KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 17

[TOC] [part 18] [part 16] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (SLATER - WYNKOOP).

BENJAMIN P. SLATER, watchmaker and jeweler, came to Kansas in November, 1869, and first located in Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, where he resided ten years and was engaged in business. From Oskaloosa he went to Chanute, Neosho County, where he lived three years, and from there came to Robinson, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Slater was born in Hopkinton, R. I., January 25, 1805, and lived in his native state one year when his parents removed to Eaton, Madison Co., N. Y., where Mr. Slater resided until his twenty-sixth year. He then removed to Scottsville, N. Y., where he resided one year. From there he moved to Olean Point, where he lived four years, and from there went to Coudersport, Pa., where he lived two years and returned to Steuben County, N. Y., where he lived four years. From New York he went to Lancaster County, Pa., where he lived nine years, and from there returned to Steuben County, N. Y., where he resided this time five years. From there he removed to Erie, Pa., where he resided nine years, and from there came to Kansas. Mr. Slater has been married three times. The first marriage took place in Madison County, N. Y., in 1829, to Miss Philantha Moore, a native of New York. By this marriage he had one child, a daughter, Amelia O., married to Mr. Babbitt, a native of New York. The second marriage took place in Olean Point, N. Y., in 1837, to Miss Martha Gelatt, a native of New York. By this marriage he had five children, three of whom are living, Charles P., Marian, married to Mr. Whitney, a native of New York, and Sarah. The third marriage took place in Erie, Pa., in 1863, to Mrs. Deborah Malvina Blackman, a native of New York. Three children were the fruits of this marriage—Myrtle, Ella Nette, and Perry Ulysses. Mr. Slater is a skillful mechanic, and as he is the only one of his trade in the town of Robinson, he is always kept busily employed.

A. F. SMITH, farmer, stock and fruit raiser, southwest of Section 34, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in County Kildare, Ireland, January 12, 1833, and lived in his native country till his fourth year, when he was brought to America by his uncle and aunt, who located in Providence, R. I. Mr. Smith resided in that city until 1854 and then went to New Orleans where he resided two years, and from there went to Chillicothe, Ohio, where he resided three years, and from there after a short stay in Logan County, Ohio, went to Shelbyville, Ill., where he resided three years, and from there came to Kansas, first locating on the 5th day of February, 1860, in the city of Leavenworth. He remained in this city a short time and then went to the mountains, where he staid six months and was engaged in mining and prospecting. He then returned to Lexington, Mo., where he resided until 1861 and then returned to Leavenworth where he was in the employ of the government until the fall of 1862. He then removed to Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Church of the United Brethren. He was married in Saline County, Mo., in 1860, to Miss M. J. Coates, a native of Missouri. They have four children living whose names are: Jeanette Eugenia, Louisa Catherine, James Edward, William Henry. Mr. Smith has a choice farm of 162 acres, mostly first and second bottom land. It is all enclosed with substantial fences. He has eighty acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture and timber land. The water supply is excellent and consists of fine springs and brooks. The improvements consist of a five-roomed frame dwelling house, stock stable, granary, corn crib, etc. He had sixty acres in corn this season, which averaged fifty bushels to the acre. He cut sixty tons of prairie hay from thirty acres of land. His orchard covers five acres and contains 300 apple, 1,000 peach, and a few cherry trees. Mr. S. feeds on an average half a car load of steers, and a car load of hogs each year. There is a fine bed of coal, and any quantity of the best quality of blue limestone on the farm.

JOHN F. SPICKELMIER, dealer in groceries, boots, shoes and clothing, came to Kansas in May, 1857, located at East Tennessee Creek, Nemaha County, where he resided one year and from there removed to Boonesboro, Boone Co., Iowa, where he resided until 1868, when he returned to Kansas and located at Clintonville, Brown County, where he resided two years. From there he went to Colorado where he was engaged in freighting, mining and prospecting. He remained in Colorado until 1873, when he again returned to Kansas, locating this time near Robinson, Brown County, where he lived seven years and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Robinson, where he engaged in business and where he resides at present. He was born in Boone County, Iowa, August 18, 1855, and lived in his native State until he was two years of age, when his parents removed to Kansas. He was married in September, 1877, in Brown County, to Miss Minerva Gilmore, a native of Missouri. They have two children—Claude E., and Estella Maud. Mr. Spickelmier is a young and enterprising business man and does a large and safe trade and possesses the esteem and confidence of his patrons and neighbors.

