KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 16

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (MARTIN - RUSSELL).

JOHN WESLEY MARTIN, farmer, southwest of Section 27, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Bedford County, Pa., December 8, 1813, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, when he removed to what was then Richland, now Morrow County, Ohio, where he resided and worked at his trade as a carpenter and joiner until September 22, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Brown County, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Baptist Church. He was the first Clerk of Robinson Township, and held the office one term. Justice of the Peace of the same township two terms, and Clerk of the Board of School District No. 20, Brown County, seven years. He has been married twice, the first marriage took place in Richland County, Ohio, in 1840, to Miss Mary Ogle, a native of Ohio. They have had seven children—six of whom are living, and whose names are—William Pinckney, Amanda M., died February 22, 1847; Columbus, married to Miss Phillina Truex, a native of Missouri; Phœbe, married William Parker, a native of Ohio, and a resident of Robinson; W. D. Martin, married to Rachel Price, a native of Ohio, in 1869, came to Kansas in 1871; Melville and Williard Judson. The second marriage occurred in 1861, in Morrow County, Ohio, to Miss Mary Shipman, a native of Ohio. She died in 1879. Mr. Martin owns a productive upland farm of eighty acres, all enclosed and all under cultivation. The orchard covers four acres, and contains 800 fruit trees of various kinds; small fruits and grapes are plenty also. The water supply is good; the improvements are a comfortable frame dwelling, containing six rooms, with cellar. The house is surrounded by handsome shade trees and evergreens, and near it is a magnificent grove of white maple, black walnut, and locust trees, which covers ten acres, and has about 3,000 trees. Among the other improvements are a frame barn, 30x32 granary, wagon shed, corn crib, etc. He had ten acres in fall wheat this season, which yielded 270 bushels; six acres in oats, which yielded 250 bushels, and thirty-two acres in corn, which averaged sixty bushels to the acre. Mr. Martin is one of the intelligent, earnest and progressive farmers of Brown County, and has a high opinion of the county in which he resides.

I. F. MARTINDALE, farmer, fruit and stock-raiser, Section 20, Township 18, Range 3, P. O. Robinson, proprietor of Grovelawn, was born near Greenfield, Hancock Co., Ind., December 6, 1832, and lived in his native State until the fall of 1856, when he removed to Montgomery County, Iowa, where he lived until February, 1857, and then became a resident of Kansas, locating in what is now Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was the first Free-state Constable elected in Claytonville Township, Brown County, which position he held three terms, and Justice of the Peace of Claytonville, Township one term, and of Robinson Township two terms. He was a member of Company C, Major Pope’s Independent Battalion, Kansas Militia, during the late war, and enlisted at Robinson in the fall of 1864, served twenty days, and was discharged at Kansas City. He was married in Brown County, March 24, 1859, to Miss Lucinda Abshear, a native of Virginia. They have seven children, whose names are—Minerva Alice, married to Thomas Glover, a native of Virginia; James A., Calvin F., Corsandia J., Emelia, Isaac F. and Willie J. In addition to farming his own land, Esquire Martindale cultivates 160 acres of rented land. Grovelawn, as his magnificent estate is named, contains 228 acres, and is improved with a pretty house and fine groves, orchards and fences. There are a number of springs and forty acres of wood land on the farm. Esquire M. grows 8,000 bushels of corn and 1,400 bushels of wheat and rye yearly. He keeps fifty stock stables, feeds a car load each of steers and hogs, sells a few surplus horses, owns one of the choice farms of this region, is an honored magistrate of his township, and a successful farmer, having increased his means from less than $200, of original capital, to $15,000, since 1857. He has a high standing in his community, and has an exalted opinion of the country. Shortly after he bought his farm, being of an observant turn, he discovered a fine bed of coal on the northern portion of his farm, which he is now developing and mining under the superintendence of an able and experienced Swedish coal miner. The coal, as fast as it is mined, meets with a ready sale in Robinson and vicinity, and gives good satisfaction. Meadow Brook school, No. 3, is built on what was once a portion of Grovelawn Farm. The land, about an acre, having been donated for this purpose with his characteristic public spirit and liberality, by Esquire Martindale. The school building is a neat and tasty frame structure, has a seating capacity of seventy-five, and was erected in 1875, at a cost of $1,000. The school building is also used as a house of worship by the members of the Church of the United Brethren, Rev. O. A. Chapman being the Pastor. Miss Julia M. Leslie, a graduate of an Illinois institution of learning, is the teacher at present in charge of the school.

