KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


SEDGWICK COUNTY, Part 30

[TOC] [part 31] [part 29] [Cutler's History]

MORTON TOWNSHIP.

DAVID BEVERLY, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Marshall, was born in May, 1848, in Cattaraugus County, N. Y. His early life was spent upon a farm, and he continued to reside in his native State until his removal to Kansas in September, 1876, when he located upon his present farm of 160 acres, situated upon the west bank of the North Ninnescah River. He has eighty acres under cultivation, with an average corn yield of thirty-five bushels per acre, that being his principal crop. On March 8, 1877, he was married to Miss Julia T. Preston, a native of Peoria, Ill., and daughter of J. H. and Anna M. Preston, who were natives of New Jersey. Mr. Preston is now a resident of Sumner County, this State. Mr. B. has had three children, two of whom survive, viz.: Alice, born December 24, 1877, and Clarence L., born January 19, 1881. Mr. Beverly is one of the pioneer settlers of Morton Township, there being but two other families in it when he located here. Not caring for any public office, he has devoted his time and attention solely to the improvements of his farm.

WILLIAM CALLIHAN, farmer, Section 9, P. O. Marshall, was born in Pennsylvania in 1822, and is by trade a stonemason. He has been thrice married, his present consort being Miss Margaret Allen, nee Brownlee, a native of Washington county, Pa., and daughter of James and Eleanor Brownlee. He removed in 1850, to Carthage, Hancock Co., Ill., from whence he removed to Kansas in 1879, locating first in Newton, and removing to his present location in July, 1880, purchasing a partly improved farm of 160 acres, 120 of which are under cultivation. He has a large two-story frame house, good barns, etc. In February, 1883, he was elected Treasurer of the township.

JOHN COFFEY, Justice of the Peace and farmer, Section 6, P. O. Marshall, and one of the pioneer settlers of this region, was born in Russell County, N. Y., May 22, 1827. He was married in 1850, to Miss Nancy A. Godby, a native of Casey County, Ky., where she was born April 2, 1835. They have had ten children, nine of whom now survive. In 1860 Mr. Coffey removed from Russell County, Ky., (sic) where he had been engaged in commercial pursuits, to Christian County, Ill., where he resided for four years, then removed to Bloomington, and in 1876 came to Kansas. His farm of 320 acres is half under cultivation. Since his residence here he has been a member of the School Board of his district, and in February, 1880, was elected Justice of the Peace.

JOHN P. DAWSON, farmer, Section 25, P. O. Marshall, was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1823, and in 1836 removed to Warren County, Ind., where he remained until 1864, when he removed to McLean County, Ill., from whence he moved to Kansas in the spring of 1876. May 20, 1850, he was married to Miss Mary Jane Crawford, who has borne him seven children, five of whom now survive - Celina A., born January 13, 1852; Sarah E., January 18, 1853; Louisa E., January 25, 1857; John L., March 5, 1860; Agnes O., December 3, 1866. Mr. Dawson came to Kansas in the spring of 1876, and located on his present farm of 480 acres, 360 of which are in cultivation, with an average yield, of corn, 40; wheat 17 bushels; and millet, 2 tons per acre; and has also made a specialty of stock, carrying from 50 to 200 head. He is one of the few surviving members who cast the first vote in the township. Has been Treasurer of the School Board and Justice of the Peace.

E. C. GOBIN, Justice of the Peace and farmer, Section 5, P. O. Marshall. Was born in 1842, in Northumberland County, Pa., and was educated in Mission College, Selina, Pa., where he graduated in 1861, and in 1863 was admitted to practice at the bar of his native State. During the War of the Rebellion he was clerk in the Provost Marshal's office at Harrisburg, and was superintendent of the Enrolling Department, and also acted as special correspondent for several Pennsylvania papers. At the close of the war he removed to Booneville, Mo., where he practiced law for four years, when he returned to his native State, and edited and conducted the Sunbury Daily, and subsequently was interested in the Morning Express, and the Daily American, both published in Sunbury. Mr. Gobin was married in 1865, to Miss Kate E. Brown, of Louisburg (sic), Pa., who has borne his six children - William, Annie, John P. S., Jennie, Abbie, and Samuel. Mr. G. came to Kansas in 1878, locating here, where he has a farm of 160 acres, 50 of which are in cultivation, corn and wheat having hitherto been his principal crops, and yielding a fair average return: (sic) Mr. Gobin has been clerk of the School Board of his district, and during his term of office was instrumental in causing the construction of the Morton schoolhouse; and also Clerk of the township for two years. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1881, to fill an unexpired term, and re-elected the following year. In addition to the management of his farm, in the cultivation of which he is assisted by his sons, he still continues the practice of his profession.