G. M. STITES, farmer and fruit grower, Section 2, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 8, 1826, and lived in his native State until the age of six months when his parents removed to Ripley County, Ind., where Mr. Stites lived until April, 1859, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was Treasurer of Robinson Township one term. He took part in the last war as a member of Company C, Major Pope’s Independent Battalion of Kansas Militia; enlisted at Robinson in the fall of 1864, served fifteen days and was discharged at Lawrence. He was married November 9, 1848, in Lawrenceburg, Ind., to Miss Sarah Round, a native of Worcester County, Maryland. She died October 29, 1881. Mr. S. is the father of six children, whose names are: Eudora, married to Henry Bertwell, a resident of Washington Township, Brown County, and a native of Massachusetts; Mary Jane, married to E. B. Gatchell, P. M., of Leona, Doniphan County, a native of Ohio; H. Franklin, married to Miss Florence Van Hook, a native of Indiana; Celestine, married to Elisha Terrill, a native of Iowa; Ezekiel, a native of Kansas, and Martha Calista, also born in this State. Mr. Stites has a choice grain and fruit farm, mostly upland, containing eighty-four acres. It is all enclosed with substantial fences, and is all in cultivation. The orchard is one of the finest in the county, covers twenty-five acres, and contains 1,055 apple, 1,000 peach and a large number of pear, plum and cherry trees. Small fruits, among which are blackberries, strawberries and grapes, abound in the greatest profusion. There is an abundance of living water on the farm of a good quality. The improvements consist of a comfortable and cosy frame dwelling, frame barn 20x40, wagon shed, corn crib, etc. Mr. S. raises 400 bushels of apples, 500 bushels of peaches, fifty to seventy-five bushels of potatoes, 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of corn, and forty to fifty head of Berkshire hogs annually. White Eagle School House, No. 7, an elegant structure, is built on land that was once a portion of Mr. S.’s farm; it was erected in the fall of 1869, at a cost of very nearly $1,600. It is comfortably furnished and has a seating capacity of 100. This building is also used for church purposes by the members of the Congregationalist faith, Rev. Daniel Kloss, pastor. Miss Mary Palmer, a graduate of one of the St. Joseph, Mo., institutions of learning, has charge of the school at present. Mr. Stites is one of the intelligent, progressive and successful farmers of this country, and speaks highly of this beautiful region of the State.

CHARLES A. TEAGUE, farmer and fruit-raiser, Section 28, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Forsythe County, N. C., January 19, 1853, and lived in his native State until 1859, when his parents removed to Wayne County, Ind. They lived there six years, and then moved to De Witt County, Ill., where they lived eighteen months, and from Illinois to Ripley County, Mo.; they remained there a short time, and then returned to North Carolina, where they lived three years. On the 28th day of March, 1870, they came to Kansas, locating near White Cloud, where they resided two years and from there removed to Robinson Township, Brown County, where Mr. Teague has lived since. He is a member of the Baptist Church. He was married in Robinson, Brown County, February 20, 1876, to Miss Annie May Hughes, a native of Brown County, Kansas. They have two children—Cornelius Lawrence, born October 7, 1877, and Orval Elwood, born June 19, 1881. Mr. Teague is the happy owner of a choice upland farm, containing eighty acres, situated on the Highland and Hiawatha road, equidistant (seven miles from both places), and three miles from the thriving town of Robinson. It it all enclosed by a handsome hedge and all under cultivation except eight acres, which is pasture land. The water supply is good and consists of wells and spring branches. The orchard covers four acres and contains 500 apple and 200 peach trees. Mr. T. raises from 300 to 400 bushels of wheat, 150 to 200 bushels of oats and 1,500 to 2,500 bushels of corn yearly; keeps half a dozen head of stock cattle, ten to fifteen head of stock hogs, and a couple of horses. The improvements are good and consist of a neat and comfortable frame dwelling, stock stable, granary, corn crib, etc. Mr. Teague is a young, intelligent and enterprising farmer and a good citizen.

