KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


SHAWNEE COUNTY, Part 52

[TOC] [part 53] [part 51] [Cutler's History]

MONMOUTH TOWNSHIP.

The first settlement in Monmouth Township was made August 17, 1854, by Charles Matney, a Virginian, who settled on the southeast quarter of Section 21, Township 13, Range 17. His house, erroneously called the house of "Charles Matingly," was the southeast corner of the Third Electoral District.

During the same year (1854) the following persons settled in the vicinity:

September 1, G. W. Berry settled on southwest quarter of Section 27, Township 31, Range 16.

September 15, Harvey Matney on northeast quarter of Section 20, Township 13, Range 17.

November 15, C. H. Buzzard on northwest quarter of Section 27, Township 12, Range 16.

November 20, James Linn on northwest quarter of Section 14, Township 13, Range 16.

November 20, Samuel E. Thompson southeast quarter of Section 20, Township 13, Range 16.

In the latter part of December, Dr. Moore, William Owens and Mr. Wentworth settled in the place.

In 1855 the following persons arrived: W. M. Jordan, William McCutchen, John Morris, Hiram Shields, William Disney, Richard Disney, J. S. Freeland, Frank Helton, R. O. Johnson, Aaron Coberly, Charles Allen, Harris Lyons, Silas Lyons, Isaiah Cox, N. L. Williams, William Linn, John Helton, J. W. Riggs, T. D. Kemp, and Joseph Coberly. Richland postoffice was established in the fall of 1856. W. C. Murray was the first Postmaster. R. O. Johnson was the first Justice of the Peace, and also first Trustee. The first schoolhouse was built on the northeast corner of Charles Matney's land. It was built of hewn logs, in the fall of 1857, and is yet standing. The first death in the township was David, son of Charles Matney, April 13, 1855. The first couple married in the township were L. Pruden and Miss Eliza Helton, in the spring of 185-, Rev. A. M. Thornton officiating. Charles Matney was the father of the first white child born in the township - born April 6, 1856.

The first sermon was preached by the Rev. W. A. Cardwell, in the summer of 1856, at the house of R. O. Johnson. The only church edifice is located in the north part of the township. It was erected by the Episcopalian denomination in 1870. The Rev. J. W. Lee preached the first sermon. The first Sabbath-school was organized in the year 1857.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

DANIEL ARMSTRONG, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, twenty-five acres cultivated, the rest in native meadow and pasture. He was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1812, making his home there until he came to Kansas in March, 1879, locating on this place. He spent eight years of his life in Ohio. He was married April 19, 1838, to Miss Lavina Gardner. They have nine children living - Mary J., Curtis R., Harriette, James W., Sarah E., Nancy E., Robert M., Lee E., and Ella S. Mr. and Mrs. A., also several of the children, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. A. enlisted as a private in Company F, Sixty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers in 1861, and was with the regiment in its campaigns; was captured in the Valley of Virginia in 1863 and taken to Libby Prison and to Belle Isle and kept a long time, and finally was exchanged in time to participate in the battle of Cedar Creek, Va. From there he went with his command to the left of Petersburg, where he remained until mustered out in January, 1865. His son, Curtis R., was also in the army; enlisting as a private in Company E, Sixty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, July 4, 1861; served with his regiment in all its engagements; among them Seven Days fight, in front of Richmond, Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and the Wilderness, and was mustered out July 3, 1864.

