KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


LYON COUNTY, Part 17

[TOC] [part 18] [part 16] [Cutler's History]

NEOSHO RAPIDS.

The village of Neosho Rapids, so called by reason of its close proximity to the Neosho River, is located in the beautiful valley of that stream, twelve miles southeast of Emporia, and fifty-four miles (air line) from Topeka.

EARLY HISTORY

Tradition states that a town site, known as Italia, was laid off where Neosho Rapids now stands, by F. R. Page, H. S. Sleeper, and G. J. Tallman, in 1855. It is needless to remark that no improvements were made at that early period. Its Italian appellation was soon after changed to Florence. In 1857 Messrs. Page, Sleeper and Tallman caused a new town site of 320 acres to be laid off, and known as Neosho Rapids. One of the first buildings erected on the town site was a two-story frame, 30x40 feet, which was built by F. R. Page and Mrs. Allen. The building was occupied as a hotel, and was completed in 1858. In this hotel were also held the first religious services in the place by Rev. Rice.

One of those uncalled for events that very frequently occur in a newly settled country, and for which, in many cases, no redress can be obtained, was the death of Mrs. Sarah Carver, in August or September, 1856. At the time of her death Mrs. Carver was only seventeen years of age, and a bride of but one year. At this time the neighborhood, with but a few exceptions, was composed of the Pro-slavery element. Late in the evening of the day of the tragedy, a party of ten or twelve men, supposed to be Free-state men from Topeka, arrived at the house of C. Carver, one and one- half miles west of where Neosho Rapids now stands, and demanded admittance. Mr. Carver and his wife having retired, Mr. Carver refused to let them in, and they commenced breaking the door down. Carver then got down his somewhat disused rifle, and, while loading it, one of the outside party thrust his revolver through one of the numerous cracks between the logs, and fired twice, both shots taking effect in the body of Mrs. Carver, who was still in bed. The shots were fatal, and her death occurred the next day. After firing the shots, the door was broken in, and ruffians ordered Carver out, but seeing they had already gone too far, their main object being plunder, they left without further violence, and went to the house of Dr. Gregg, three-fourths of a mile distant, and told him to attend the woman they had shot. During his absence the party ransacked the house, and from there went to the house of J. Connell, five miles east of Emporia, and stole nine head of horses. In anticipation of this raid many of the settlers had secreted their valuables, and it is said of one John Pierce, that he buried $1,000 in gold, and after the excitement could not remember where he had buried it, consequently did not recover it. After leaving Connell's they went to Mr. Simcock's, at Columbia, one and one-half miles southeast of Emporia. After leaving there the party came towards Emporia, and passed north. The next day they robbed the store of C. H. Whittington, at Allen postoffice, and are said to have taken $3,000 worth of goods. Leaving Allen, they passed north, and were seen no more in the country.

In 1859, P. Harvey commenced the erection of frame saw and grist mill, which was completed in 1860. Its dimensions were 40x40 feet, four stories high, and was propelled by water power. For a number of years it was operated by Harvey as a saw-mill. In 1865, a steam engine was put in use, and an addition, 25x40, built, under the firm name Harvey & Barber. In April, 1868, J. L. Simmons purchased Barber's interest, and in May, A. Robberts bought out Harvey. In 1872, another member was added to the firm. In 1875, the firm name was known as Robberts & Jones. Steam power was used until 1867, when a stone dam was built across the Neosho at a cost of $3,000. At present it is owned and operated by Messrs. Robberts and Jones. Has three run of buhrs, with a capacity of 150 bushels of wheat, 150 bushels of corn and 4,000 feet per day.

The school facilities of Neosho Rapids are good. The present school house, a two-story stone structure, 25x40 feet (about) being erected in 1871. Employs two teachers.

The Free Methodist Church was organized in February, 1876, by Rev. G. W. Smith. A frame edifice, 38x50, was erected in 1877, at a cost of $1,500. Rev. Smith remained eighteen months, and was succeeded by Rev. Jno. Garrett, one year; O. Limback, one year; L. C. Eby and B. S. Smalley, one year; S. V. Green, one year; and Rev. E. Leonardson, present pastor, from September, 1882. Present membership, 14.

