KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


SEDGWICK COUNTY, Part 19

[TOC] [part 20] [part 18] [Cutler's History]

GERMANIA.

This is a small town about one and a half miles west of St. Mark, in Garden Plain township. Its population is mainly composed of Germans. It has several stores, a postoffice, hotel, good school and church building. The surrounding county is well settled with a very prosperous class of farmers.

Garden Plain is a very small hamlet in the southwestern part of the township.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - GARDEN PLAIN TOWNSHIP.

WILLIAM BLACK, farmer, Section 13, P. O. Germania, is a native of Orleans County, N. Y., and was born in 1834. In 1859 he was married to Miss Sarah McElroy, who has borne him three children, viz.: William, Sarah and Emma. In the spring of 1878 Mr. Black sold his farm in New York State and removing to Kansas, located upon his present farm of 160 acres, 120 of which are now under cultivation, with an average grain yield of wheat 20, corn 40 and oats 35 bushels per acre, on what is called "second" bottom land. Mr. Black is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM H. BALL, farmer, Sections 8, P. O. Marshall, and one of the pioneer settlers of the township, was born in 1829 in Parke County, Ind., his father, Abel Ball, being a native of Redstone, Pa., and is of German and English descent. Born upon a farm he continued to pursue the vocation of his father with the exception of twelve years spent in running a saw mill, until November 16, 1861, when he enlisted in Company K, Forty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the siege of New Madrid, and the engagements at Tiptonville, Riddles Point, Fort Pillow, Randolph and Memphis; from thence to Helena and up the White River to the Yazoo Pass; thence to Bearskin Lake and Little Rock, where he was mustered out January, 1863, and at once re-enlisted in the same Company and Regiment; participated in the fight at Camden and returning to Mart's Mills had a brush with the enemy in which his Regiment was captured, with the exception of himself and twenty-seven others, who cut their way through and escaped. Proceeding to Little Rock he obtained a thirty-days' furlough, upon the expiration of which he returned to duty and remained in Indianapolis as prison guard until mustered out May 12, 1865, with the rank of Corporal. Mr. Ball was married January 16, 1848, to Miss Lydia A. Adams, of Parke County. They have had ten children, six of whom survive, viz. - Sally Ann, born in 1848 and now Mrs. C. Ellswick, of this county; George, 1850, and who is also married and residing in Indiana; Zopher, 1854, married and living in Illinois Township, this county; Charles, 1857; John, 1867, and Rosella, 1868. Mrs. Ball died in 1869, and July 9, 1873, he married Miss Melissa Rouse, of Iowa, by whom he has had five children, four of whom are living - Howard, born in 1874; Ella, 1876, and Henry C. and Alice (twins), July 5, 1878. Mr. Ball came to Kansas in May, 1874, locating here; 100 of his 160 acres are under cultivation, with an average yield of wheat fifteen and corn forty bushels per acre. He has a very fine orchard of 1,100 peach trees, 800 of which are bearing, and he has also several hundred forest trees. He is now the senior settler of the township. Has been a member of the Mount Olivet Baptist Church since its organization. Is a member of Garfield Post, G. A. R., and in 1876 was elected Justice of the Peace.

N. B. BRYAN, Justice of the Peace and farmer, Section 35, P. O. Lamont, was born in Hancock County, Ind., in 1830, his father, Hampton Bryan, having removed there from Campbell County, Ky., where the family had been represented since 1730. His parents returned to their native State in 1833, and in 1852 the subject of this sketch went to California where he worked at wood cutting, mining, etc., and in 1874 located in Kansas, where he now has 160 acres, of which 115 acres are under cultivation, with a good average yield of wheat and corn. April 12, 1864, he was married to Miss Annie Taylor, of Kentucky, who has borne him five children, viz. - Ada, born in 1865; Taylor, 1866; May, 1867; Hampton, 1877, and Esther in 1878. Mr. Bryan is a member of the Baptist Church, and in February, 1882, was elected Justice of the Peace, which position he still worthily fills.