A. TERRILL, butcher and dealer in smoked meats, etc., came to Kansas in April, 1856, and located in Robinson Township, where he resided one year and then returned to Wapello County, Iowa, where he lived about two years and then went to Pike’s Peak, where he was engaged in mining, and remained one summer, and then returned to Iowa, where he resided a short time and then entered the Union Army as a member of Company B, Thirty-sixth Regiment Iowa Infantry. He was enlisted August 3, 1862, at Christiansburg, Iowa, and was discharged at Davenport, Iowa, in April, 1865. He took part in the attack on Fort Pemberton, the Tallahatchie expedition, and other minor engagements. After his discharge from the service he returned to Iowa, where he lived about four years and then went to Shannon County, Mo., where he remained one year and then again returned to Wapello County, Iowa, where he remained until he came to Kansas. He is a firm and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been for thirty-four years. He is also a member of Robinson Lodge, No. 98, I. O. O. F., and is at present treasurer of his lodge. Mr. Terrill was born in Dearborn County, Ind., February 8, 1829, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, when he removed to Iowa. He was married August 12, 1850, in Dearborn County, Ind., to Miss Marilla A. Parsons, a native of Indiana. They have five children living: Lola, married to Samuel Cameron, a resident of Lee County, Iowa, and a native of Ohio; James Henry, married to Sarah Hockett, a native of Kansas; Marcus Thayer, married to Lutetia Hughes, a native of Kansas; Alvira, married to John Payne, a native of Kansas, and William Allen. Mr. Terrill does a thriving business in his line, is an honorable Christian gentleman and is much respected by his fellow townsmen.

ELISHA J. TERRILL, senior member of the firm of Terrill & Cook, dealers in groceries, provisions, queensware, boots, shoes, etc., came to Kansas in June, 1857, and located in Brown County, where he has since resided. He was born in Wapello County, Iowa, September 8, 1853, and lived in his native State until his third year when his parents removed to Kansas, of which State he has ever since been a resident. He was married in 1877 in Brown County, to Miss Celestine Stites, a native of Indiana.  They have one child, a daughter, Alice. The firm of which Mr. Terrill is a member, do a large and thriving business, which is daily increasing.

C. F. TRAPP, farmer, Section 16, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Jackson County, Mo., June 7, 1841, and resided in his native county but a short time when his parents removed to Andrew County in the same State, where he lived until his twenty-second year; and in March, 1863, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was Constable of Robinson Township four terms and trustee of the same township three years. He took part in the last war as a member of Company C., Maj. Pope’s Independent Battalion, Kansas Militia, and enlisted in Robinson in the fall of 1864, served fourteen days and was discharged in Kansas City. He was married in Andrew County, Mo., in May, 1860, to Miss Mary C. Capps, a native of Mississippi. They have eight children living—William N., Mary E., John F., Frances A., Alexander C., Horace Greeley, Martin Edwin and Martha Bell. Mr. Trapp owns a small but choice farm of forty acres. It is all enclosed with substantial fences and has twenty-five acres of tillable land, the balance being pasture and timber land. The farm is well watered and is improved by a comfortable dwelling, stock stable, orchards, etc., etc. Mr. Trapp in addition to his farm cultivates sixty acres of rented land and raises from 300 to 500 bushels of wheat, 500 bushels of oats, and about 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of corn yearly. He has a fine bed of semi-bituminous coal on his farm which he operates, the output of which amounts to from 4,000 to 5,000 bushels each winter. The coal is sold in Robinson and vicinity. In connection with his eldest son, William N., he operates a New Massillon, Ohio, thresher. He threshed for farmers only living in Robinson Township, Brown County, with one or two exceptions, the past season, 14,000 bushels of wheat and rye, and about 10,000 bushels of oats. Mr. Trapp is a thorough-going practical business man as well as farmer, and has the respect and confidence of his patrons and neighbors.