Protestant Methodist Episcopal Church was organized in 1876 by Rev. J. L. Wilkins, with twelve members. Rev. Wilkins remained eighteen months, and was succeeded by Rev. Mr. Annis, two years; M. P. Grant, one year; J. L. Fordney, six months. The organization occupies the old Free Will Baptist Church, said to have been built in 1860. Present membership, 10.

Neosho Rapids Lodge, No. 2,555, K. of H., was instituted under dispensation September 14, 1818. A charter was granted November 4, 1882, with about twenty-five members. Its present officers are: J. E. McLeod, D.; F. C. Brown, V. D.; H. H. White, A. D.; W. F. Hancock, R.; W. H. McMullen, F. R.; J. Jacob, S. Regular meetings held in hall first and third Saturday evenings of each month.

Although Neosho Rapids is two miles from the nearest railroad, it is on the line of the projected K. C. & E. road, which will be built through the place during the summer of 1883. A larger increase to its general business is expected.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - JACKSON TOWNSHIP.

WILLIAM S. COOK, farmer, Section 25, Township 19, Range 12, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born December 25, 1832, near Springfield, Ohio. His parents dying when he was twelve years old he went to Lewis County, N. Y., where he was raised on a farm. Before attaining his majority he began teaching school, and taught for eight years in Indiana and Illinois. In 1875 he came to Kansas and pre-empted 160 acres of land situated on the south of the Cottonwood, three miles northwest of Neosho Rapids. He has since purchased additional land and has now 287 acres in his farm, which is well improved. His buildings are much better than the average farm buildings in the State, his fine large barn being particularly worthy of note. Mr. Cook is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, also a member of Chicago Mound Grange, No. 492, P. of H. He married Miss Margaret E. Pittman, of Parke County, Ind., April 14, 1861, by which marriage he has had nine children, of whom Ida A., Emma A., William O., Margaret and Charles Sumner are now living.

PARNELL C. COWLING, stock farmer, Section 8, P. O. Emporia, was born in Shelby County, Mo., September 19, 1847. When two and a half years old his parents removed to Madison County, Ohio, where his youth was spent. He was educated at the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, and in 1868 entered mercantile life. Was engaged in the drug business at West Jefferson, Ohio, for six years, then removed to London, Ohio, and engaged in the hardware business, which he continued until the spring of 1881 when he came to Kansas. Located in Jackson Township, Lyon County. Purchased 960 acres of grazing land and engaged in sheep and cattle raising. In the spring of 1882 he purchased about 300 acres of land adjoining his first purchase. He has improved these lands by the erection of a fine residence, large barn, sheds and other farm buildings. He has about 50 head of fine cows and heifers, about 2,200 head of Merino sheep, of which 150 are thoroughbred Spanish Merinos, and about 75 head of hogs. Of the latter he will raise principally Berkshire and Poland China. Mr. Cowling is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Emporia, also a member of Mount Vernon Commandery, No. 1, K. T., of Columbus, Ohio. He married Miss Laura E. Stutson, of West Jefferson, Ohio, November 11, 1874, and they have one child - Mabel.

DAVID A. HUNTER, farmer, Section 11, Township 19, Range 12, P. O. Emporia, was born in Mercer County, Pa., March 27, 1827. Was brought up on a farm and after attaining his majority learned the trade of a blacksmith, at which he worked in his native county until 1852 when he went to California by the Panama route. Was engaged in mining about a year, then worked at his trade there about four years. He then returned to Pennsylvania and remained until he came to Kansas, in the spring of 1858. Located in Lyon County and pre-empted 160 acres of land situated on Badger Creek in Jackson Township, about six miles east of Emporia. He has since purchased additional land, and now has 400 acres in his farm, upon which he has placed valuable improvements, including a commodious stone dwelling and necessary farm buildings and an orchard of about 350 apple trees and 100 peach trees, now bearing, besides other fruits. He has about fifty acres of timber land, 120 acres under cultivation, and uses the remainder for grazing and hay. He raises some cattle, horses and hogs, and feeds some cattle, using all his crops, which are principally corn and oats. He has resided upon his farm since his settlement with the exception of the years from 1860 to 1866, during three years of which time he was residing in Topeka, the remainder out of the State, in Pennsylvania and Colorado. Mr. Hunter is a member of the United Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican in politics and, though he has never sought office, he has been several times elected to local offices. He has never married. His younger brother, Anderson M., who is married, is connected with him in the operation of the farm.