MAJOR L. J. BEAM, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Richmond, owns 320 acres, about 200 acres enclosed, ninety acres under cultivation, one hundred in timber; raises general crops; has a fine place, good stone dwelling and fine orchard; has eight horses, twenty head of cattle, and twenty hogs. Was born in Ohio, March 8, 1839, and when eight years of age emigrated with his parents to Clinton, Ill., and came from there to Kansas in 1856, locating in Douglas County, and came to this farm in the spring of 1866. He was married August 13, 1866, to Miss Sarah F. Ray, a native of New York, whose father, Luke E. Ray, was a citizen of Missouri, in 1861, and barely escaped with his life to Kansas, bringing his family, but losing all his property, for his known Union sentiments. They have five children - Dolfo R., Bonnie M., Cora Lee, Florence M. and Rose. Major B. was one of the Free-state men in the early history of Kansas and in all the engagements of those early battles; was in the Cavalry under old John Brown, when they made the attack on Col. Treadwell's camp of Georgia; was under Captain Sam Walker, when he took Titus' Fort and was well acquainted with all the Free-state leaders; entered the service as Second Lieutenant of Company D, Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry, and was recruiting his company at Lawrence at the time of the Quantrell raid, but the day before had gone with a wagon to Leavenworth after arms for his men, and saw the smoke from the burning town, but thought it a prairie fire; had seventeen out of twenty-two of his men massacred; served with his company in all their campaigns, being promoted to First Lieutenant and Captain of his company and Major of the regiment. He was mustered out in October, 1865. Participated in Price's raid, where he acted as Adjutant General to General Blair. Resigned after four and one-half years service as Justice of the Peace, and has been on the School Board for fourteen years.

CHARLES BESSANT, farmer, Section 31, P. O. Topeka, owns 193 acres, about eighty acres in cultivation and the rest in pasture and native meadow. His crops are wheat, oats, corn, flax and millet. He was born in Marchwood, Eng., May 6, 1843; at the age of ten years went to sea, following that calling continually, going to China, Japan, East and West Indies, South America, etc., and came to the United States in 1869, going to Cleveland, Ohio and sailing on the lakes for ten years as mate of his brother's vessel, coming to Kansas in 1879, locating on his present farm. He was married in 1875 on Christmas day to Miss Jane M. Killey, who is a native of the Isle of Man. They have three children - Blanche, Clyde and George. Mrs. B. is a member of the Episcopal Church.

CHAS. D. BUSH, farmer and stock raiser, Section 25, P. O. Topeka, owns eighty acres, about forty-five under cultivation and the rest in meadow and timber. Mr. Bush was born in Dayton, Ohio, August 13, 1846, and came to Kansas with his parents in October, 1857. He was married to Miss Alice Parsons, Christmas day, 1875. They have four children. Mr. Bush has fifty grade cattle and a large stock of high class Berkshire swine; his selections of the latter having been made from the herds of the leading breeders in the West; he has served several terms as School District Clerk, and also four terms as Township Clerk. Mr. and Mrs. Bush are members of the Episcopal Church.

JACOB COBLENTZ, farmer, Section 26, P. O. Topeka; owns eighty-three acres, all enclosed, and seventy acres in cultivation, balance in fine orchard; has a fine stone dwelling, 28x29, two stories, with L 10x10 one story; has four horses, ten head of cattle and ten hogs; was born in Ohio, May 11, 1830, emigrated to Indiana in 1848 and from there to Missouri in 1857, and came to Kansas in 1865, stopping at Big Springs in Douglas County, and locating on this farm in 1866; was married October 20, 1863, to Miss Louisa A. Lambert. They have three children living - Samuel, Lucina and Josephine. Enlisted as private in 1861 in Company L, United States Reserve Corps Missouri State Troops for three months time and reinlisted sic in Company I, Fourth Missouri Cavalry, and served with command most of the time; promoted to Sergeant and detailed in command of a guard of twenty-nine men to take a boat load of supplies to Col. Mulligan, then at Lexington, Mo.; when near that place was fired upon from the river bank, and saw the rebel lines closing in on Col. Mulligan's troops, but thought it safer to go ahead and get the Lexington than to turn back, and succeeded in getting to Lexington after having twenty men killed; participated in the fight at that place and was wounded and when the place surrendered had only four men left of his guard; was mustered out in the winter of 1865 on expiration term of service; has served on School Board two terms; is a member of the United Brethren Church. Mr. C. has a relic of ancient times, being an old German Bible published in 1530, the seventh Bible printed of Luther's edition and handed down from generation to generation in his family.

