KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


ATCHISON COUNTY, Part 38

[TOC] [part 39] [part 37] [Cutler's History]

WALNUT TOWNSHIP.

JOHN M. BLANKENBEKER, farmer, P. O. Oak Mills, came to Kansas in December, 1870, locating at Oak Mills, Atchison County, where he has lived since. He participated in the last was as a member of Company B, Tenth Virginia (Confed.) Infantry, and enlisted October, 1864, in Madison, Va., served six months, and was discharged in Buckingham County, Va. He took part in the siege of Petersburg and other minor engagements. He was born in Madison County, Va., April 20, 1821, and lived in his native State until June, 1869, when he removed to Jay County, Ind., where he lived but a short time, and then came to Kansas. Mr. B. was married in Madison County, Va., March 20, 1856, to Miss Helen Hood, a native of Virginia. They have had seven children, of whom six are living: Louisa C. (married to Charles Henson, a native of Kansas), Duane L., Charles E., John W., Opal W., and Helen Avadna. Mr. Blankebeker has a small but fertile and highly cultivated place of fifteen acres near the village of Oak Mills. He devotes his attention to raising corn and fruit. His orchard contains fifty apple trees of the latest varieties. He has 100 bearing grape vines, and an abundance of small fruits. The improvements on his place consist of a neat and cozy four-roomed frame dwelling, stable, corn crib, etc., etc. The water supply is excellent.

HARRISON H. BROWN, farmer, Section 16, Town 7, Range 20, P. O. Oak Mills, came to Kansas in January, 1864, and located in the city of Leavenworth, where he lived one year, and from there removed to his farm in Walnut Township, Atchison County, where he has resided since. Mr. Brown is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born in Mason County, Ky., in August, 1812, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year, and then removed to Platte County, Mo., where he lived until he came to Kansas. Mr. B. was married twice. The first marriage took place January 30, 1844, in Platte County, Mo., to Miss Eliza Black, a native of Kentucky. They had ten children, four of whom are living, and whose names are John (married to Mary Washington, of Missouri), Daphne (married to James Pyron, a native of Kentucky), Sallie and Celia (married to Alexander Moore, a native of Missouri). The second marriage took place September 4, 1867, at Winthrop, Mo., to Mrs. Annie Porter, a native of Polk County, Mo. By this marriage they have one child, a daughter, Amanda. Mr. B. has a small but fine farm of forty acres, part upland and part cotton land. It is all enclosed, eighteen acres under cultivation; the balance is pasture and timber land. The water supply is fine. His orchard contains seventy-five bearing apple trees and a few pear and cherry trees. The improvements consist of a three-roomed frame and log house, stocks table and smoke house. His wheat averaged sixteen bushels to the acre; his corn, forty bushels.

JOHN DAVITZ, general merchant, Oak Mills, came to Kansas in February, 1868, locating in the city of Atchison, where he lived one year. From there he removed to Millwood, Leavenworth Co., where he lived five years, and was engaged in the milling business. From Millwood he came to Oak Mills, Walnut Tp., Atchison Co., where he has resided ever since. While residing at Oak Mills he was for the first three years engaged in the mills there, and since then has been engaged in his present business. Mr. Davitz is the Postmaster at Oak Mills, which position he has held for three years past. He is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. D. in addition to superintending his large and constantly increasing trade, manages his fine cotton farm of fifty-eight acres. His barn and stables are new and commodious. His orchard covers two acres and contains 200 apple and peach trees. He has sixty Poland-China and Berkshire hogs, twenty-three head of fine cattle and two horses on his farm. The water supply is excellent, there being two never-failing wells of pure cool water near his store. Mr. D. 's farm is all enclosed, all in cultivation, and this year, is all in corn which promises an enormous yield. Besides corn he raises cattle, hogs and horses. In addition to his farm he owns the whole village of Oak Mills, eight acres which contain seven buildings besides his store. He also deals extensively in lumber, wood, rock lime, pork, etc. He is a young and energetic merchant and does a safe and large trade.