JOHN H. MAXWELL, farmer and stock-dealer, Section 23, Town 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson. Mr. Maxwell came to Kansas, May 1, 1856, and located on his farm in Robinson Township, where he has resided ever since. He was Commissioner of Claytonville Township two terms in succession. He was Treasurer of Robinson Township for nearly two terms. Mr. Maxwell was born in Mason County, W. Va., February 17, 1826, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, when his parents moved to Morgan County, Ind., where they resided three years, and then removed to Illinois. Here they lived the same length of time, and then removed to Andrew County, Mo. Mr. Maxwell lived with his parents in Missouri until August, 1846, when he became a teamster in the United States army, under Major-Gen. Price, and went to Mexico. He served in this capacity fourteen months, and then returned to his Missouri home. He then resided in Missouri until 1852, and then went to San Joaquin County, Cal., where he lived until November, 1855, and was engaged in farming and the live stock business. From California he removed to Missouri, where he remained a short time, and then removed to Kansas. Mr. Maxwell was married twice. The first marriage took place March 9, 1848, in Andrew County, Mo., to Miss Elizabeth Deakins, a native of Indiana. By this marriage he had three children, who all died in their infancy. Mrs. Maxwell accompanied her hu band to California, and returned to Missouri, where she died February 13, 1856. The second marriage took place in Andrew County, Mo., to Miss Emelia Abshar, a native of Virginia. Seven children were the fruits of this marriage, six of whom are living: Jonathan S. (married to Miss Emma Reniker, a native of Missouri), Sarah Margaret (died in her nineteenth year, April 18, 1877), Lucy Ann, Thomas K., Alexander, Jessie, and Mary E. Mr. Maxwell has a large upland farm of 480 acres, all of which is inclosed, and 240 acres in cultivation, the rest being pasture land. His orchard contains forty-five bearing apple trees, forty-five cherry, and a few peach trees. The water supply is good, and consists principally of springs. The improvements consist of a fine six-room frame dwelling house, with a large cellar, and surrounded by shade trees; a fine barn 30x36, two granaries, corn crib, buggy house, etc. Mr. Maxwell had ninety acres in wheat this year, which yielded 1,826 bushels; ten acres in oats, which yielded 390 bushels; fifteen acres in rye, which yielded 311 bushels; 105 acres in corn, which averaged forty bushels to the acre. Mr. Maxwell’s farm is well calculated for a grain and stock farm. He raises a large number of horses, cattle and hogs.

MRS. ELIZABETH MAXWELL, widow of Robert G. Maxwell, farmer and stock raiser Section 35, Town 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson. Mr. Maxwell was born in Kentucky in 1818. He left his native State at an early age, and removed to Buchanan County, Mo. He resided in Missouri six years, and in 1854 removed to Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he lived six years. He then removed to his farm in Robinson Township, where he resided until his death in 1869. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He participated in the last war as a member of Capt. Samuel Swayze’s Company of the Nineteenth Regiment Kansas Militia, and enlisted in Robinson in the fall of 1864, served fourteen days and was discharged at Fort Leavenworth. He was married in Wright County, Mo., in 1837, to Miss Elizabeth Iker, a native of Missouri. They had seven children, six of whom are living, and whose names are: Eliza (married to Benjamin Terill, a resident of Robinson), Ann, Joseph, Absolom (married to Miss Rosa Davey, a native of England), John (married to Miss Julia Montgomery, a native of Iowa), Daniel and Hugh. Mrs. Maxwell owns a fine upland farm of 160 acres, which is ably superintended by her son Daniel. The farm is all enclosed by substantial fences, and all in cultivation except fourteen acres which is pasture land; the water supply is excellent. The orchard covers four acres, and contains 400 bearing apple, 200 peach, and a few cherry trees. There is also an acre each of blackberries and raspberries on the place. The improvements consist of an eight-roomed frame cottage dwelling, placed on a commanding height, from which the thriving towns of Robinson, Willis, and the city of Hiawatha can be seen. The house is surrounded by splendid shade trees, and a short distance north of it is a fine grove seven acres in extent. The other improvements consist of a large frame barn, granary, corn crib smoke-house and other out-buildings. Mrs. M. had eighty-six acres in fall wheat this season which averaged twenty-three bushels to the acre; twelve acres in oats which yielded 410 bushels, and twenty-five acres in corn, which averaged seventy bushels to the acre.