RUFUS T. CONWELL, farmer, Section 15, P. O. Topeka; owns seventy-five acres and leases and farms eighty acres in addition thereto; his wheat (1882) averaged thirty bushels to the acre and his oats forty bushels; has ten horses, twenty-five head of cattle and forty hogs; was born in Ohio, October 21, 1841, and came from there to Kansas with his parents in 1856, locating in Topeka on the corner of Fifth street and Kansas avenue where his father kept a store; his father sold out and located on a farm in Topeka Township, locating on this place in the spring of 1876; was married February 14, 1857, to Miss Mary A. Dawson, of Mount Pulaski, Ill. They have four children - Caroline R., Creed H., William R., Frank M.; is a member of School Board and has been for three years past; enlisted as private in Company E, Eleventh Regiment Kansas Infantry Volunteers, in 1862, and was with his regiment at Cane Hill and Van Buren, Ark.; also participating in the Price raid, and did duty on the plains; was mustered out August 12, 1865.

G. W. DAVISON, farmer, Section 25, P. O. Topeka; owns 133 acres, about 100 acres under cultivation and the rest in meadow and pasture; raises oats and corn; his oats average sixty bushels to the acre. He was born in Pennsylvania, March 10, 1827, and when a child moved to Ohio with his parents, in 1848 moved to Indiana and came from there to Kansas in 1868, locating in Topeka; bought and moved on this place in 1877; he was married February 18, 1851, to Miss Mary A. McFarland, and has one adopted daughter, Margaret. Mr. Davison is a Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F.

ALFRED A. DISNEY, farmer, Section 18, P. O. Richland, owns 200 acres; about 100 acres under cultivation and the rest in pasture and meadow; raises corn, wheat and oats; sod broken; spring of 1882 yielded forty-two bushel oats per acre; has seven head of horses, twenty-five head of cattle, twenty-five hogs. Mr. D. was born in Illinois, January 26, 1851, and came to Kansas with his parents when a child in 1855, locating on this farm; was married to Miss Clara Zircle, October 30, 1870. They have three children - Loran, Eli and Bertha. Mr. Disney is a member of the School Board, and has held that position for the past ten years; also held position of Township Clerk for four years, and is at this time Township Assessor, which he has been for four years; was in the State Militia during the Price raid on the border in a company commanded by his father, and participated in the Locust Grove Fight, when the company lost three killed, three taken prisoners and three wounded out of a total of twenty-three, the strength of the company.

EMMOR ENGLAND, farmer and stock raiser, Section 25, P. O. Topeka; owns 160 acres, 130 acres under cultivation, and the rest in native meadow; raises corn, oats, wheat and flax; wheat 1882 averaged to the acre twenty bushels; oats, forty bushels, and flax, ten bushels; has seven horses, thirty-eight head of fine cattle, and thirty-four hogs; has a good stone dwelling, two stories high, 27x28, with L one story, 18x18, with porch in angle, well, and cistern. New barn, two stories, 35x52, lower story stone with frame above; corn crib and granary combined, 18x22, and all conveniences for stock and successful farming. His farm is all enclosed as well as having cross fences with five miles stock-proof hedge, besides over 100 rods of stone fence; has also a fine young orchard of nearly 1,000 fruit trees just beginning to bear, and all these improvements have been made in the past twelve years by industry, energy and pluck, as Mr. England started with the bare prairie farm and no money. He was born in Ohio, December 13, 1844, and came from his native State to Kansas in the fall of 1870, buying and locating on this place. He was married January 1, 1867, to Miss Martha Brosius, and they have a family of five bright little girls - Lizzie, Cornelia, Ruby, Effie, Grace, one boy Marian, and the baby not yet named. Mr. E. enlisted as a private in Company B, Twelfth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Cavalry in the fall of 1863 and served with his regiment and company in the Twenty-third Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, his company being detailed for duty at Gen. Thomas' headquarters for a time and engaged in skirmishing and scouting at the time Gen. Thomas was captured by Morgan's men, his company recaptured him. The next day his regiment was with Gen. Stoneman on his raid into South Carolina where Mr. England was captured and paroled, having to walk 175 miles to get back into the Union lines, and was mustered out in November, 1865. Mr. England is now a member of the School Board and has been for the past nine years.