GEORGE W. ULSH, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Marion County, Ohio, February 3, 1834, and lived in his native State until the spring of 1861, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Congregational Church. He was Overseer of Road, District No. 1, Robinson Township, for three terms. He was married in Marion County, Ohio, August 17, 1854, to Miss Mary J. Harper, a native of Ohio; they have six children living whose names are: John C., married to Miss Laura Thuma, a native of Ohio; Thomas C., Silas M., Altie L., Aura E. and Frederic W. Mr. Ulsh has a fine upland farm of 160 acres all enclosed and all in cultivation except seventy acres, which is timber and pasture land. The water supply is excellent and consists of wells and springs, and Ulsh’s branch of Wolf River flowing through the eastern portion of the farm. The orchard covers two acres and is well supplied with apple, peach, pear and plum trees; there is also an abundance of small fruits and grapes on the property. The improvements consist of a comfortable seven-roomed frame dwelling house surrounded by handsome shade trees and evergreens, a large frame barn 16x33, with sheds on the east side; granary, corn crib, and other outbuildings. Mr. Ulsh had fourteen acres in fall wheat this season, which averaged twenty bushels to the acre; twenty acres in oats, which averaged forty bushels, and seventy acres in corn, which averaged forty-five bushels to the acre. He cut eight acres of clover this season which averaged three tons to the acre. Mr. Ulsh is one of the prosperous go-ahead farmers of Brown County, and with the able assistance of his sons farms not only his own land but 400 acres in addition of rented land in his vicinity.

WILLIAM H. VAN HOOK, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 25, Town 2, Range 18, P. O. Highland, Doniphan County, came to Kansas in September, 1871, locating on his farm in Robinson Township, where he has resided since. He has been a member of the Board of School District No. 20. Brown County, for seven years. Mr. Van Hook was born in Harrison County, Ky., April 3, 1828, and lived in his native State until his seventh year, when his parents removed to Montgomery County, Ind., where Mr. Van Hook lived, with the exception of four and a half years spent in Iowa, until he came to Kansas. He was married in Montgomery County, Ind., in 1851, to Miss Martha Ann Moore, a native of Indiana. They have nine children living—Laura A., Fannie (married to Tilford J. Prewett, a native of Kentucky and a resident of Cowley County, Kan.), James Darwin, Loretta A. (married to Solomon Jameson, a native of Indiana and a resident of Nebraska), Florence B. (married to Frank Stites, a native of Indiana and a resident of Nebraska), Fred, Nellie, Kate, and George Edward. Mr. Van Hook has a fine upland farm of 420 acres, all inclosed, of which 300 acres are in cultivation, the remaining 120 acres being pasture land. His farm is supplied with water by a number of excellent springs and wells. The improvements are all first-class, and consist of a handsome cottage, containing nine rooms and cellar, surrounded by handsome evergreens, and a large grove of native trees which cover six acres; large stock stable, cattle sheds, granary, etc. The orchard covers four acres, and has 200 apple and 400 peach trees. Mr. Van Hook had fifty acres in wheat this season, which averaged twenty-four bushels to the acre; thirty acres of rye, which averaged twenty bushels; and sixty acres in corn, which averaged forty bushels to the acre. He also cut on his farm and put up 100 tons of timothy and clover hay this season. Mr. Van Hook’s farm is well adapted for stock-raising, and he is now making preparations to go into the business of raising Polled Scotch cattle on an extensive scale. He now has on his farm fifty young bulls and heifers of this famous breed. At the head of the herd is the superb young thoroughbred Polled Scotch bull, “Jay Gould,” whose sire was “Badger Boy,” No. 296, bred by Peter Davy, of Dodge County, Wis., which, for superior individual traits, is perhaps the finest animal ever brought into the county. There are also some very handsome grade cows and heifers in the herd, which altogether is an honor to the breeder and to Brown County. Mr. Van Hook recognizes the fact that the Polled Scotch are the coming breed of cattle for the West, and will build up a large and choice herd of this breed. He will be assisted in his labors by his eldest son, James Darwin, to whom he has given an interest in this business.

MARCELLUS VAN WINKLE, plasterer and brick-layer, came to Kansas, January, 1881, and located at Robinson, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born in Hancock County, Ill., February 17, 1856, and lived in his native State until 1868, when his parents removed to Johnson County, Neb., where Mr. Van Winkle lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Johnson County, Neb., November 17, 1875, to Miss Sarah Berg, a native of Germany. They have two children—Mittie May Bell and Minnie. Mr. Van Winkle carries on business extensively for himself, and is well known as a practical mechanic and a thorough master of his trade.

JOHN WEIBLING, proprietor of billiard hall, came to Kansas in the spring of 1861, and located in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was born in Andrew County, Mo., August 14, 1857, and lived in his native State until he came to Kansas. Mr. Weibling was married in 1874, at Robinson, to Miss Cella Odle, a native of Illinois; she died in 1877; one daughter was the result of this marriage—Lillie; she died in 1877.