JULIUS MEECKE, saddle and harness maker, came to Kansas in August, 1855, and located at Wathena, Doniphan County, where he lived until 1875, when he removed to Robinson, where he has resided since. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 159, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Meecke was born in the Province of the Rhine, Germany, March 17, 1853, but lived in his native country but a short time, when his parents emigrated to America and located in Louisville, where they resided a short time, and then moved to St. Louis, and from there to St. Joseph, Mo., and from there came to Kansas. Mr. Meecke was married in Brown County, May 16, 1880, to Miss Louisa Krey, a native of Missouri. They have two children, whose names are John Earnest and Charles Augustus. Mr. Meecke does a leading business in the harness, saddlery, and horse furnishing trade, and his patronage extends well into the county surrounding Robinson. He manufactures most of the goods he keeps for sale.

DANIEL R. MERCER, teacher of Heckler School. District No. 35, was born in Port Washington, Tuscarawas, Co., Ohio, September 23, 1859, and lived in his native State until his eighteenth year, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson, Brown County, where he has resided since. His mother is still living in Port Washington. Mr. Mercer was educated in the public and graded schools of his native county, and finished his education at the State Normal in Columbus, Ohio. After completing his education came to Kansas, where he has been engaged in teaching almost all the time since his arrival in the State. Since his ninth year Mr. Mercer has been living among strangers, having learned early in life to “paddle his own canoe.” He is emphatically a self-made man and a teacher and educator of rare merit.

ISRAEL MILLER, farmer and stock raiser, Section 23, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Highland, Doniphan County, was born in what was then Alleghany County, Md., March 21, 1833, and lived in his native State until March, 1877, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was married in Alleghany County, Md., June 20, 1857, to Miss Mary J. Dawson, a native of Maryland. They have six children—Rebecca, married to John Staples, a native of Pennsylvania, and a resident of Robinson Township, Brown County; Susan, married to Lycurgus B. Winkler, a native of and resident of Doniphan County, Kas.; Robert M., Louisa, Samuel C., and Fanny V. Mr. Miller owns one of the finest farms in Robinson Township, it is surrounded by very nearly three miles of handsome hedge, and is all under cultivation. The water supply is pure and abundant, and is composed of a couple of never failing wells. There are two young and thrifty peach and apple orchards on the place and an abundance of small fruits consisting of grapes, raspberries, and blackberries. The improvements consist of a comfortable frame dwelling containing five rooms, a large and convenient frame barn, 16x50 feet, corn crib, smoke house, etc. etc. Near the house is a handsome grove of timber which covers four acres, and which contains 1,000 cottonwood and maple trees. Mr. M. raises from 700 to 1,000 bushels of wheat, 500 to 600 bushels of oats, and 2,000 to 3,000 bushels of corn; keeps 15 to 20 head of stock cattle, 6 to 8 head of milch cows, 40 to 50 stock hogs, and 4 head of horses. Mr. Miller is one of the model farmers of Robinson Township, is progressive, systematic, influential and intelligent, and speaks highly of Brown County.