JACOB JACOB, SR., farmer, Section 9, Township 19, Range 13, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born in Berne, Switzerland, December 24, 1815. Came to the United States with his parents in 1833, locating in Monroe County, Ohio. For several years he was engaged in coal mining, and afterwards engaged in steamboating on the Ohio River. In 1845, he removed to Johnson County, Iowa, where he remained seventeen years, most of the time engaged in farming. In 1862, he came to Kansas, locating in Jackson Township upon a farm, of 160 acres, which he had purchased the year previous. He has ever since operated this farm, to which he added, by subsequent purchase, ten acres of timber land. In 1862, he built a log cabin, which is still standing, and now used as a warehouse, and in 1871, he built a fine, large frame dwelling house, and has made other valuable improvements on the farm, including an orchard of about 275 apple trees, now bearing, about 100 trees of other fruits and 500 fine vines. He raises cattle and hogs, feeding all his crops to his own stock. Mr. Jacob is well pleased with Kansas, having come here with little, and since acquired him sufficient to assure him a season of rest, without anxiety, in his old age. He married Miss Elizabeth Roth, of Wheeling, Va., February 16, 1842, by which marriage he has had ten children, of whom John Jacob, Jr., Wilhelm, Christian, Henry, Samuel and Mary Ann Elizabeth are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob are members of the Evangelical Church.

JOHN JACOB, farmer, Section 9, Township 19, Range 13, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born at Wheeling, Va., May 3, 1843. Two years later his parents removed to Johnson County, Iowa, where they remained upon a farm until the spring of 1862, when they came to Kansas, driving through by team. The subject of this sketch remained with his father upon his farm in Jackson Township, until after marriage. During the War of the Rebellion he was engaged for about two years in freighting for the Government between Emporia and Fort Gibson, Indian Ter. After his marriage he farmed rented land for two years, then bought eighty acres of partly improved land, situated on Dry Creek, in Jackson Township. He has since purchased land adjoining, so that he now has in his farm 240 acres, upon which he has placed valuable improvements, including a good dwelling and necessary farm buildings, and an orchard of 155 trees. He raises cattle and hogs, feeding all his crops to his own stock. Mr. Jacob has been a member of the School Board, and Treasurer of the same five or six years. He married Miss Margaret J. Runnion, of Cedar County, Iowa, December 25, 1866. She died October 17, 1872, after bearing him two children, of whom Nellie E. is now living. He married Miss Martha Shafer, of Jackson Township, March 19, 1877, by whom he has one child - Harry E.

MAURICE MULCONNERY, farmer, Section 28, Township 19, Range 13, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born in the County of Tipperary, Ireland, March 12, 1826. Came to the United States in 1847, and for the next ten years he was engaged in railroad construction, principally in New York and Pennsylvania. In 1857, he settled in Jones County, Iowa, and bought a farm of 200 acres. In addition to the operation of this farm, he was for thirteen years engaged in railroad contracting, in Iowa. In the spring of 1870, he came to Kansas, locating in Jackson Township, east and adjoining the town site of Neosho Rapids. He bought at that time 800 acres of land to which he has added, by subsequent purchases, 480 acres, all of which he now farms. He has made valuable improvements upon his farm, including a fine and commodious dwelling, and necessary farm buildings. Has an orchard of about 200 fruit trees. He is largely engaged in raising cattle and hogs, feeding all his crops, which are principally corn, to his own stock. In the spring of 1882, he had a contract for one and a half miles of heavy rock work, on the Kansas City & Emporia R'y, near Neosho Rapids. He married Miss Catharine McCabe, of Galena, Ill., August 13, 1857, by which marriage he has had twelve children, of whom Michael J., John S., Annie T., Nellie A., Catharine, James P., and Margaret J. are living. Mr. and Mrs. Mulconnery are members of the Catholic Church.