D. F. HATHAWAY, farmer, Section 36, P. O. Venice. Was born in Ohio in August, 1843, and, in 1852, removed with his parents to Stark County, Ill., where he remained until 1864, when he went to DeKalb County, Mo., where he continued to reside until the spring of 1876, when he removed to Kansas. August 25, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry, and upon the expiration of his term of service, enlisted in the Twelfth Cavalry, January, 1863, and was mustered out in the spring of 1865. Three years afterward he married Miss Margaret Butt, of Noble County, Ind. Their children are Goldie L., born March 13th, 1869, and Frank H., March 27th, 1871. Upon coming to Kansas Mr. Hathaway located upon his present farm of 160 acres, 135 of these being under cultivation. In addition to this he has gone into hog raising, usually carrying 200 head. He has a beautiful orchard of over 3,000 peach, plum and other fruits, while the farm buildings are large and substantial. In July, 1881, he was appointed Postmaster of Venice, now the only office in the township.

WILLIAM H. HILL, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Marshall. Was born in Clinton County, N. Y., in 1839, and is one of the pioneer settlers of this region, having located here October 21, 1872, from Illinois, to which State his father, Mr. Solomon Hill, had removed at an early date. August 8th, 1862, he enlisted in Company F (Capt. John Chicken), Eighty-eighth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which had been partly raised in Chicago. He participated in the engagements at Perryville, first Stone River (where he was taken prisoner, and after a month's sojourn in Libby Prison, he, with others, was paroled and subsequently exchanged, rejoining his company and regiment in August, 1863). Subsequently participating in the fights at Mission Ridge, Atlanta, Adairville, Kenesaw Mountain and Spring Hill, the regiment, after the fight at Franklin, and after assisting in defeating Hood, marched toward Richmond via Alabama and Tennessee, and was at Blue Springs, East Tenn., when they heard of Lee's surrender, and was mustered out at Nashville and ordered to Chicago for final discharge, in June, 1865. Remaining in Illinois engaged in farming in the counties of Bond, Fulton and Hancock, until his removal to this State, his first location being in what is now Greeley Township. Mr. Hill was married, in 1860, to Miss Violet Reeves, a native of Ohio. They have had six children, of whom only three survive, viz: - Samuel, born December 4th, 1868, William, January 4th, 1871, and Charles, June 4th, 1872. In 1877 Mr. Hill located in this township, and in 1882 sold his improved farm of 160 acres in adjoining section, and purchased eighty acres here. Erected his present residence. He has upwards of fifty acres under cultivation, principally in corn. He has directed his attention chiefly to agriculture. He has been elected as one of the Justices of the Peace, but he declined to qualify, and resigned, having no inclination to assume any manner of cares of office.

JOHN McCOMAS, farmer, Section 6, P. O. Marshall, was born in 1849, in Cabell County, W. Va., and is the eldest son of Thomas and Elizabeth McComas. He has always been accumstomed (sic) to farming, and in 1875 removed to Missouri, locating in Shelby County, from whence he removed to Kansas in the fall of 1876, this being his first location. His farm contains upwards of eighty acres in cultivation, corn and wheat being his principal crops. He is at present the Constable of the township, having been elected in February, 1883. He was married in 1874, to Miss Isadore Willgas, of Brown County, Ill., who has borne him three children - Gertrude, born in 1875; Wirt, 1876, and Walter, 1878. Mr. McComas' mother who resides with him, is one of the original members of the Baptist Church Society of this township.