SIMEON WESTFALL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 27, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Carroll County, Ohio, September 10, 1836, and lived in his native State until January, 1857, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Franklin County, where he lived nine months, and then returned to his Ohio home, where he resided until the fall of 1879, when he returned to Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of Robinson Lodge, No. 159, A., F. & A. M. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company A, Fifty-ninth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was enlisted in Augusta Township, Carroll Co., Ohio, in the summer of 1862, and was discharged at Steubenville, Ohio. He was married in Carrollton, Ohio, September 6, 1859, to Miss Lydia A. Williams, a native of Ohio. They have four children—George Williams, Milton Edwin, Ida Florence and Mina Victoria. Mr. W. is the fortunate owner of a choice upland farm of 160 acres. It is all enclosed with substantial fences, and has 130 acres in cultivation, the remainder being pasture land. The water supply is good and consists of wells and spring branches. The orchard is young and thrifty and contains 100 apple and 175 peach and a few cherry trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the place, consisting of grapes, strawberries and raspberries. On the north and south sides of the dwelling is a magnificent grove of native timber, containing about 1,000 cottonwood and sycamore trees. The improvements are first-class, and consist of a comfortable and cozy dwelling, stock stable, corn crib, etc. Mr. W. raises from 500 to 600 bushels of wheat, 300 to 400 bushels of oats, 100 to 150 bushels of rye, and 2,000 to 2,500 bushels of corn; keeps 20 to 25 head of stock cattle, 40 to 50 head of stock hogs, and half a dozen horses. He is one of the practical, progressive and prosperous farmers of Brown County, and is a good citizen and neighbor.

D. P. WILLIAMS, proprietor of Fairview Farm, Section 32, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Allen County, Ky., February 15, 1828, and lived in his native State until his fourth year, when his parents removed to Greene County, Ind., where they resided ten years, and then removed to Montgomery County, Ill., where Mr. W. lived until he was twenty-two years old, and then removed to Macoupin County in the same State, where he lived four years, and was engaged in farming. From there he removed to Christian County in the same State, where he resided ten years and was engaged in farming. In March, 1865, he left Illinois and came to Kansas, locating in Brown County, where he has resided since. He was Commissioner of Brown County one term. He was married February 10, 1850, in Montgomery County, Ill., to Miss Mahala Bussell, a native of Tennessee. They have four children living—Sarah C., John H., Hiram J., and William A. Mr. Williams built the first flouring mill in Brown County. It was the first building erected in Robinson, and did a thriving trade until it was destroyed by fire. Mr. Williams’ farm lies adjacent to, and overlooks the town of Robinson, and contains 320 acres. He is an enterprising farmer, and has good buildings, good fences, good springs and running brooks; grows 5,000 to 7,000 bushels of corn, 2,000 bushels of wheat, and 500 bushels of oats; feeds 125 Poland pigs, and 30 to 60 steers; keeps a small herd of stock cattle, and sells $100 worth of butter every year, and though born in the blue-grass region of Kentucky, pronounces this the best country of his knowledge.

WILLIAM A. WOLFE, farmer and stock-raiser, northwest half of Section 5, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Morgan County, Ill., February 15, 1835, and lived in his native State until his twenty-second year, when he removed to Dunn County, Wis., and was engaged for eight years in running a double rotatory saw-mill. From Wisconsin, he came, in 1873, to Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in Christian County, Ill., in 1859, to Miss Elizabeth Traughber, a native of Illinois. They have had three children, two of whom are living - Josephine died in April, 1879; John and James. Mr. Wolfe is one of the hard working Democratic farmers of Brown County, and is noted for his straightforwardness (sic) in dealing in business matters. His word is as good as his bond.