MICHAEL MYERS, farmer, Section 16,, P. O. Emporia, was born in Fayette County, Pa., January 4, 1838. He removed with his parents to Iowa, in the fall of 1854. There were, in the party of immigrants, about twenty families. They were stricken with cholera at Dubuque, and went into Wisconsin, where the parents and the sister of Mr. Myers died of the dreadful disease. He remained with the larger portion of the colony, and settled in Blackhawk County, Iowa, in the spring of 1855. In the spring of 1857 he came to Kansas. In the following year her entered a claim of 120 acres of school land in Jackson Township, five miles southeast of Emporia. He has since purchased ten acres of timber land on the Neosho. He continued his farming operations until May, 1861, when he enlisted as a private in Company H, Second Regiment, Kansas Infantry, for three months, but was kept in service about seven months, when he was discharged; and again enlisted for three years, in Company A, Second Regiment, Kansas Cavalry. He was wounded at the battle of Wilson's Creek, disabling him from heavy duty for several months. He afterwards participated in all the engagements in which his company took part. He was mustered out of service at Little Rock, Ark., in May, 1865, and returned to Emporia, engaging in various business enterprises until 1873, when he married and settled upon his farm, which he has since continued to operate. His principal crop is corn; also raises cattle and hogs. He is a member of the Church of United Brethren. Married Miss Mary M. Overly, daughter of Abram Overly, an old settler and prominent citizen of Jackson Township, by which marriage he has four children - Abram O., Carrie D., Frederick E., and Viola F., all now living.

SAMUEL OGDEN, deceased, was one of the early settlers of the Neosho Valley, having located on the Neosho River, about two and a half miles northwest of the present site of Neosho Rapids, in May, 1857. He was born March 14, 1818, at Dayton, Ohio. While young his parents removed to Fountain County, Ind., where he was raised upon a farm, and resided until after his marriage. He owned and operated a farm in Fountain County, until 1850, when he sold his property in Indiana and removed to Dallas County, Iowa, where he bought a farm and engaged in farming, remaining there until he came to Kansas. Here he bought a claim of 160 acres, which he afterwards pre-empted, and subsequently purchased additional land. He owned, at the time of his death, about 250 acres, upon which he had made valuable improvements. Since his death, which occurred November 16, 1867, his widow has made additional improvements, including a commodious dwelling house, good barn, and an orchard of about 150 trees. She now operates the farm, assisted by her two youngest sons. She raises some cattle and hogs, and feeds some cattle besides. Her principal crop is corn. Mr. Ogden married Miss Susannah Lighty, of Fountain County, Ind., March 12, 1846. They had eleven children, of whom eight survived him, and seven are now living - Elvina M., Demaris J., Marquis DeL., Irving M., Frances A., Laura E., and Quincy B.