FERDINAND JAEDICKE, farmer and stockraiser, P. O. Oak Mills, came to Kansas in August, 1858, locating at Leavenworth, where he lived until 1863, and then removed to Walnut Township, Atchison County, where he has since resided. Mr. J. participated in the war of the Rebellion as Second Lieutenant of Company K, Second Regiment Kansas Infantry, and enlisted in the summer of 1862 at Leavenworth and was mustered out of service in the same city in the fall of 1862. He took part in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Shelbina and other minor engagements. He was also in the German army during the years of 1847 - 48, - '49, He was born in Prussia, December 25, 1828, and lived in his native country until 1854 when he came to America and first settled in Buffalo, N. Y., where he lived five years, and then came to Kansas. He was married in Prussia in November, 1854, to Miss Sophie Schickel, a native of Hanover, Germany. They have three children - William L., Emma and Augusta. He owns a two hundred acre farm, which is all enclosed with substantial fences. One hundred acres are in cultivation, the remainder being timber land. The improvements are a new, roomy, frame dwelling house, new barn, granary, wagon-house and corn crib. His orchard covers eight acres and contains 800 apple, 300 peach and 100 cherry trees. He also has one acre covered in a vineyard, which contains 1,000 vines. He devotes his principal attention to raising wheat, corn, cattle, hogs and horses. His wheat this season will average thirty bushels to the acre. Owing to the drought he will only have two-thirds of a crop of corn this fall. It will, however, average fifty bushels to the acre. When Mr. Jaedicke, came to Kansas he was in very poor circumstances financially, but by hard work and rigid economy, he now ranks among the wealthy farmers of his county.

MOSES LYNCH, farmer and stockraiser, Section 21, Township 7, Range 17, P. O. Mount Pleasant, came to Kansas in the spring of 1873, and located on his farm in Walnut Township, Atchison County, where he has resided since. Mr. Lynch was Road Overseer of District No. 3, Walnut Township, one year. He is a member of St. Patrick's Catholic Church. Mr. L. was born in County Wexford, Ireland, January 6, 1826, and lived in his native country until his twentieth year, and then emigrated to America and located in Chester County, Pa., where he resided ten years, and was engaged in the lead and silver refining. From Pennsylvania he went to Staten Island, N. Y., where he lived seven years and was engaged working at his trade. From New York, he went to Colorado, where he lived until he came to Kansas. Mr. Lynch was married in August, 1847, in County Wexford, Ireland, to Miss Bridget Byrn, a native of Ireland. They have eight children living - Marcella, (married to Michael Grady, a native of Ireland and a resident of Atchison); John B., Thomas M., Michael A., Daniel R., Moses T., Mary J., and Catherine F. Mr. Lynch has a fine upland farm of eighty acres, all enclosed and under cultivation. The water supply is good. His orchard covers four acres, and contains two hundred apple trees. The improvements consist of an eleven-roomed frame dwelling house, stock stables, granary, etc. He had thirty-four acres in wheat this season, which averaged twenty-five bushels to the acre, and twenty-eight acres in corn, which averaged forty bushels to the acre. His oats averaged thirty bushels to the acre.

WILLIAM E. OLIPHINT, farmer and fruit raiser, P. O. Oak Mills, was born in Walnut Township, Atchison County, September 5, 1857, where with the exception of two years spent in attending an academy in Weston, Mo., he has always resided. He is Clerk of the Board of School District No. 33, Atchison County. Mr. Oliphint was married in Weston, Mo., November 8, 1881, to Miss Lydia Frankie Robbins, a native of Missouri. He has a choice upland farm of sixty acres, pleasantly situated on the Atchison and Leavenworth road, one and a half miles from the village of Oak Mills. The farm is all enclosed, and all in cultivation except sixteen acres, which is timber land. The orchard covers twenty acres, and contains 1,900 apple trees, 100 peach and twenty-five cherry trees, all of the finest varieties. There are also 300 bearing Concord grape vines, and an abundance of small fruits on the property. The water supply is excellent, there being two splendid springs that flow through the farm. The improvements consist of a new eight-room frame dwelling house, large frame barn, wagon shed and new smoke-house.