A. BUDWEISER, farmer, Section 28, P. O. Lamont, was born in the Province of Saarbruck, in Germany, in 1832, and is a blacksmith by trade. In 1871 he took part in the Franco-Prussian war, and the following year came to this country, wither some of his relatives had preceded him. He located first in Pettis County, Mo., where he worked at his trade until four years ago, when he came to Kansas, locating upon his present farm of 160 acres. So far Mr. B. has given his attention to agriculture only, and has had good crops of wheat and corn. He was married in Germany in 1872, for the second time, and has three children by the first marriage, who are all married and residing in this State. Henry, aged seven years, is the only issue of the second marriage. Mr. B. belongs to the Reformed Lutheran Church.

L. A. CADDICK, farmer, Section 15, P. O. Germania, is a native of Bristol, England, and when a child came to this country with his parents, who settled in Shelby county, Ohio, in 1844. August 19, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the engagements at Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill, Harper's Ferry, and Fort McDowell, and was mustered out in September, 1865. Upon leaving the army he returned to Ohio, and August 3, 1867, was married to Miss Etta Shaver, of Auglaize County, Ohio. In 1871 Mr. C. removed to Hancock County, Ind., where he engaged in business, but sold out in 1874 and came to Kansas, locating upon a farm in Coffey County, where he remained until the fall of 1878, when he removed to his present location. Of his 160 acres, 125 are under cultivation; his corn and wheat yield being fully up to the average. Mr. Caddick has five children living, viz.; Lambert, Maggie, Sarah, John C. and Eva. He is a member of the Odd-Fellow and Masonic orders and of the G. A. R.

SIMEON CLARK, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Garden Plain, was born in Kentucky in 1826, and when a boy removed to Missouri, from whence he soon after went to Greene County, Ill., where he remained two years and then located in Pike County, same State, where he pre-empted a farm, which he cultivated for three years, when, leaving the farm in charge of his mother, he went to Quincy, where, for a period of twenty-two years, he was in the employ of Van Dorn & Co., occupying the position of foreman in their large saw mills, when he left to come to Kansas. Mr. Clark was married in 1850 to Miss Susan Wilson, who died in 1855, leaving one child - James W., now residing in Galesburg, Ill. January 18, 1877, he married his present consort, Miss Mary M. Reed, of Mobile, Ala., who has borne him three children, the only one now surviving being William A. J. Clark, who was born in Quincy, Ill., October 3, 1857, and who now resides with his parents upon the farm. Mr. Clark came to Kansas in September, 1873, and after a residence of eighteen months in Wichita, located upon his present homestead, containing 160 acres, 100 of which are under cultivation, with a good average grain yield. In early life he learned the trade of a carpenter, at which he still continues to work, being assisted in the management of the farm by his youngest son. March 22, 1865, Mr. C. enlisted at Grand Rapids, Mich., and was soon afterwards transferred to Company F, Thirty-eighth Virginia Volunteers, and after a year's active service was discharged at Brazos, Santiago, Texas, his term of service having expired, and received honorable mention from his commanding officer for his excellent soldierly qualities. February 9, 1883, Mrs. Clark was appointed Postmistress, of Garden Plain Office. Mr. Clark and family are among the pioneer settlers of this township, there being but two other families here upon their arrival and only one of whom now resides in the Township. Mr. Clark is a member of the A., F. & A. M., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE H. GILSON, farmer, Section 25, P. O. Blendon, was born in 1831 in Livingston County, N. Y., and in 1837, with his parents, removed to Ohio, and in 1846 to Campbell County, Ky., where he was engaged in farming, and where he on May 15, 1851, married Miss Sarah F. Harrison. Mr. Gilson has five children living - Lucy E., born June 29, 1853, George W., August 28, 1859, Thomas J., September 29, 1862, John L., born March 25, 1869, Visa, July 25, 1872, and two - Nancy J. and Harvey L. - deceased. Mr. Gilson enlisted in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 22, 1865, in Company F, One Hundred and Ninety-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served in the Shenandoah Valley until mustered out at Winchester, Va., September 7., 1865. He removed to Kansas in 1876, and located upon his present farm of 160 acres of which 120 are under cultivation, with an average wheat yield of fifteen and corn of thirty bushels to the acre. He has a fine orchard of 500 assorted fruit trees. Mr. and Mrs. Gilson are members of the Olive Baptist church, of which he is the Clerk, and for the past five years has been Clerk of the School Board of district No. 37. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1878, and was in that office for a period of four years and three months, and is now one of the early settlers of Garden Plain Township.