J. B. MITCHELL, dealer in drugs, books and notions, Robinson, came to Kansas in the spring of 1860, and located at Wathena, Doniphan Co., where he resided until 1874, and was engaged in the drug business. From Wathena he removed to Robinson where he has resided since. He was Clerk of Washington Township, Doniphan County, two terms, Clerk of the city of Wathena one term; has been Treasurer of School District No. 26, Brown County, for three years. He is the Postmaster of Robinson, and has been ever since 1875. He is a member of Robison Lodge No. 98 I. O. O. F., and is D. D. G. M. of his Lodge. Mr. Mitchell was born in Washington County, Wis., January 24, 1850, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, when his parents removed to Kansas. He was married October 16, 1872, at Wathena, to Miss Emma Bell, a native of Missouri. They have four children living—Maud E., Grace A., Minnehaha and Vernon E. Mr. Mitchell does a large and constantly increasing business, and possesses the esteem of his friends and neighbors. As a druggist he is known for his skill and accuracy, and has no competition in his business. On the 16th of February, 1881, a destructive fire laid in ashes sixteen of the principal business places in Robinson, among which was the store of Mr. Mitchell. His loss amounted to $2,500 over and above his insurance. But with his characteristic energy, he has almost recovered from his loss.

JOSEPH M. MORRIS, Constable of Robinson Township; manufacturer of, and dealer in harness, saddles, bridles, etc., Robinson, came to Kansas with his parents in the fall of 1870, and located in Cherokee County, where they lived until 1872, and then removed to near Robinson, where they resided two years. Mr. Morris then was placed in charge of the first harness shop opened in Robinson. It was owned and operated by Mr. Charles Hack. Mr. Morris was in charge very nearly one year. He then removed to Robinson Township, where he lived one year, and was engaged with his brother in farming. He then removed to Nodaway County, Mo., where he lived three years, and was engaged in various occupations. From Missouri he returned to Kansas, and located in Robinson, where he left his family while he went to Wyoming Territory where he remained ten months, and was engaged in working at his trade. From Wyoming he returned to Kansas, working part of one summer in Hiawatha and then came back to Robinson, where he has since resided, and where he built his shop and engaged in business on his own account. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 98, I. O. O. F., of which lodge he is treasurer. He was Marshal of Hopkins, Mo., one year, and was a member of the police force all the time he resided in that city. He is at present Constable of Robinson Township. He was born in Shelbyville, Ind., December 30, 1853, and lived in his native State but a short time when his parents removed to Taylor County, Iowa, where they resided until 1870, when they came to Kansas. He was married February 18, 1875, in Robinson Township, to Miss Laura J. Terrill, a native of Iowa. They have one child—a daughter, Ethel B. Mr. Morris leads the trade in his section, in saddlery and harness with good stocks, fine mechanical ability, and a capital patronage. He makes his own saddles, collars, etc., and is a go-ahead business man.

ABNER MURPHY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 7, Township 18, Range 2, P. O. Robinson, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, August 14, 1836, and resided in his native State until the spring of 1871, when he came to Kansas and located in Mission Township, where he resided about four years and then removed to his farm in Robinson Township, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has been married three times; the first marriage took place December 25, 1862, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, to Miss Kathenie Kall, a native of Ohio. She died in 1866. By this marriage he became the father of four children—all of whom died in their infancy. The second marriage occurred in March, 1870, also in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, to Miss Melinda Miller, a native of Ohio; she died in January, 1880. Three children were the fruit of this union, all of whom died young. The third marriage took place in St. Joseph, Mo., in September, 1882, to Miss Emma Robinson, a native of Ohio. Mr. Murphy owns three choice Brown County farms which comprise 580 acres and are principally upland. These farms are all enclosed with substantial fences and are in a high state of cultivation, and rank among the best in the county. They all have fine, large and productive orchards, and are well watered. The improvements are first-class and can not well be excelled. Mr. Murphy had thirty acres on the same farm in fall wheat this season which yielded 960 bushels; ten acres in oats which averaged forty bushels to the acre; fifty acres in corn which averaged fifty-five bushels to the acre. He cut the grass from fifty acres of timothy clover and prairie land which yielded 100 tons of hay. Mr. Murphy has just purchased the elegant residence lately owned by Dr. George W. Parsons, in the town of Robinson, where he intends in the near future to make his home, and enjoy the ease earned by a life of hard and honest toil.