JAMES O'TOOLE, farmer, Section 33, Township 19, Range 13, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born in the County of Galway, Ireland, March 17, 1828. Came to the United States in 1839, locating in Norfolk County, Mass., where he remained until he was twenty years old, then went to California and remained two years. He then returned to Norfolk County and engaged as a farm laborer, and in carpet making until 1853, when he bought a small farm at South Dedham, which he operated until 1858, when he traded his Massachusetts property for a farm of eighty acres in Jones County, Iowa, and removed there. He soon after bought eighty acres adjoining, and farmed this land for five years. He then sold it and bought and improved farm of 240 acres in the same county. This farm he operated until 1869, when he sold it and came to Kansas. In the fall of that year he located at Lawrence, where he bought some town property and a farm of 280 acres. He put in a crop the following year, but before harvest sold the property, including the growing crop, and removed to Jackson Township. Here he bought 400 acres of unimproved land, situated southeast of and adjoining the town site of Neosho Rapids, which he began at once to improve. In 1879 he sold part of this farm, including the buildings and an orchard of twelve acres, and built upon a different location a fine farm dwelling, barn, corn-crib, sheds, etc. He has made several purchases and some sales of land since his location here, and now owns and operates a farm of 1,280 acres. He raises many cattle and hogs. Principal crops are corn and wheat. Mr. O'Toole raised upon his farm the tallest corn stalks exhibited at the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876; each of the three stalks exhibited bore two ears of corn, which were ten feet or more from the ground, the average height of the stalks being seventeen feet four inches. Mr. O'Toole now has upon his farm an orchard of 1,100 apple trees, besides other fruits. He married Miss Ellen Donohoe, of South Dedham, Mass., September 6, 1853, by which marriage he has had eleven children, of whom Thomas E., James D., John, Ellen, Henry, Annie, Michael, and Patrick are now living. Mr. and Mrs. O'Toole are members of the Catholic Church.

ANDREW J. RICHMOND, merchant, was born August 11, 1841, at Cleveland, Ohio. He attended the common schools until about sixteen years of age, when he went across the plains to Salt Lake City with a Government contractor. Shortly after his return he removed to Noble County, Ind., where he remained until December, 1861, when he enlisted as First Sergeant of Company I, Forty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteers. Was assigned to the Fifteenth Army Corps, and served in the Army of the Cumberland. Participated in the battles of Iuka and Corinth and the siege of Vicksburg. He was wounded at Vicksburg in June, 1863, and sent to the hospital at Jackson, Tenn., from which he was discharged for disability January 2, 1864. He then returned to Noble County, and a short time after, in the summer of 1864, came to Kansas. First located at Ottawa, but being still disabled by his wound he engaged in no business until the fall of 1865, when he removed to Neosho Rapids, built a store and bought a stock of drugs and groceries. Remained in business here three years, then sold out and went to the Indian Territory, where for the next three years he was engaged in trading with the Indians and in horse dealing. In 1871 he returned to Kansas and engaged in the drug business at Osage City, in which he continued about ten years. He held the office of City Marshal of Osage City one year during this time. In April, 1881, he sold his drug business and removed to Neosho Rapids. He bought the store built by him in 1865, together with the stock of goods in it, and has since continued in business here, dealing in drugs and groceries. His is the only drug store in the village. Mr. Richmond is a member of the order of A., F. & A. M. He married Miss Minnie B. Johnson, of Ottawa, February 22, 1866, by whom he has three children - Hattie E., Mattie and Guy E., all living.

ALFRED ROBERTS, miller, was born February 26, 1829, in the county of Cornwall, England, and came to the United States in July, 1845. He located Iowa County, Wis., where he was engaged in the lead mines until the fall of 1848, when he removed to Pennsylvania and remained about one year engaged in mining. The next year he passed in Western Virginia and Tennessee, and the two years following he was in the copper mining district of Lake Superior. In 1852, he went to California, where for about five and a half years he was engaged in the gold mines. The next six years he was engaged in the cattle business in California, whence he went to Nevada in 1863, taking with him about 1,200 head of cattle. He remained in that territory until September, 1866, when he sold out his cattle business and returned to California. He remained there about a year, dealing in sheep; then, after a few months passed in visiting his old home in Wisconsin, he came to Kansas. In May, 1868, he located at Neosho Rapids and bought an interest in the Neosho Rapids Mills. He has ever since been engaged in the milling business. Present style of firm is Roberts & Jones, who operate a flouring and saw-mill run by water-power secured by the fall of several feet in the Neosho River at this point. Mr. Roberts has since purchased one farm of seventy-three acres and another of seventy-five acres, both of which he rents. He has been a director of the Emporia National Bank since its organization, in 1873, and had been a director of the bank previous to that time under its State charter. He is a member of the the order of A., F. & A. M. He married Miss Mary Anna James, of Dodgeville, Wis., June 29, 1868, by which marriage he has had seven children, of whom Nellie A., Alicia B., Alfred B., James I., Mabel J. and Thomas H., are living.