J. H. POTTER, farmer and carpenter, P. O. Mt. Pleasant. Came to Kansas in 1860 and located in Jefferson County, where he resided until February, 1862, when he enlisted in St. Joseph, in Company K, Fifth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, and was discharged from the United States service June 22, 1863, in the same city. He participated in the battles of Sibley, Mo., and in numerous engagements with Quantrell in southern Missouri. He also participated in several different battles with Poindexter in northern Missouri, causing the defeat and demoralization of Poindexter's entire army, amounting to nearly three thousand men General Poindexter himself being captured. Mr. Potter was a brave and heroic soldier. He underwent a great many hardships, passing through them all without a gunshot wound of any kind until the spring of 1863, when near Kansas City, Mo., while acting under orders of Lieut. -Colonel Phillip A. Thompson, his horse fell with him, causing a severe and painful wound in his left leg. For his brave and daring exploits he received two promotions. Mr. Potter has been clerk of School District No. 68, Jefferson County, for one year, and is at present road overseer of District No. 34, Walnut Township, Atchison County. He is a member of the Christian Church. He was born in Jefferson County, Ky., June 11, 1834, and lived in his native State until his fourth year, when his parents moved to Lafayette County, Mo., where they resided two years, and then removed to Buchanan County, in the same State, where he resided until he came to Kansas. He was married twice. The first marriage took place in March, 1858, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Isabel Barnes, a native of Kentucky. She died in 1859. One child, a daughter, Beatrice, was the fruit of this marriage. The second marriage occurred February 14, 1866, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Ermina Frances Cobb, a daughter of Colonel Cobb, of Kentucky. She died in 1869. By this marriage he had one child, a son, named Jesse.

HON. JOSEPH POTTER, farmer, was one of the pioneers of Walnut Township, being the first settler on Stranger Creek, settling at a point three miles south of the village of Mount Pleasant, in June, 1854, where he built a cabin and moved his family to it in September of that year, and lived there until 1857, when he bought on Section 20, Township 7, Range 21, Walnut Township. He has 200 acres of land, all under cultivation, with good buildings, hedge and wire fences, grove, orchard, and other improvements. Was born in Lincoln County, Ky., April 4, 1819. At fifteen he was apprenticed to learn cotton spinning at Shelbyville, and served three years at that occupation. In 1841 he moved to Buchanan County, Mo., and settled on a farm about half way between Weston and St. Joseph, where he remained until his removal to this State. Was married March 4, 1852, in Buchanan County, Mo., to Miss Minerva Wyley, and has seven children, viz: Celia, Frances, Thomas J., Phoebe A., Samuel L., Josephine and John J. Mr. Potter has at all times been identified with the political issues of the day, and was a delegate to the first Free-state convention held in this county. In 1846 he enlisted in Company B of the Missouri Battalion and served in New Mexico. While at Santa Fe he was taken with fever, which incapacitated him from further duty, and in fall of 1847 was discharged from service. In 1861, on the breaking out of the war, he helped raise a company of Home Guards, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant of Company H. Shortly afterward the company joined the Fifth Kansas Cavalry, but he being physically incapable of performing military duty, was not mustered into service. In 1880 was elected to the Legislature, and during the session of 1881 served with marked ability. Is an active member of the Temperance League. Has been a member of the Christian Church for the past forty-three years.