JOHN W. GOSNEY, farmer, Section 35, P. O. Lamont, was born in the State of Kentucky in 1844, where he remained engaged in farming until 1871, when he went to Texas and in 1875 located in Kansas upon his present farm of 240 acres, 185 of which are under plow, with an average grain yield of wheat fifteen and corn thirty-five bushels per acre. He has also found his oat crop yield well. He was married in 1869 to Miss S. L. Griffin, of Kenton County, Ky. Their children are Honora, born in 1871, Charles M., 1873, Carrie Bell, 1877, Maggie M., 1879, and Zuella, born in 1881. As a farmer, Mr. G. has been very successful, and although he has studiously avoided taking any public office, he has always been considered one of the representative men of this township. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity and also of the Mt. Olivet Baptist Church.

CAPTAIN WALTER B. HAMILTON, farmer, Section 8, P. O. Marshall, was born in Perry County, Ill., November 25, 1837. His father, who died when the subject of this sketch was ten years old, being a native of Kentucky; when the war broke out he was in Texas, and at once hastened East, responsive to the call of his country. Arriving in North Missouri early in 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Fourth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, and participated in the engagements at Cassville, Springfield, Jefferson City, Booneville, etc. In an engagement with guerrillas he was shot in the hip and in falling from his horse fell on his head, which eventually caused total deafness, and in the engagemen (sic) at Byron's Ford on the Big Blue his left arm was shattered, necessitating amputation. He received a commission as Captain for bravery and merit, having enlisted as a private. September 22, 1867 he married Miss Catharine McIlvaine, the issue of this marriage being Ora, born April 15, 1869, Donald A., April 27, 1873, and Andrew, January 27, 1878. Upon leaving the army he returned to Missouri, where he held a commission as Notary Public from Governor McClurg. He was registering officer of Worth County. He was appointed Assistant United States Marshal for taking the ninth census. He was Postmaster of Allendale from 1867 to 1870, and Sergeant-at-Arms of the twenty-fifth General Assembly of Missouri. Captain H. came to Kansas December 3, 1874, and located upon his present farm of 160 acres, 120 of which are under cultivation, sixty-five acres this year - 1883 - being wheat. Since his residence here, although he has always taken a warm interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community, the Captain has studiously avoided taking any public office.

WILLIAM H. HARRISON, farmer, Section 35, P. O. Lamont, as born in Kentucky in 1841, and in July, 1863, enlisted at Covington, Ky., in Company H, Thirty-seventh Regiment Kentucky Infantry, and served under Gen. Burbridge until mustered out at Louisville December 29, 1864. Re-enlisting in February, 1865, in Company F, One Hundred and Ninety-second Ohio, and serving until September, 1865, when he was again and permanently discharged. Mr. Harrison was married in 1870 to Miss B. M. Gosney, of Kentucky. They have three Children, Charles W., born in 1871, Flora B., in 1873, and B. C. Harrison, born in 1875. His first location was in Attica Township, in which place he owns a farm of 160 acres. He also owns and resides upon 160 acres in this township, seventy acres of which are under cultivation, his grain yield being exceptionally good. He has held the office of Road Overseer and Treasurer of the School Board of his district, and is a member of the Olivet Baptist church.