THOMAS McPHERSON, farmer, Section 23, P. O. Marshall, and son of Leonard and Mary McPherson, was born in Ohio, in 1854, and in 1856, his parents removed to, and located in Fulton County, Ill., where his father engaged in farming, and subsequently removed to Hancock County, from whence the family came to Kansas, in 1873 locating in this county, and removing to the present farm in the spring of 1875, and are one of the very few now remaining of the original early settlers of this township. Of the eighty acres comprising his farm, Mr. McP. has fifty acres under cultivation, with an average corn yield of forty-five bushels per acre. His neat frame residence and good barns are sheltered from the full force of the Kansas winds, by a fine grove of forest trees, chiefly cottonwood. Mr. McPherson is unmarried; his father and sister residing with him. He is now Road Overseer and also Clerk of the School Board of his district. His father was one of the thirty-nine voters at the first election held in the township, in 1876.

OLIVER T. SHEARON, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Marshall, was born in Richmond, Wayne Co., Ind., in 1856. He is one of a race of farmers, and has always followed the ancestral occupation. He was married November 23, 1875, to Miss Alice A. Culbertson, also a native of Indiana, and a daughter of Mr. William Culbertson. They have but one child - Rachel L., who was born April 21, 1878. Mr. Shearon came to Kansas, in March, 1879, locating upon a farm, on which he now resides, and which contains 140 acres, in addition to which he has twenty acres rented. There are seventy acres under cultivation, principally in corn and wheat, the former yielding thirty-five to forty, and the latter eighteen bushels per acre. There is also an orchard containing over 300 assorted fruit trees, and he has also good substantial frame barn and residence. Mr. Shearon has been Road Overseer, and in February, 1883, was elected to the office of Township Trustee.

WILLIAM WADSWORTH, farmer, Section 18, P. O. Brighton, was born in England, in 1843, and was brought up in Nottingham, where his father was one of the leading merchants. Mr. W. went to Africa, during the diamond mine excitement, and continued there until the Afghan and Zulu war, being engaged in freighting. Returning to England, until the fall of 1881, when he came to the United States, and located upon his present farm, where he has been engaged in sheep farming, having about 600 of the American Merino. He is unmarried; has always been a member of the Episcopal Church, and is also an A., F. & A. M.

GEORGE W. WALTERS, farmer, Section 21, P. O. Marshall, who is one of the Commissioners of this county, was born in Pike County, Pa., in 1843, from whence his father, Jacob Walters, removed with his family to Dane County, Wis., in 1849, and died there in 1859. The subject of this sketch enlisted January 1, 1862, in Company M, Second Wisconsin Cavalry, which was attached to the First Brigade, Second Division and Sixteenth Army Corps, subsequently being in the Seventeenth Corps, and participated in the engagements at Vicksburg, Jackson, Black River, etc., before and after which his regiment was in pursuit of Forrest, and he was also present at the surrender of Forrest, when his men were paroled, at Grinnell, Miss., soon after which Mr. Walters was under the commands of General Custer, with whom he went to Texas, and was upon frontier service until mustered out, in November 15, 1865, with the rank of First Lieutenant. He then located in and near San Antonio, Texas, where he resided for nine years, and where he, May 26, 1869, married Miss Mollie M. Byrd, daughter of Thomas and Amanda Byrd, of that State. Mr. W. has three children - George W., born May 12, 1870; Byrd, June 29, 1878, and Grace, April 2, 1881. While in Texas, Mr. Walters was engaged in business as a general merchant, in the town of Pleasanton, situated thirty miles south of San Antonio. He disposed of his business there in 1872, and removing to Kansas, located upon the site of his present home, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits, his customers being principally men engaged in cattle business; there then being large herds of cattle brought from Texas, and grazing for weeks here, upon the then untenanted prairie, prior to their shipment from Wichita, to the eastern markets. In 1874, he retired from business, and directed his attention solely to farming, until 1880, when he added stock raising to agriculture. His farm of 320 acres contains 140 under cultivation, with an average yield of corn thirty, wheat sixteen bushels, and millet two tons per acre. He has held the office of Township Trustee for three successive terms; he being the first trustee upon the organization of the township, and in 1876, was appointed Postmaster of Finley, continuing therein until 1880, when he resigned, and the office has since been abolished. He has always been a Director of the School Board of his district, in which office he still continues, and in 1880, was elected County Commissoner (sic). He is a member of Garfield Post, No. 25, G. A. R., and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Walters is the oldest settler in Morton Township, and was one of its organizers in 1876, and one of the judges in the first election held therein, in the fall of that year, at which thirty-nine votes were cast, and one of the representative men of Sedgwick County.