JOHN C. WOOD, member of the firm of Wood Bros. & Co., dealers in lumber, coal, live stock and grain, came to Kansas October 13, 1881, locating at Robinson, where he has since resided. He is a strict and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is well known for his Christian character, fair dealing and general uprightness of character. Mr. Wood was born in Albany County, N. Y., March 25, 1835, and lived in his native country until he was two years of age, when his parents removed to Cayuga County, N. Y., where he resided until he was twenty-two years of age, when he removed to Pawnee County, Neb., where he lived until the spring of 1864, and was engaged in farming. He then went to the mountains, where he remained two and a half years, and was engaged in mining. He then returned to Nebraska, where he resided until he came to Kansas. He was married in Pawnee County, Neb., in April, 1870, to Miss M. L. Haywood, a native of Ohio. They have four children - Edgar N., Myron W., Kate E. and Edith A. Mr. Wood keeps the books for his firm, which is composed of N. S., J. C. and M. H. Wood. They do an extensive business in shipping grain, live stock, lumber and building material. They ship on an average a car load of live stock every week throughout the year. They buy their lumber and building material from first hands in the lumber districts of the Northwest, and are consequently able to compete in prices with any retail firm west of the Missouri River.

JOSEPH V. WORK, farmer, Section 30, P. O. Robinson, was born near Chambersburgh, Franklin Co., Penn., July 12, 1829. During the early portion of his life, was employed at farming and clerking in a general merchandise store. When twenty-one years old, he removed to Tazewell County, Ill. Here he married, in the spring of 1869, Miss Emma Wooden, who was born in New Jersey. In May of the same year, Mr. Work came to Kansas, and located on the farm where he now resides. This was then wild, unbroken prairie land, consisting of 140 acres; but by industry and a great deal of hard labor, Mr. Work has transformed it into a fertile, well improved farm, outlined with a beautiful hedge fence. He has a large orchard, from which he will realize this year over 250 bushels of apples and 300 bushels of peaches. The buildings consist of a good two story frame house, barn 32x50, and smaller buildings, such as granaries, etc., necessary on a well regulated farm.

(ed. note: following bio originally followd WYNKOOP)

DAVID D. WORK, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 21, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Mercersburg, Franklin Co., Pa., June 24, 1837, and lived in his native State until his tenth year when his parents moved to Tazewell County, Ill., where Mr. W. lived until the spring of 1872, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married March 30, 1875, in Brown County, to Miss Catharine Dansberger, a native of Bavaria, Germany. They have two children, Charles Edmund and Margaret Ellen. Mr. Work owns a valuable upland farm of 160 acres, nearly all surrounded by a handsome Osage orange hedge. It has ninety acres under cultivation, the remainder being meadow and pasture land. In front of his handsome dwelling is a young and thrifty orchard, which contains 100 apple and 300 peach trees. There is also an abundance of small fruit on the place. The farm is well watered by springs and wells. The improvements are first class in every particular, and consist of a new frame dwelling, containing four rooms and cellar, a new and convenient frame barn, 18x36, corn cribs, granary, smokehouse, etc. Mr. Work raises from 75 to 100 bushels of wheat, 200 to 300 bushels of oats, 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of corn yearly. Keeps 20 to 25 head of stock cattle, 40 to 50 head of stock hogs and 7 head of horses and mules. He is a live energetic and intelligent farmer, a good citizen and a popular gentleman in the community in which he lives.

JOHN WYNKOOP, blacksmith and wheelwright, came to Kansas in February, 1865, and located at Wathena. He moved from Wathena to Robinson, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, also of Robinson Lodge No. 158, A. F. & A. M. and Robinson Lodge No. 98 I. O. O. F. Mr. Wynkoop participated in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company C, First California Cavalry. He enlisted at Folsom, Cal., in August, 1861, and was mustered out at Las Cruses, New Mexico, September 7, 1864. His regiment did duty in Arizona and New Mexico and Western Texas, and was principally employed against the hostile Indian tribes. He participated in the battles of Pino Alto, Deadman's Hole and numerous other engagements. He was born in Cass County, Ind., January 1, 1837. He lived in his native State but a short time when his parents removed to Franklin County, Ohio, where Mr. Wynkoop resided until his nineteenth year when he removed to Van Buren County, Iowa, where he resided two years, then went to Sacramento County, Cal., where he resided until he entered the United States Army, after his discharge from the service he went to Fort Union, N. M., where he lived three months and was in the Government employ working at his trade; at the expiration of his time he came to Kansas. He was married in Wathena, in September, 1865, to Miss N. J. Hayes, a native of Ohio. They have four children living, whose names are: Sheridan, Eliza E., Minnie Florence and Charles. Mr. Wynkoop is well known by his fellow townsmen as a first class mechanic and has all the work he can do, and is highly spoken of by his neighbors.

[TOC] [part 18] [part 16] [Cutler's History]