A. J. OWEN, farmer, fruit and stock-raiser, residence on the southeast quarter of Section 21, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Wayne County, Pa., October 17, 1829, and lived in his native State until his second year, when his parents removed to Oakland County, Mich., where he resided until 1849. He then removed to Clermont County, Ohio, where he resided six months, and then removed to Defiance County, in the same State, where he lived until the spring of 1857, when he came to Kansas, and in 1860 located on his farm in Robinson Township, where he has resided since. Mr. Owen is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 98 I. O. O. F., and is past grand of his lodge. He participated in the last war as a member of Company H, Thirteenth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, and was enlisted at Troy, Doniphan County, September 8, 1862., and discharged at Leavenworth, July 20, 1865. He took part in the battles of Prairie Grove and Cane Hill. He was married in Oakland County, Mich., March 12, 1867, to Miss Delia Carpenter, a native of Michigan. They have two children living—Sarah A. and Alfred A. Mr. Owen has a choice upland farm of 400 acres, all enclosed with hedge and wire fences; 250 acres are in cultivation, the remainder being timber and pasture lands. His orchards cover two and one-half acres. The water supply is excellent. The improvements consist of a dwelling-house, barn and other outbuildings.

CHARLES SUMNER PAYNE, dealer in furniture, was the first child born in the then city of Sumner, Atchison County. He was named by the town company, who made out and presented to him a deed for a lot in this once thriving city. His birth occurred September 25, 1857. He lived in his native county until 1868, when his parents removed to Mission Township, Brown County, where they resided until 1874. From there the family removed to Hiawatha, where they lived two years, and then removed to Robinson, where Mr. Payne has resided since. He is a member of Robinson Lodge, No. 98, I. O. O. F., and is at present secretary of his lodge. He was married in Robinson December 11, 1881, to Miss Mollie Townsend, a native of Indiana. They have one child, a daughter—Celia [or Ceila or Cella] Evaline. Mr. Payne has lately started the first furniture store in the prosperous town of Robinson. He has a large stock which was carefully selected and bought for cash. He is already doing a good trade. He is a young man of upright habits, enjoys excellent credit, and with his indomitable perseverance and business tact is bound to succeed.

THOMAS J. PAYNE, blacksmith and wagonmaker, came to Kansas, March 18, 1855, and located at Port William, Atchison County, where he resided until 1868, and then removed to Mission Township, Brown County; he remained there until 1874, and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Hiawatha, where he lived two years and was engaged in working at his trade. Mr. Payne was Justice of the Peace of Walnut Township, Atchison County, for six years, having been appointed by Gov. Shannon in 1856. He was Clerk of Mission Township, Brown County, three years, and at present is Justice of the Peace of Robinson Township. Mr. Payne is a member of the I. O. O. F., having been made a member of Sumner Lodge, No. 7, in 1858. He is at present N. G. of Robinson Lodge, No. 98, and is serving his second term. Mr. Thomas J. Payne took part in the war of the Rebellion as a private in Company F, Thirteenth Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He was subsequently promoted to Orderly Sergeant of his company. He enlisted, August 20, 1862, in Atchison County, and was discharged, October 29, 1864, at Fort Smith, Ark. He was appointed, October 29, 1864, by the Secretary of War, First Lieutenant of Company B, First Regiment, Kansas Infantry, colored. He was mustered out of service in August, 1865, at Little Rock, Ark. He took part in the battles of Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, Van Buren, Honey Springs, Ark., Jenkins Ferry, Marks Mills and other minor engagements. Mr. Payne was born in Brown County, Ohio, March 12, 1830, and lived in his native State until his fourteenth year, when he moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Mo., where he resided until he came to Kansas. He was married in Clay County, Mo., in July, 1854, to Miss Eliza Eiler, a native of Missouri. They have nine children, seven of whom are living—Charles Sumner, who was the first child born in Sumner, Atchison County; he was named by the Town Company; he is married to Miss Mary Townsend, a native of Indiana. John A., married to Miss Elvira Terrill, a native of Iowa; James W., Annie C., Addie C., Lydia and Thomas J., Jr. Mr. Payne is doing a good business in blacksmithing and general repairing; is a No. 1 mechanic and an old Kansas pioneer and one of the squarest men in the county.