GEORGE W. REDMON, physician and surgeon, Oak Mills, came to Kansas in the fall of 1869, locating at Mount Pleasant, Atchison County, where he resided two years and practiced his profession. From there he removed to Oak Mills, where he has resided since. He was Township Treasurer of Walnut Township one term, and at present is Justice of the Peace of the same township. He was born October 19, 1848, in Bourbon County, Ky., where he lived until his fifth year, when his parents removed to Cooper County, Mo., where they lived eight years, and from there removed to Platte County, Mo., where they lived until 1872, when they removed to Kansas City. From Platter County, Doctor R. went in the fall of 1865 to Arrow Rock, Saline County, Mo., where he entered the office of his uncle, Dr. H. B. Redmon, where he read medicine for nearly three years, and then attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, where he graduated in 1869. Shortly after graduating he commenced the practice of his chosen profession in Mount Pleasant. He was married December 21, 1873, in Oak Mills, to Miss Annie E. Douglas, a native of Missouri. They have four children - Ethel, Edith, Virginia and Georgie. Dr. Redmon is a young and successful practitioner, and is held in high esteem by his neighbors and patients, as his constantly increasing practice sufficiently attests. He has twenty-four acres of ground surrounding his neat and cozy dwelling. The lawn in front of his house is filled with fruit and shade trees, many of the former literally bending and breaking under the fruit with which they are laden. His residence is situated on a high elevation, and commands a fine view of the Missouri River, and the City of Weston, Mo. Among the Doctor's fruit trees are the latest and most approved varieties of apple and peach trees. His vineyard contains 250 vines, principally of Concord, Isabella, Catawba and Early Ives varieties. The water supply is good; he has a large cistern near the door of his house, and a splendid well of water near his barn. He raises his own pork and garden vegetables. Dr. R. laid eighteen acres in wheat this year, which averaged over thirty bushels to the acre. The remainder of his land is in corn and tomatoes. His place is situated on the Atchison and Leavenworth road near the village of Oak Mills.

HENRY SACKS, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Oak Mills, came to Kansas in April, 1855, and first located at Leavenworth, where he became steward of the Government mess house at the fort. He was thus engaged until October 1, 1857, when he entered a farm of 160 acres in Walnut Township, Atchison County, on which he immediately moved and on which he has resided ever since. He was Road Overseer of Walnut Township for four years, and member of the School Board of District No. 33, Atchison County, three terms. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. He took part in the last war, during the Price Raid, as a member of Company A, Second Regiment Kansas Militia, and enlisted in Walnut Township, in September, 1864; served fourteen days, and was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth. He was born in Prussia, June 11, 1827, and lived in his native country until 1854, when he emigrated to America and first located at Galveston, Texas, where he lived seven months and then came to Kansas. He has been married twice: the first marriage took place in Galveston, Texas, December 25, 1854, to Miss Dora Knauch, a native of Prussia. They had four children, three of whom are living - John Henry, William and Harvey. The second marriage took place at Kickapoo Township, February 17, 1867, to Miss Rhoda A. Johnson, a native of Missouri. They have had eight children - Albert, John Adam, Joseph Franklin, Nancy Jane, Dora, Mary Olive, George Washington and Amy Matilda. Since the original entry on his farm, Mr. Sacks has purchased 160 acres more, contiguous to and adjoining his first farm, thus making the entire amount of land owned by him 320 acres. His farm is all upland, and is one of the finest and most fertile in the county of Atchison. It is all enclosed, and all in cultivation except seventy acres, which is timber and pasture land. His orchard covers ten acres, and has in it 900 apple, fifty peach and fifty cherry trees. The vineyard contains about 100 vines. Mr. S. devotes his attention principally to raising wheat, corn and fine stock of all descriptions. He has sixty-five acres in wheat this season, which yielded 2,000 bushels, an average of over thirty bushels to the acre. He has forty-five acres in corn this year, which promises to yield sixty bushels to the acre. He has two acres in potatoes the present season. The same ground last year yielded 400 bushels of the same tubers, which were sold for $1. 10 per bushel in the Leavenworth market. Mr. S. has on his farm ten horses and mules, twenty head of fine cattle, and eighty head of Poland China hogs. The improvements on the farm are a five-roomed frame dwelling house, large sized stock barn, granary, corn-crib, smoke-house and wagon shed. The supply of water is abundant and never-failing, there being two good wells and three fine springs, one of which flows for half a mile through the farm. Mr. Sacks also served three years in the German army, previous to coming to America, being a member of the Sixth Company of the Kaiser Alexander Regiment. He took part in the Schleswig-Holstein war in 1848, and participated in several engagements in the German Revolution of '48, and still later in the campaign of Saxony.