WILLIAM HEISEL, farmer, Section 9, P. O. Germania, is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, and came to the United States in 1854. In 1857 he was married to Miss Susan Rathbone, of Livingston County, N. Y., and removing to St. Joe County, Mich., resided there for upwards of twenty-five years; engaged in farming, with the exception of five years spent in Kalamazoo as foreman in the gas works. Mr. Heisel has seven children, the eldest, William being married and residing in this township, Carrie is now engaged in teaching in Attica Township, John, Edward, Charles, Alfred and Nellie. Mr. H. came to Kansas in 1879, locating here, where he now has 160 acres of good land, 120 acres of which are in cultivation, wheat and corn, which yield a fair average, being his principal crops. His farm also contains a good orchard of assorted trees, and substantial outbuildings. He is one of the Directors of the School Board of his district.

G. HAUNDTHAUSEN, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Germania, was born in the Province of Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1838, and is a cabinetmaker by trade. He immigrated to this country in 1866, and landing at New York worked at his trade in that city and Brooklyn until 1876, when he went to Philadelphia, Pa., where in August, 1877, he married Miss M. Feuerstein, who has borne him two children, viz.: Charles W., born September 13, 1878, and Gertrude, born February 26th, 1881. Mr. H. came to Kansas in the fall of 1880, and after a short stay in Fort Scott moved on to his present farm of 160 acres. His average grain yield is wheat twelve, and corn thirty bushels per acres. Mr. H. is a member of the Roman Catholic Church and Democratic in politics.

THOMAS JENKINSON, farmer, Section 36, P. O. Lamont, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1846, and while yet a boy was employed in the large rolling mills and other iron manufactories, his education being gained at night schools at a cost of three pence per week. Upon reaching man's estate he learned the trade of a roller and in 1870 came to the United States and worked at his trade in the States of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. May 16, 1879, he married Miss Josephine Rogers of Troy, N. Y., and in 1880 located upon his present farm of 160 acres, eighty of which are under cultivation, and during the past two years have yielded a fair average grain return. Mr. J. has no children. He intends going into the business of cattle breeding in addition to agriculture. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity.

HARRISON KEITH, farmer, Section 1, P. O. Germania, was born in Jennings County, Ind., in 1834. Son of M. P. and Nancy Lewis Keith. Was married in 1862 to Miss Nancy J. Cromwell, daughter of Vincent and Deborah Cromwell. Has two children, Ida B. and Ada M. Keith. Came to Kansas in 1873 and located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land, engaged in general farming. Was one of the first settlers in Garden Plain Township, and one of the organizers of the township. Was its first Treasurer, appointed by the County commissioners, and was elected to the same office at the first election held in the township. Was elected Trustee in 1875 and again in 1879. In 1872 was elected Clerk and still holds the office. Was appointed Postmaster in 1877 and still holds the office. The two first years after he settled on his farm buffalo were quite plenty. He killed two on his farm. Is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, A., F & A. M., Wichita Lodge No. 99.

RILEY OSBORN, farmer, Sections 5 and 6, P. O. Marshall, was born in 1824, in Casey County, Ky., his father, Elijah Osborn, having been a native of Virginia, and his mother of the former State. Mr. O. was engaged in farming in his native State, and in 1861, removed to and located in Gentry County, Mo., and upon the breaking out of the late war, entered the State Militia, in which he remained engaged upon active duty for aperiod (sic) of six months, and was subsequently called out at intervals until October, 1864, when he enlisted in Company I, Eighteenth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and after several months' active service, was taken ill, and remained in hospital at Buford, S. C., until March, 1865, when he rejoined his regiment, remaining with it until mustered out in July, 1865, and ordered to St. Louis, Mo., for final discharge. He returned to Missouri, where he continued to reside; engaged in farming until his removal to this State. In 1845, Mr. Osborn married Miss S. J. Muse, of Kentucky. Their children are - Mary E. (who is married, and a resident of Missouri), James W. (married, and residing in this township), Sarah Jane, John M. (who is married, and a resident of Morton Township), Harriet Julie, (also married, and residing in Sherman Township, where also resides her married sister Martha Kansas), Stella May (married, and residing in Union township), and Casswell R. and Dora Bell (who reside at home). Mr. Osborn is one of the first settlers of Garden Plain Township. His farm consists of 320 acres in this township, ninety acres of which are under cultivation, while he has also 160 acres in Erie Township, of which ninety-five acres are being cultivated, each farm yielding an average of corn forty-five and wheat twenty-bushels per acre while his millet yield has been exceptionally large. His orchard contains 600 peach and 100 apple trees, and the entire farm bears evidence to the industry and prosperity of its owner. Mr. Osborn has been Director of the School Board of his district, and isa (sic) member of Garfield Post, No. 25, G. A. R., located in Wichita.