JOHN S. FREELAND, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, seventy acres under cultivation, and the balance in timber, meadow and pasture. Oats averaged forty-three bushels to the acre. Has sixteen head of cattle and sixteen hogs. Came to Kansas in November, 1854, and located on this farm. He has been a member of the School Board for the past fifteen years; was out with the State Militia during the Price raid on the engagements on the Big Blue and at Locust Grove. Was captured at the latter place with a number of others, but made his escape in a novel way. He still held to his horse after capture and having his equipment covered by a citizen's coat that he wore, the Confederates being hotly engaged and wanting all their men, put him on guard duty guarding the prisoners, thinking him one of their men. He accepted the charge willingly, and while their attention was engaged by the action going on, he stole away with his horse and a good shot-gun that a rebel gave him to guard the prisoners, going through a cornfield, and made his escape. Mr. F. was born in Indiana August 7, 1826, and moved to Illinois in the spring of 1847, and came from there to Kansas. He was married February 12, 1857, to Miss Mary J. Lindsey. They have nine children - Hattie A., Hester H., Luther, Lyra, Lidia, Benjamin, John, May and Julia. Mrs. F. is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

G. HALDERMAN, farmer, Section 6, P. O. Topeka, Owns forty-seven acres, rents and farms fifty acres in addition thereto; has forty acres of his own farm in addition, and seven acres in orchard and grass. Born in Pennsylvania January 11, 1836 and moved to Iowa in 1857 and came from there to Kansas in 1859, only staying one year, returning to Iowa and coming to Kansas again in 1865 and locating here. Was married March 9, 1870, to Miss Mary E. Bauer, whose father Adam Bauer is one of the oldest settlers of this locality. They have five children - Oscar L., Charles D., Allen, Frederick and Cliff. Members of the Episcopal Church.

J. B. HALL, farmer, Section 36, P. O. Topeka. Owns 320 acres, about 105 acres cultivated, and the rest in native meadow, all enclosed, and with good improvements; general crops, wheat, oats and corn. Crops all good. Has this year (1882) twenty acres in flax. He intends making sheep-raising a specialty, and is fitting his place for that business. He was born in the State of New York in October, 1832, and in 1850 went to California, where he spent twenty years; then returned to his native State and came to Kansas in January, 1871, locating on his present farm. He is a bachelor and a member of the I. O. O. F.

JOSEPH P. HEIL, farmer, Section 11, P. O. Topeka. Owns 160 acres, about sixty acres cultivated and the rest in native meadow. Has three horses, twelve head of cattle and twenty head of hogs. Was born in the State of New York August 13, 1849. Came with his parents to Iowa in 1857 and from there to Kansas in 1859, locating on Section 15, Tescumseh Township. Came to present location in 1880; was married November 25, 1880, to Miss Lizzie Bahumaier, and they have one child - Frank S. Are members of Methodist Episcopal Church.

DR. M. H. HOWARD, farmer and practicing physician, Section 33, P. O. Richland. Owns 200 acres, all enclosed, 100 under cultivation, four in timber, and the rest in pasture and meadow. Has a fine young orchard, and raises general crops; wheat averages thirty bushels and oats sixty; has six horses, thirty head of cattle and sixty hogs. He was born in Ohio, October 16, 1818; was educated as a physician in the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, taking his diploma in 1841. In 1843 he commenced the practice of medicine in Franklin County, Ind., and came from there to Kansas in 1857, and located in this township, and came to his present farm in April, 1880. He was married April 23, 1843, to Miss Isabel O'Harro; they have five children - Helen M., Marion, Flora Z., Hiram M. and Nelson C. He was in the Kansas State Militia during the Price raid, in Capt. Disney's company, and participated in the fight at Locust Grove, when they were overpowered. He tried to make his escape, but was ordered to surrender, which he did, and when he had surrendered one of the rebels rode up to him and said, "I will shoot you," which he did. The doctor threw up his arm and the ball struck it, going in below the elbow and passing out near the body, passed into the body, where it still resides. After night crawled to a house, and the next day came pretty near being killed by Union soldiers, who took him for a bushwacker, he being dressed as a citizen.