MOORSE N. PEEK, dealer in fresh and cured meats, fish, oysters, etc., was born in St. Joseph County, Mich., August 5, 1844, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year when he went to Virginia City, Idaho Territory, where he lived three years and was engaged in mining and prospecting. >From Idaho he returned to his home in Michigan, where he resided three years, and was employed as a baggage master on the Michigan Southern R. R. From there he came, in the fall of 1871, to Kansas, locating in Robinson, where he has resided since. He was married in 1866 in Coldwater, Mich., to Miss Sarah Brown, a native of New York. They have one child, a daughter, Vera. Mr. Peek lives in a fine family mansion in the “Old Town” of Robinson. It is one of the first houses built in the town, and was framed in Cincinnati, Ohio, and brought to Robinson, where it was erected in the early days of the Territory and was for a long time used as a hotel. The house has been vastly improved since it has come into Mr. Peek’s possession. It contains twelve rooms, with a fine cellar, and is built on an elevated site overlooking the new town of Robinson. In addition to this house, Mr. P. owns another fine, seven-roomed frame dwelling, besides his place of business of Robinson. He was one of the losers by the disastrous fire that swept his fine town in February, 1882, losing his shop and contents, and ice-house, suffering a loss of $1,000, with no insurance. He has, however, in a great measure, recovered from his loss, is doing a good business, enjoys excellent credit, and is an honorable, upright business man and a good neighbor.

YOUNG J. POWELL, farmer, Section 6, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Perry County, Ohio, October 31, 1837, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, when his parents removed to Wapello County, Iowa, where he resided until November, 1880, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Church of the United Brethren. He took part in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company K, Second Regiment Iowa Infantry, and enlisted in Ottumwa, Iowa, May 28, 1861, and was discharged at Pulaski, Tenn., December 24, 1863, and re-enlisted in the same company and regiment, December 25, 1863, and finally discharged at Davenport, Iowa, July 12, 1865. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Iuka, Resaca, Dallas, and Atlanta. At the last named engagement he was severely wounded (from which he suffers to-day), and was taken to the General Hospital at Marietta, Ga., where he was confined until the next spring, and then rejoined his regiment at Goldsboro, N. C. He shared in all the marches and battles of Sherman’s army, from thence on until the surrender of Gen. Joe Johnston. Mr. Powell was married in Wapello County, Iowa, September 3, 1865, to Miss Mary E. Aumack, a native of New Jersey. They have two children—Cora C. and Phoebe P. Mr. P. has a fine upland farm of eighty acres, all enclosed, and has sixty acres in cultivation, the remaining twenty acres being pasture land. The farm is well supplied with water and consists of springs and Powell’s branch of the Wolf River flows through the northeast corner of the farm. There is a small orchard and an abundance of small fruits on the farm. The improvements consist of a comfortable frame dwelling, stock stable, corn crib, etc. Mr. Powell had forty-five acres in corn this season, which averaged forty bushels to the acre. He is a hard working, thorough and systematic farmer and is well known for his energy and integrity.