THEO. OSSWEILER, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Germania, and Trustee of the township. Was born in Fliessen, Reg. Bez. Trier, Prussia, in 1847, and immigrated to this country in 1867; remained several years in Chicago, where he was employed as a clerk in a grocery store, etc.; parents reside in Kenosha, Wis. Mr. O. was married in 1874, to Miss Frances Ruehl, a native of Weisbaden, Germany. They have had five children, only two of whom survive - John (born November 22, 1874) and Mary (born July 3, 1881). Mr. O. came to Kansas in 1878, locating upon his present homestead of 240 acres, 170 of which are under cultivation, with an average grain yield of wheat fifteen and oats and corn thirty bushels per acre. Mr. O. is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and an independent Democrat in politics. He is a member of the School Board, and was Treasurer of his township in 1881, and elected Trustee in February, 1882, and returned in February, 1883.

J. S. PIPKIN, farmer, Section 28, P. O. Garden Plain, was born in Madison County, West Tenn., in 1841, his father, Lewis C. Pipkin, and his mother, Mary E. Pipkin, being natives of that State. Mr. Pipkin is descended from a race of farmers, and from his youth has followed the ancestral vocation. In 1846, he moved to Graves County, Ky., where he continued to reside until his removal to Kansas in 1876, this being his first location, purchasing his farm, which had then been slightly improved, and built his residence the same year, which was destroyed by fire the following year; but, undismayed, he at once rebuilt upon a larger scale, and now has a fine frame residence. In October, 1850, he married Miss Susan C. Dockins, of Tennessee, who has borne him five children, four of whom are now living, viz.: Henry N. (born September 3, 1852), Jonas R. (born January 7, 1855), Mary L. (December 21, 1860), Alice (January 17, 1864). In 1863, the Confederates endeavored to make him join their ranks, which he absolutely refused to do; and although being a strong Union man, was averse to becoming engaged in warfare against his friends and neighbors, and so remained neutral. His farm of 160 acres contains eighty acres under cultivation, with an average yield of wheat sixteen and corn thirty bushels per acre. He has a fine orchard of his own planting, containing 500 peach, 100 apple and a variety of other fruits. He has also 1,500 forest trees, chiefly cottonwood, box elder and mulberry. He has held the office of Treasurer of the township, having been elected in 1881; and has also been a Director of the School Board of his district; and is a member of the A., F & A. M. His farm, which is one of the best cultivated in the township, is situated upon the south side of the Medicine Lodge road, is called Fancy Farm, and by it s appearance of neatness, industry and prosperity at once strikes the eye of the traveler.

