KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


LEGISLATIVE AND POLITICAL ANNALS, Part 16

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS.

In 1864 and in 1868, Kansas had three votes in the Electoral College; in 1872, 1876 and in 1880, five; in 1884 and in 1888, there will be nine votes. The following is the list of Presidential Electors:

Lincoln Electors, 1864 - William F. Cloud, Robert McBratney, Thomas Moonlight.

Grant Electors, 1868 - Daniel R. Anthony, Albert H. Horton, Isaac S. Kalloch.

Grant Electors, 1872 - John Guthrie, Charles H. Langston, James S. Merritt, William W. Smith, Louis Weil.

Hayes Electors, 1876 - Thomas Hughes, John B. Johnson, William A. Johnson, Robert W. P. Muse, Walter L. Simons.

Garfield Electors, 1880 - Robert W. P. Muse, William A. Peffer, Henderson Ritchie, John Schilling, James D. Snoddy.

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS.

From the thirty-seventh to the Forty-second Congress, inclusive, Kansas had one Member of Congress; from the Forty-third to the Forty-seventh, there were three; from the Forty-eighth to the Fifty-second inclusive, there will be seven. The whole State was a Congressional District, until the Legislature of 1873 made a Congressional Apportionment of three districts: A northern one embracing thirty-seven counties; a southeastern one, containing fifteen; a south, central and southwestern one of fifty counties. At the election of 1872, three Congressmen-at-Large were elected; in 1882, four were elected. The following is a list of the Kansas Congressmen, from the Thirty-seventh to the Forty-eighth Congress, inclusive:

Thirty-seventh Congress, Martin F. Conway, Lawrence.

Thirty-eighth Congress, A. Carter Wilder, of Leavenworth.

Thirty-ninth Congress, Sidney Clarke, of Lawrence.

Fortieth Congress, Sidney Clarke, of Lawrence.

Forty-first Congress, Sidney Clarke, of Lawrence.

Forty-second Congress, David P. Lowe, of Fort Scott.

Forty-third Congress - at Large, David P. Lowe, of Fort Scott, Stephen A. Cobb, of Wyandotte; William A. Phillips, of Salina.

Forty-fourth Congress - First District, William A. Phillips, Salina; Second District, John R. Goodin, Humboldt; Third District, William R. Brown, Hutchinson.

Forty-fifth Congress - First District, William A. Phillips, Salina; Second District, Dudley C. Haskell, Lawrence; Third District, Thomas Ryan, Topeka.

Forty-sixth Congress - First District, John A. Anderson, Manhattan; Second District, Dudley C. Haskell, Lawrence; Third District, Thomas Ryan, Topeka.

Forty-seventh Congress - First District, John A. Anderson, Manhattan; Second District, Dudley C. Haskell, Lawrence; Third District, Thomas Ryan, Topeka.

Forty eighth Congress - First District, John A. Anderson, Manhattan; Second District, Dudley C. Haskell, Lawrence; Third District, Thomas Ryan, Topeka. At Large, Lewis Hanback of Salina; Edmund N. Morrill, of Hiawatha; Bishop W. Perkins, of Oswego; Samuel R. Peters, of Newton.

UNITED STATES SENATORS.

The first election in Kansas for United States Senators occurred April 4, 1861. James H. Lane drew for the term ending March 4, 1865; Samuel C. Pomeroy, for the term ending March 3, 1867. A joint convention of the Kansas House and Senate was had February 9, 1865, for the purpose of electing a successor to Senator Lane, which resulted in sixty-eight votes for Thomas Carney; twenty-seven Legislators were excused and declined to vote; two voted blank, and one voted "Against a fraud." To a Republican State Convention, held at Topeka, April 21, 1864, for the purpose of selecting delegates to attend the National Republican Convention at Baltimore, Gov. Carney sent a letter, in which he resigned all claim to the office, and Senator Lane was re-elected January 12, 1865, for a term of six years. July 1, 1866, Senator Lane shot himself through the head at the Government Farm at Fort Leavenworth. He lingered for several days, dying from the effects of the wound July 11. Gov. Crawford appointed Edmund G. Ross, July 20, as his successor and on January 23, 1867, Senator Ross was elected to fill out the unexpired term, ending March 4, 1871. January 25, 1871, Alexander Caldwell was elected as the successor, to Senator Ross. March 10, 1873; Senator Morton, of Indiana, Chairman of the Committee on Privileges and Elections in the United States Senate, recommended to the Senate the adoption of the following resolution:

Resolved, That Alexander Caldwell was not duly and legally elected to a seat in the Senate of the United States by the Legislature of the State of Kansas.

March 11, 1872, the Senate had authorized an investigation of this election by the Committee on Privileges and Elections, and, as a culmination of the matter, the following notification of the resignation of Senator Caldwell was submitted to the United Sates Senate, March 24, 1873:

UNITED STATES SENATE CHAMBER, March 24, 1873.

Sir - I hereby respectfully tender you my resignation as a Senator of the United States from the State of Kansas, to take effect immediately.

Very Respectfully your obedient servant,
ALEXANDER CALDWELL.
His Excellency, the Governor of Kansas, Topeka, Kansas.

Gov. Osborn appointed Robert Crozier, November 22, to fill the vacancy, and on February 2, 1874, ex-Gov. James M. Harvey, was elected to fill out the unexpired term, ending March 4, 1877. Preston B. Plumb was elected as the successor to Gov. Harvey, January 31, 1877, for the term ending March 4, 1883.

Senator Pomeroy was re-elected January 23, 1867, and on January 29, 1873, in the joint convention of the two Houses of the Legislature he received no votes, though on the previous day he received forty votes in the House; ten in the Senate. John J. Ingalls was elected; receiving 115 votes out of 127 that were cast. January 31, 1879, Senator Ingalls was re-elected, receiving 86 votes out of 169. Senator Pomeroy was charged with bribery, and in the legislative report of the Committee on the Pomeroy bribery charges, appears the following:

2. That the said S. C. Pomeroy did, on the 28th and 29th days of January, 1873, pay to one A. M. York, a member of the Senate of the State of Kansas, the sum of $7,000, to influence his vote for the said S. C. Pomeroy for United States Senator.

The following shows the representation of Kansas in the United States Senate: 1861-1866, James H. Lane; 1866-1871, Edmund G. Ross; 1871-1873, Alexander Caldwell; 1873-1874, Robert Crozier; 1874-1877, James M. Harvey; 1877-1889, Preston B. Plumb (present incumbent); 1861-1873, Samuel C. Pomeroy; 1883-1885, John James Ingalls, (present incumbent).

[TOC] [part 17] [part 15] [Cutler's History]