ALFRED RONDEBUSH, farmer and dealer in live stock, Section 5, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas in the spring of 1869 and located on his farm in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since 1872. He is Clerk of School District No. 26, Brown County, and has been for one term. He is secretary of Robinson Lodge No. 159 A., F. & A. M., and a member of the I. O. O. F. He was born in Clermont County, Ohio, July 3, 1850, and lived in his native State until he came to Kansas. He was married in Robinson Township November 21, 1874, to Miss Cornelia Briggs, a native of Luzerne County, Pa. They have two children living, Eliza and John. Mr. Rondebush owns a fine grain and stock farm, equally divided between upland and bottom land, which contains 229½ acres. It is mostly enclosed and has eighty acres under cultivation, the remainder being timber land. His orchard covers one acre and contains fifty young and thrifty apple trees. The water supply is good, there being a number of fine springs on the farm, one fifty feet from his dwelling. The improvements consist of a comfortable five-room frame dwelling-house with cellar, stock barn, two granaries, three corn cribs and other outbuildings. Mr. R. had ten acres in wheat this year which averaged twenty bushels to the acre, and sixty-five acres in corn which averaged fifty bushels to the acre. He makes a specialty of feeding and dealing in live stock; he generally has on hand from 60 to 75 head of cattle and from 100 to 125 head of hogs. He ships the most of his stock to Leavenworth markets. He also has a fine stock of poultry on hand, included among which are Muscovy ducks, spangled Poland chickens, Guinea hens, etc. He has a fine lot of Italian bees on his place, comprising about fifty hives.

MARSHAL P. RUSH, dealer in general merchandise, came to Kansas, November 26, 1870, and located in Robinson Township, where he has resided since and carried on business. He was Clerk of Robinson Township one term. Mr. Rush enlisted, early in the war, in the Missouri Militia and participated in several engagements. He subsequently entered the United States service as teamster in the Quartermaster’s Department. He enlisted April 2_ [8 or 3], 1863, as a member of Company F, Eleventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, at Fort Scott, and was mustered out September 30, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. He took part in the battles of Big Blue, Prairie Grove and many minor engagements. Mr. Rush was born in Cass County, Ind., August 24, 1843, and lived in his native State till his eleventh year, when his parents removed to Jasper County, Mo., where he resided, with the exception of the time he was in the army, till he came to Kansas. Mr. Rush was married in April, 1875, in Robinson, to Miss Emma G. Brown, a native of New York. Mr. Rush is the senior member of the firm of M. P. Rush & Co., which is composed of himself and Mr. E. C. Brown. They do a large and extensive business in dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, etc. They also deal in grain. They are doing a safe and thriving business, which is constantly increasing.

MRS. EDITH RUSSELL, widow of Dilworth Russell, farmer, Section 22, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson. Mr. Russell came to Kansas in September, 1878, and located in Barton County, where he resided one and a half years, and from there removed to Robinson Township, Brown County, where he resided until his death, December 26, 1880. Mr. Russell was a member of the Society of Friends. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company B, Sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted in Fulton County, Ill., August 7, 1862, and was discharged June 8, 1865, at Camp Harker, Tenn. He was present at all the engagements in which his regiment participated, except Stone River, being then absent on detached duty, among which were the battles of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Franklin, Nashville and others. Mr. Russell was brave, faithful and patriotic, and while in the service contracted a disease, consumption, which caused his death. He was born in Fulton County, Ill., November 13, 1843, and lived in his native State until he came to Kansas. He was married March 15, 1866, in Fulton County, Ill., to Miss Edith Knock, a native of Illinois. Three children were the fruits of this marriage, Florence D., Joseph J. and Perry C. Mr. Russell, at the time of his death, owned one of the finest farms in Brown County. It is owned and operated at present by his widow, a thorough practical business woman. The farm contains 160 acres all enclosed and all under cultivation, except 30 acres, which is pasture land. The water supply is good. The orchard covers about two acres and contains 150 bearing apple, 300 peach, 75 cherry, and a few pear and plum trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the farm. The improvements are one of the finest family mansions in the county, planned and built by Mrs. Russell since the death of her husband, containing seven rooms with cellar. It stands on a commanding elevation and is surrounded by handsome evergreens and shade trees, with also a small tenement house on the property. The other improvements consist of a small barn, first-class granary, corn crib and other outbuildings. Mrs. Russell has thirty-two acres in wheat this season, which yielded 754 bushels; four acres in oats, which yielded 139 bushels; 58 acres in corn, which averaged 50 bushels to the acre; and ten acres in timothy which yielded one and a half tons of hay to the acre.

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]