discharge he returned to his home in Buchanan County, Mo., where he resided until the 11th day of March, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he resided two years. He then removed to his farm in Irving Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Church of the United Brethren. Mr. Guinn has been married twice. The first marriage occurred in Gentry County, Mo., in November 1852, to Miss Deborah Culp, a native of Missouri. She died in April, 1862. Four children were the result of this marriage, only one of whom is living and whose name is Isabella Jane (married to George Williams, a native of Kansas and a resident of Washington Township, Brown County). The second marriage took place September 2, 1864, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Hester Arnold, a native of North Carolina. They have four children - Mary E., John Stanton, Phileena A. And William T. Mr. Guinn owns a choice upland farm of eighty acres, all enclosed and all in cultivation. The place is well watered by a number of fine springs and wells and by Roy's Creek which flows across the northeast corner of the farm. There is a good peach orchard on the place which contains 400 trees. The improvements are good and consist of a comfortable framed dwelling, stock stable, granary, corn crib, etc. Mr. G. raises from 200 to 300 bushels of wheat yearly, and 2,000 to 3,000 bushels of corn, keeps 25 to 30 head of stock cattle, 40 to 50 stock hogs and a few horses. He is a veteran of two wars, a thorough and practical farmer and well known for his integrity.

[TOC] [part 19] [part 17] [Cutler's History]