THOMAS H. CORNWALL, farmer and physician, Section 26, P. O. Mount Hope - was born in England in 1850. Is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth A. U. Cornwall. Was married, in 1880, to Miss Phebe E. McGoogan, daughter of Robert and Dinah W. B. McGoogan. Has two children - Ollie B. and Martin L. Cornwall. Came to Kansas in 1878, locating on the the (sic) farm on which he now resides; owns 400 acres, and is engaged in farming and stock raising. Graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, in the class of 1874-75. The same year commenced the practice of his profession in Byron, Ogle County, Ill., where he remained until his removal to Kansas. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; also the South Kansas Medical Society.

W. A. FRAZEE, farmer, Section 8, P. O. Mount Hope, was born in Ohio in 1841; is a son of Jehiel and Nancy Grymes Frazee. Was married, in 1868, to Miss Lydia Wood, daughter of Levi and Rebecca Reeves Wood; has five children - Rosa L., Charles, Edward, Lewis and Birt. Came to Kansas in 1869; located in Doniphan County; remained two years; in 1871, located on the farm on which he now resides. Owns 320 acres of land, and is engaged in farming and stock raising. Was in the War of the Rebellion; enlisted in 1861, in the Second Colorado Regiment Volunteers, Company B. Was mustered out in 1862. Was one of the earliest settlers in Sherman Township.

NICHOLAS GENSMAN, farmer, Section 29, P. O. Ost, was born in Germany in 1848; son of Phillip and Elizabeth Gensman. Was married, in 1877, to Miss Kansas Osborn, daughter of Riley and Jane Osborn; has three children - Oren M., Edgar L. and Nicholas F. Came to Kansas in 1875; located on the farm on which he now resides; owns 240 acres of land; engaged in farming and blacksmithing. Has 130 acres under cultivation; has been very successful in his farming operations, and has also built up an extensive trade in blacksmithing. Has been member of the School Board for four years; Treasurer and Clerk of the township for two years each. Is a member of the I. O. O. F.

CAPT. DANIEL GUNSAULLUS, P. O. Mount Hope, was born in Richland County, Ohio, July 16, 1830; is a son of Daniel and Nancy Gunsaullus; was married to Miss Emma A., daughter of John and Eleanor Mallory. Has six children - William W., Wilson B., Mary E., John, Edmund and Ruby F. Came to Kansas in May, 1871; located on the northwest quarter Section 10, Township 26, Range 3 west, in Sedgwick County, Kansas. Occupation, farmer; owns 160 acres of land, and is engaged in farming and stock raising. He was in the late war. Enlisted at Defiance, Ohio, August, 1861, in Company F, Forty-eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Mansfield, and other engagements with his command, and was wounded at Vicksburg, Miss.; was laid up three months; was taken prisoner at Mansfield, La., and held for eight months at Camp Ford, Texas. During his imprisonment suffered great hardships. Is a member of the Masonic Fraternity.

ROBERT R. HATCHER, farmer, Section 22, P. O. Germania. Was born in New York in 1849, son of Robert and Jane Cornwell Hatcher. Was married in 1877, to Miss Susan Monroe, daughter of Milton S. and Elizabeth Fer?el Monroe. Has three children - Rufus, Cora and Jennie. Came to Kansas in 1868. Located in Linn County; after five years removed to Sedgwick County, and located on the farm on which he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land. Engaged in farming and stock raising. Eighty acres under cultivation. Was in the township one year before its organization. Was the second Clerk of the township.