WILLIAM L. SHIVELY, farmer, Section 9, P. O. Germania, was born in 1833, in Orange County, Ind., his father, Henry B. Shively, who was a farmer and millwright, being a native of Kentucky. In early life he learned the trade of a carpenter, and 6th September, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with his company participated in the battles of Antietam, Winchester, Chancellorsville, Cedar Mountain, Gettysburg and Peach Tree Creek, and was mustered out at Atlanta, in September, 1864, when he returned to Indiana. In 1854, William Shively married Miss L. Jones, of Indiana, who bore him two children, viz., Sarah, now Mrs. L. Boler, of Missouri, and Emma Zillie, now Mrs. Emory, of Indiana. Mrs. Shively died in December, 1856, and in November, 1865, Mr. Shively married Miss Mary Humphries, his present consort who is also a native of Indiana. The issue of this marriage are, Carrie, born in 1866; Henery, 1868; Susie, 1881; and one daughter, Melissa, deceased. In 1874, Mr. Shively came to Kansas, locating upon his present homestead, where he has upwards of sixty acres under cultivation, principally in corn and wheat, a good frame residence, etc. Mr. Shively is a member of the G. A. R.

ISAAC D. STOVER, farmer, Section 36, P. O. Lamont, was born in Montgomery County, Pa., January 16, 1839, his paternal grandfather having removed there from Virginia, and is of German descent, the name having been originally written Stauffer. Mr. Stover learned the trade of a carpenter, and in June, 1863, enlisted in Company D, Thirty-first Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, for three months' service, and was mustered out at Philadelphia, sometime after the term of service had expired. December 5, 1863, he was married to Miss Elmina Kindig, daughter of Mr. Joseph Kindig, of Montgomery County, Pa. They have five children living, viz., Henry, born February 27, 1865; Joseph, October 9, 1867; William, April 12, 1873; Clara November 19, 1875, and Charles, June 16, 1881. Mr. Stover came to Kansas in 1870, locating first in Leavenworth, where he remained two years, when he removed to Attica Township, this county; and after a residence there of four years, located upon his present farm of 560 acres, 375 of which are under cultivation, 265 acres being this year in wheat, the balance in corn. He has a good frame residence and barn, and in March, 1880, erected a windmill power for the purpose of drawing water. His farm is one of the best in the township, he having successfully surmounted many obstacles and met with the usual hardships incident of the life of the pioneer settler. He has been Road Overseer and member of the School Board, in both Attica and Garden Plain Township, in the latter of which he was Clerk of the Board, whilst his family was the first which settled in what is now Attica Township.

W. H. TAYLOR, JR., farmer, Section 20, P. O. Marshall, was born in 1845, in Washington County, Ohio, to which State his father, Mr. W. H. Taylor, Sr., removed from Virginia, his native State, when a young man, and in 1857, to Henry County, Ia., where the subject of this sketch was educated, and where he, in the spring of 1864, enlisted in Company A, Forty-fifth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, for the one-hundred-days term, but eventually served five months, being mustered out at Keokuk, in September, 1864. He has a certificate of thanks, dated Washington, December 15, 1864, and signed by Ed. M. Stanton and the late President Lincoln. Upon leaving the army, Mr. Taylor returned to Iowa, where he engaged for a time in farming, subsequently engaging in the manufacture of trunks, opening a factory in Mount Pleasant, for that purpose, and at the expiration of three years disposed of his business interests, and, coming to Kansas, located upon his present farm in 1877. His farm of 160 acres, of which eighty are under cultivation, is situated upon Section 21, and is rented, while he is cultivating 280 out of 320 upon Sections 20 and 29, upon the former of which (Section 20) he has resided ever since his removal to the State, his average corn yield being thirty, with wheat eighteen bushels per acre, and millet about three tons. The farm contains an excellent peach orchard, substantial residence, barns, etc. Mr. Taylor was married in 1866, to Miss Emma J. Potter, of Ohio, who died October 11, 1880, leaving three children - Edward M., born February 20, 1867; William A., November 23, 1868, and George H., January 16, 1871. In addition to his farm in this county, Mr. Taylor has one of 240 acres in Kingman County, which is partly improved. He has been Constable of Garden Plain township, and Clerk of the School Board of his district, and is a member of the Mount Olivet Baptist Church.

[TOC] [part 20] [part 18] [Cutler's History]