E. D. JACKSON, farmer, Section 32, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, about 100 acres under cultivation and the rest in meadow and pasture. Wheat average in 1882 is twenty-three bushels to the acre and oats forty-five, has five horses, twenty-five head of cattle and ten hogs. Born in Indiana, July 4, 1820, in June, 1845, he moved to Iowa and spent two years there, and removed to Illinois, and came from there to Kansas in the fall of 1869. In 1850 he went to California crossing the plains and was there for two years. Was married October 12, 1842, to Miss Isabel C. Milholland, they have four children - Martha J., Mary D., Amanda L. and Lewis E. Are members of the Christian Church.

HORACE G. LYONS, farmer, Section 1, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, about ninty (sic) acres in cultivation and ten acres in orchard and the rest in meadow and pasture; has ten horses, twenty-six head of cattle and ten hogs. Was born in Susquehanna County, Penn., August 2, 1832, and came from native place to Kansas in the spring of 1856, locating on his present farm. Has been Township Trustee for three years, and served on School Board for three years. Was married November 10, 1876, to Miss Sarah A. Bush; they have three children - Nellie E., John H. and Jennie M., and are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1861, Mr. L., being temporarily in the East, was in United States service for six months in the Carpenters' Department, returning to Kansas in time to to engage in the repulse of Price in his raid on the border and was captured, but was fortunate enough to make his escape, but narrowly escaped falling in the hands of bushwackers by hiding in the grass as they passed, and returned home in safety.

GEORGE W. McCLELLAND, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 29, P. O. Topeka, owns 320 acres, about 160 acres under cultivation and 160 acres in pasture. Wheat averaged in 1882, twenty bushels to the acre and oats forty bushels. Has five horses, thirty-five head of steers and ten hogs. He was born in Sangamon County, Ill., February 27, 1832, and came from his native State to Kansas, December 23, 1881, and located on this place. He was married December 21, 1858, to Mary C. Brown. They have six children - Fred E. is married and lives in Illinois; Frank B., Paul, Arthur, Melvin and Roy, all reside with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. McClelland are both members of the Christian Church.

ALEXANDER McQUISTON, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, about sixty acres under cultivation and the rest in orchard, native meadow and pasture, has five horses, twenty head of catle (sic) and twenty-four hogs. Mr. McQuiston was born in Pennsylvania, February 7, 1834, where he lived until 1855 when he came to Illinois, and from there to Kansas, in July, 1858, locating on his present farm, pre-empting it, the deed being direct from Washington and bearing James Buchanan's signature. He was married August 11, 1859, to Miss Mary Winders. They have one child living, Mary Alice, and two dead, Eddie and Ida. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. McQuiston is Justice of the Peace; has been appointed two terms and elected three terms. He has been a member of the School Board as Clerk and Director.

N. W. MINARD, carpenter, resides in Monmouth Township, Richland P. O. Came to Kansas in the spring of 1879, from Caldwell County, Mo., where he resided nine years engaged in farming and carpenter work. He was born August 24, 1836, in Harrison County, Ohio; resided there until he was of age, and learned his trade of his father. He was married January 7, 1858, at Mount Vernon, Knox Co., Ohio, to Miss Sarah J. Woodruff, of that place. They have eight children - Ida, now Mrs. Cole, of Loup City, Neb.; Emma F., now Mrs. Du Mars of Illinois; Osie C., Royal D., Naoma, Georgie, Effa and Edward. He enlisted, in the spring of 1862, at Mount Vernon, Ohio, in Company B, Ninety sixth Regiment; was with his command at the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs, Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, and Young's Point. He was captured at Bayou Lafouchla, in the fall of 1863, and held fifty-two days, and was paroled at New Orleans. He was mustered out at Mobile, Ala., June 1, 1865, and received his final discharge in July, 1865. He returned home, and moved to Cedar County, Iowa, remaining five years and then moved to Missouri. He is a member of the Lincoln Post, No. 1, G. A. R., and is a member of the United Brethren Church.