ELISHA J. HULBURT, farmer, Section 20, P. O. Mount Hope. Was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1838, son of Alonzo and Kadulga H. Hulburt. Was married in 1864 to Miss Sarah Curneilus, daughter of John and Rachel Curneilus. Has two children - Ivan and Inez. Came to Kansas in 1873, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres. Is engaged in farming and stock raising. Has a fine orchard of peach trees and a variety of other fruits now in bearing. Was in the War of the Rebellion. Enlisted in 1861 in the Eleventh Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Company A, three months' service, at the expiration of which re-enlisted in the same regiment and company for three years. Was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Pittsburgh Landing, Shiloh, siege of Vicksburg, and other engagements of his command. Was wounded at the siege of Vicksburg in the left arm. Was in the hospital nine months. Has but partial use of his hand. Was commissioned Second Lieutenant. Was mustered out in 1865. Has been a member of the School Board three years.

GEORGE JOHNSON, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Germania, was born in Michigan in 1845, son of John and Ann Johnson. Was married in 1874 to Miss Emma B. Peck, daughter of Alexander and Sarah Peck. Has four children - George C., Warren D., Frank and Mabel C. Came to Kansas in 1870, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land, engaged in farming and stock raising. Is Constable of Sherman Township and member of the School Board.

THOMAS NORTHROP, farmer, Section 33, P. O. Magnolia, was born in Pennsylvania in 1836. He is a son of Harry and Nancy Cox Northrop. Was married in 1864, to Miss Rachel E. Harvy, daughter of Wolcott and Margaret Harvy. Has one child, - Harry W. Northrop. Came to Kansas in 1870, the spring after located in Union Township and was one of the organizers. In 1874, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land, 108 acres under cultivation. Was the organizer of Sherman Township in 1877; was in the War of the Rebellion, enlisted in 1861 in the Sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve, Company I. Was in the battles of Dranesville, Harrison Landing, Antietam, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Second Bull Run, Chantillia and in other engagements of his command, forty-four days in all under fire. Was wounded four times; first time at Dranesville, second time at Fredericksburg, third and fourth times at second battle of Bull Run. Was taken prisoner twice, but in each instance succeeded in making his escape. Was mustered out in August, 1864. In the winter of 1874, during the failure of the crops from grasshoppers, he supported his family by gathering buffalo bones on the plains, hauling them about seventy miles. He gather thirty tons at six dollars per ton.

J. M. POST, farmer, Section 18, P. O. Woodberry, was born in 1844 in Michigan; son of J. C. and Adaline Whitehead Post. Was married in 1872 to Miss Alice J. Parker, daughter of Joseph and Francina Campbell Parker. Has two children, Howard O. And Earnest L. Came to Kansas in 1868, located in Bourbon County. After six years removed to Sedgwick County, located in Sherman Township, owns 300 acres of land, 220 acres under cultivation, engaged in farming and stock-raising. Was in the War of the Rebellion, enlisted in 1862 in the Eighty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Company A. Was in the battles of Perryville, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and other engagements of his command. Veteraned in 1864. Was mustered out at the close of the war in 1865. Is a member of the School Board, has served for four years.

GEORGE G. SIDLES, farmer, Section 18, P. O. Woodberry, was born in Clinton County, Ohio, in 1835, son of Israel and Nancy Morrison Sidles. Was married in 1857 to Miss Nancy E. Shields, daughter of William and Sarah Houston Shields. Has four children - Julia M., Raleigh O., Nellie R. and Orpha L. Came to Kansas in the spring of 1872, located on the farm where he now resides, owns 310 acres of land, engaged in farming and stock raising. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the Masonic fraternity, A., F. & A. M. Has taken much interest in educational matters, has been engaged in teaching for four years, and has been Director on the School Board. Is Township Clerk.

JAMES C. WINTERS, farmer, Section 20, P. O. Magnolia, was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1853, son of William and Letitia Winters. Was married in 1880 to Miss Julia Sidles, daughter of George and Nancy Sidles. Has two children - Roy R. and Effie E. Came to Kansas in 1871, located in Park Township, Sedgwick Co. After four years removed to his present location. Owns 160 acres of land, engaged in farming and stock raising, has 120 acres under cultivation, has a fine grove of forest trees and a fruit orchard.

[TOC] [part 31] [part 29] [Cutler's History]