JOHN L. WADDLE, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Oak Mills, came to Kansas in November, 1854, locating in Easton Township, Leavenworth County, where he resided until the fall of 1860 when he removed to Walnut Township, Atchison County, where he has since resided. He has held all the various township offices, from Road Overseer to Trustee; has been a member of the School Board of his district ever since he has been in Kansas; and was the first Postmaster of Oak Mills, holding the office for two years. He is a member of the Baptist Church and of Kickapoo Lodge, No. 4, A., F. & A. M. He participated in the last war as a Sergeant of Company B, Twelfth Kansas Cavalry. He enlisted in the spring of 1863, at Oak Mills, and was mustered out at Sumner, in November, 1864. He took part in a number of engagements, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Independence, Mo., but was soon thereafter paroled. He was born June 25, 1835, in Pulaski County, Ky., and lived in his native State until his nineteenth year, when he came to Kansas. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place January 20, 1859, in Leavenworth County, to Miss Elizabeth Wright, a native of Kentucky. They had six children, two of whom are living - Ida I. and Andrew J. The second marriage occurred in the city of Leavenworth, April 13, 1874, to Miss Alice Boten, a native of Kansas. By this marriage he had four children, three of whom are living - James, George A., and Oliver L. Mr. Waddle has a farm of 400 acres - 150 acres upland, balance bottom land; 200 acres are in cultivation. His orchard covers eight acres, and contains 400 apple, 600 peach, 200 cherry, and a few pear trees. His vineyard contains 200 vines. He raises wheat, corn, hogs, cattle, and horses. His wheat this season averaged thirty bushels to the acre. His corn will average fifty bushels. The improvements on his farm consist of a new frame dwelling house, containing five rooms; large new barn, granary, corn-crib, smoke-house, etc. The water supply is excellent, there being three never-failing wells on the property. The educational facilities are handy, the schoolhouse of District No. 34 being across the road from his dwelling. Mr. Waddle is one of the enterprising and get-ahead farmers of his township, and is very popular among his neighbors, as his frequent elevation to office shows.

SHANNON TOWNSHIP.

Eight miles from Atchison, in Shannon Township, is the St. Louis Catholic Church in charge of Father John Staeder, O. S. B. It was established in 1880, and has now a membership of some forty families.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

CHARLES ALLBRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Good Intent, was born in Washington County, Pa., in 1825, and at fourteen years of age went to work at Monongahela, in the Glass Works, and became a thorough workman in all branches of the trade. In 1846, went to Elizabethtown, Pa., and worked at his trade until 1848, when he went to Brownsville, at which place he worked at his trade until his removal to Kansas in 1870, where he bought a farm and engaged in farming until the present time. He has 160 acres, all in cultivation, with orchard, grove, and hedge fences. Was married, June 3, 1846, at Monongahela City, Pa., to Miss Martha Chess, who was born in Washington, Pa. They have seven children - Mary A., John C., Henry B., Viola J., Charles S., Elmer E., Daisy B. Was elected Township Trustee in 1881, and re-elected in 1882. Is a member of the Brownsville, Pa. Lodge, No. 51, I. O. O. F., and of Redstone Fort Encampment, No. 70, of the same place.

L. P. DU BOIS, farmer and stock dealer, Good Intent P. O., was born in Salem County, N. J., in 1834, and reared in that State. In 1858, came to this State and located in Atchison, where he clerked for P. R. King until 1859, when he went to Fort Kearney, Neb. with a wagon train as assistant wagon master, and on his return went to Denver, Colo. with a wagon train as wagon master; arrived in the summer of 1859, where he remained until 1860, when he went to Fort Garland, N. M. Returning to Colorado, he engaged in prospecting through the district where Leadville now stands. He prospected until 1862, when he returned to New Jersey, and farmed for a year, when he went to Philadelphia and ran a restaurant until 1865, when he came to this county and engaged in farming. In 1868, bought his present farm of 160 acres, and has it all under cultivation, with a fine grove, and 200 fruit trees, and devotes his time to stock feeding. Is largely interested in New Mexico gold and silver mines, principally in the White Oak Mining District, and has an interest in eight mines, among which are the Hannibal, Du Bois, Little Maggie, Hiawatha, and Home-stake. Was married, in 1863, to Miss Sallie Jones, at Elmer, N. J. They have two children - Carrie J. and Samuel. Was elected Trustee of Shannon Township, in 1876, and served for two years.