JOHN MOELLER, farmer, Section 24, P. O. Richland; owns 135 acres, about seventy acres cultivated, and the rest in timber, pasture and meadow; has six horses, thirty head of cattle and twenty hogs. He was born in Germany, November 13, 1842; came to the United States in October, 1864, locating in Illinois; moved to Atchison County, Mo. in 1867, and came from there to Kansas in January, 1869, renting a farm for one year in this township and located on this place in 1870. He was married August 31, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth Rupie. They have five children - Lena, Henry, Ida, William and Minnie; they are members of the Lutheran Church.

A. M. RIGGS, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Richland, owns 160 acres; about forty acres enclosed, and in cultivation and the rest in timber; has a fine orchard of choice fruit; has six horses, twelve head of cattle and ten hogs. Born in Rockcastle County, Ky., December 17, 1837, and when four years of age his parents emigrated to Missouri, locating in Andrew County, and to Jackson County, Mo., in 1852, and from there to Kansas in 1856, locating on this farm, which was pre-empted by his father who died January 10, 1866. In 1860 was engaged in freighting across the plains to Fort Union. Enlisted in March, 1864 in Company B, Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and was with his command at Little Rock and Duvall's Bluffs, and mustered out in August, 1865 at Leavenworth on general orders. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOSEPH D. ROCKEY, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Topeka, owns 160 acres, about sixty-five acres under cultivation and the rest in timber and pasture; wheat average is twenty-five bushels to the acre, and oats sixty; has seven horses, twenty-five head of cattle and twenty-five hogs; frame dwelling 12x30 with L 12x18, one and one-half stories high; barn 20x40, corn crib, 12x20, granary, 12x16. Born in Pennsylvania, August 18, 1839, moved to Illinois in 1865, and in 1869 moved to Nebraska, staying there one year, and coming to Kansas in the spring of 1870, locating in Osage County, and came to present farm in 1871. He was married October 13, 1864, Miss Mary S. McKillip; they have two children living - Richard M. and L. D. Rockey. Mr. R., wife and son are members of the Seventh Day Adventists. Mr. Rockey was a member of the School Board while in Osage County and has also served here to fill vacancy.

FREDERICK ROUSSEAU, farmer, blacksmith and wagonmaker, Section 24, P. O. Topeka, owns ten acres with frame dwelling, smith and wagon shop all combined. Is a first-class mechanic in all the branches of his business as well as a practical engineer, having testimonials from a number of former employers in regard to the latter; he makes wagons throughout, ironing the same himself as well as repairing every kind of implement used by farmers that can be done without casting; has an extensive farmers' trade extending some fifteen miles north and south by nearly the same east and west, comprising about 200 of the best farmers of this vicinity; he has a number of labor-saving tools and appliances of his own invention and manufacture, for the saving of time in his work, as well as a shop full of tools of his own description, needed in his business, so arranged that he can lay his hands on them in a moment; he has an appliance for shoeing vicious or wild horses, which is complete; he can put a horse in it in a moment so secure that he neither kick, biten (sic) or strike, and can't hurt himself or shoer; also a combined tie shrinker and shoe-corker, an invention for measuring the inside of a mortise and one for setting the proper dish in a wagon wheel, and others which are complete in themselves. Mr. R. was born in the State of New York, July 24, 1834, and went to Ohio with his parents when a child; in 1853 he went to Illinois, and from there to Iowa in 1861, and came from there to Kansas in 1867, living in Lawrence for three years, then locating on a tract of land in Osborne County; but not being satisfied there, he came back to Douglas County in 1876 and located on this place in June, 1878, since which time, by industry and attending carefully to his business, he has built up a fine trade. Mr. R. was married November 2, 1854, to Miss Elizabeth J. Corder; they have four children - Laura E., Lewis B., Lemuel J. and John H. He is a member of the Seventh Day Adventists.

THOMAS TAYLOR, farmer, Section 22, P. O. Topeka, owns 120 acres, about thirty-five acres under cultivation and the rest in pasture and native meadow; raises corn, sorghum, hay, oats and handles stock in a small way. He was born in Herefordshire, England, November 16, 1828, and came to the United States by way of Canada in 1854, and to this State in 1858, locating in Leavenworth, and was married in 1859, on Christmas day, to Miss Anna M. Chapman; they have six children living - Adelaide, Thomas R., Mary L., Edward, Charles and Edith, and one dead - Esther. He located on his present farm in 1876. Mr. Taylor enlisted at Leavenworth in 1862 as private in Company A, Eleventh Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, and served with his regiment and company in all their campaigning in Indian Territory, Missouri, Arkansas and participated in the engagements of old Fort Wayne, Prairie Grove, Cane Hill, Van Buren and others, also the Price raid in Missouri in 1865; was on duty on the plains as guard for mails and stationed at Medicine Bow, near Fort Halleck, where on the fifth of July he had a comrade killed at his side by the Indians, but made his escape and was mustered out at Leavenworth in September, 1865. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

DR. ISAIAH M. TEVIS, farmer and stock raiser, Sections 14 and 3, P. O. Topeka, owns 320 acres, about 150 under cultivation, the rest enclosed and used for grazing and native meadow; he was born in Bracken County, Ky., December 8, 1823, and moved to Rush County, Ind. with his parents when about ten years old, and removed to Marion, Ind., in 1852, and came from there to Kansas, in March, 1874, locating on his present farm. He was married in Rush County, Ind., in 1849, March 25, to Miss Sidney Shellhorn, who died leaving six children - Luther, John, Ezra, Adelia, Victoria and Clara. He married again December 19, 1857, to Miss Mary J. Mobeeley; they have four children - Nicholas, Mary L., Anna G. and Martha H. Mr. Tevis enlisted as a private in 1846, in the Fifth Indiana Regiment, commanded by Col. Jim Lane for the Mexican War; was taken from the ranks and did duty as hospital steward and was afterward detailed as Assistant Surgeon of Regiment, and served in that capacity until mustered out in Madison, Ind. in 1848. When the war broke out in 1861, Mr. Tevis recruited a company and entered the service as Captain of Company I, Fifty-second Regiment, Indiana Infantry Volunteers, and participated in the engagements at Fort Donelson, where on the third day of the fight he charged with his company and regiment assisted by the Second Iowa Regiment, the left wing of the enemy's works taking them by storm, and occupying and holding them. After this engagement did post duty with his company at Memphis, Corinth and other points until mustered out in the fall of 1862, being honorably discharged.

H. M. ZIRKLE, farmer, Section 20, P. O. Richland; owns 125 acres, all enclosed; forty acres in cultivation, five acres in timber and the rest in pasture and meadow; his wheat averages twenty-eight bushels to the acre and oats fifty-two; has six horses, twenty-five head of cattle and six hogs. Was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, May 3, 1843, and when a child his parents emigrate to Ohio and he came from there to Kansas in 1869, locating on present farm. Was married in November, 1863, to Miss Margaret Hullinger. They have six children - Elmer W., Ida E., Hattie B., Harvey E., Howard B., and baby not named. Has been on the School Board four terms, and has in his son, Harvey E., the limberest boy in Kansas.

WM. A. ZIRKLE, farmer, Section 29, P. O. Richland; owns 260 acres, all enclosed and 150 in cultivation, twenty in timber and the rest in pasture and meadow. Raises general crops, his wheat average per acre in 1882 is thirty bushels and oats forty-seven bushels; has comfortable frame dwelling, barn and out buildings; has seven horses, forty head of cattle and forty hogs. Was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, in 1837, and when eight years of age emigrated with his parents to Ohio, where he remained until 1869, when he came to Kansas and located on his present farm. Was married in 1862 to Miss Susanna, Zirkle, a native of Ohio. They have eight boys and have never had sickness in their family and never paid a doctor bill.

[TOC] [part 53] [part 51] [Cutler's History]