McPIKE & FOX (see at end of section - ed. )

C. M. STREEPER, farmer an postmaster, Good Intent, was born in Cumberland County, N. J., in 1824; his father died the same year of his birth, and his mother dying when he was ten years old, he went to live with a relative. In 1842, commenced to learn the carpenter's trade, and worked at it until 1854, when he bought a general store at Daretown, N. J., which he ran until 1857, when he engaged in farming near that place. In 1871, he sold his farm and moved to this county, settling at his present location, where he has 120 acres all under cultivation, and raises small grain and potatoes, of the latter crop, he is the largest grower in the county. In 1873, in the establishing of the Good Intent post office, he was appointed postmaster, and has held the office ever since. Was married at Philadelphia, Pa., in 1847, to Miss Rebecca Du Bois. They have six children living - Rollins, Alice, Howard, Kate, Clarence E. and Emma D. Is a member of Cincinnatus Lodge, No. 85, I. O. O. F., of Pitts Grove, N. J.

H. B. TREAT, nurseryman and fruit grower, P. O. Atchison, is a native of New York, was born in Chautauqua County, April 24, 1825. When thirteen years of age he came to Illinois, with his parents; for several years was a resident of Marquette and Columbus Counties, Wis. In 1857, came to Kansas, locating in Leavenworth County, where he resided one and one-half years, opening and working for a time a nursery in Pottawatomie County in the spring of 1859, when he came to Atchison County, locating one mile from town in Shannon Township. Here he started and opened a nursery until 1871, when he located where he now resides, three and one-half miles southwest of Atchison. Mr. T. has one of the most desirable homes to be found in Atchison County, and the general surroundings indicate comfort and prosperity. He is thoroughly schooled in horticulture and it may be said of him that he was literally bred in this profession. He is a genial and entertaining gentleman, and one of the most popular citizens in Shannon Township. Mr. T. has been married three times, his first and second wife being deceased. He is a Master Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F.

J. R. UNDERWOOD, farmer, four miles northwest of Atchison, was born in Parke County, Ind., in 1836. Came to Kansas in the fall of 1855; settled in Doniphan, Doniphan County. Married Miss Artilla B. Dooley, of Walnut Township, Atchison Co., Kan., August 13, 1857. Moved to Shannon Township, Atchison County, in 1861, and on his present farm in 1867. Was Second Lieutenant in Company H, Twelfth Regiment, State Militia, under Col. Treat, and was called into service to repel Price's raid, and was at the battle of West Port, Mo.; is a member of the Christian Church, and of temperance; has been clerk of his school district twelve years; has eight children living, viz:, William P., Ella M., Charles G., Addie K., Ruby C., James M., and J. Perry.

The following biography was, through an oversight, omitted from its proper place, and is here inserted:

McPIKE & FOX, Atchison City. McPike & Allen, a firm composed of W. C. McPike and Frank H. Allen, commenced the wholesale drug business in March, 1866, their business the first year amounting to about $30,000, including wholesale and retail trade. In 1868, J. C. Fox became a member of the firm, the firm name not being changed. From January, 1868 to January 1869, S. C. King was a partner. In January, 1878, McPike & Fox purchased Mr. Allen's interest, and the style of the firm then became McPike & Fox, which name it still bears. The sales are principally in Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Missouri, and Iowa, the business now amounting to about $500,000 per annum, and giving employment to twenty-nine men. Mr. McPike, of Illinois, came to Atchison, March, 1866, and has been engaged in his present business since that time.

[TOC] [part 39] [part 37] [Cutler's History]