EDWARD A. ROBINSON, farmer and stock dealer, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born October 20, 1852, in Lawrence County, Pa. When he was about five years old his parents removed to Grundy County, Ill., where he was raised upon a farm. He was educated in the common schools of Grundy County and at the Morris Classical Institute. In the spring of 1877 he came to Kansas, locating first at Emporia. In the fall of that year he bought 160 acres of unimproved land, situated on Plumb Creek, in Fremont Township, which he improved and resided upon four years. In the fall of 1881 he sold this farm, and in the spring of 1882 located at Neosho Rapids, where he bought a town residence and 100 acres of improved land. He farms this land is also engaged in buying and selling cattle and hogs, being the only cattle dealer in the village. He married January 27, 1880, Miss Emma Williams, who was born and then resided in Grundy County, Ill.

JOHN P. TOLFORD, merchant, was born June 25, 1850, in Orleans County, N. Y., where his early life was spent. In the spring of 1867, he came to Kansas with his parents. His father, Charles Tolford, located in Neosho Rapids, and followed farming one year upon land purchased that spring and previous. In 1868 he bought a store at Neosho Rapids, and a general stock of merchandise, and engaged in mercantile life, in which he continued until his death in March, 1880. With the exception of three years, spent partly in Michigan and partly in Georgia, the subject of this sketch has been in this State since 1868, being in partnership with his father three years previous to his death, and sole proprietor since, having purchased of the estate his late father's interest. He carries a general stock of dry goods, groceries, clothing, boots and shoes, etc. He has the largest store, and does the heaviest business in his line in the village. Mr. Tolford is a member of the Neosho Rapids Lodge, No. 2555, K. of H. He has held the office of Treasurer of Jackson Township three years. Has been a member of the School Board, and Treasurer of the same six years. He married Miss Anna Nelson, of Jackson Township, by which marriage he has one child - Charles H.

DAVID VANGUNDY, farmer, Section 24, Township 19, Range 12, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born in Ross County, Ohio, June 28, 1819. Thirteen years later his parents removed to Fountain County, Ind., where Mr. Vangundy remained until 1849, when he removed to Illinois, whence, three years later, he went to Texas, where he remained about two years. He then started for California, but, reaching Fort Gibson, Indian Ter., too late for emigration, he engaged in trading with the Indians, and in the spring of 1855 he came to Kansas. He was one of the first settlers of the Neosho Valley, locating upon that river, about two miles below the confluence of the Cottonwood River, where he took a claim of 160 acres of land, which he afterwards pre-empted, and has ever since farmed. He has made valuable improvements on this farm, including the necessary farm buildings and an orchard of 1,200 apple trees, 400 of which are bearing fruit, 500 peach trees and others of smaller fruits. He raises cattle and hogs, feeding all his crops to his own stock. During the bloody days of early Kansas a daughter of Mr. Vangundy was killed, under the following circumstances: A party of Free-state men, who were on a raid, came through this county, committing acts of robbery and rapine at different points. Arriving at the house of Christian Carver to whom she was married, they demanded admittance, but as he showed signs of resistance, and was slow in opening the door, they commenced firing through the chinks of the log cabin in which they resided. One of the charges, consisting of two small balls or buckshot, entered her side, while she was sitting up in bed, and from the effects of this wound she died three days later, on September 17, 1856. The robbers continued on their raid through the county, committing acts of violence and robbery at different points, and were never apprehended or punished. The last dying request of Mrs. Carver to her father and husband was that they refrain from seeking any revenge for her death. She expressed a readiness to die and forgiveness to her murderers. Mr. Vangundy is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church. He is also a member of the Order of A., F. & A. M., and a member of Chicago Mound Grange, P. of H., and of two temperance societies. He married Miss Isabella Taylor, of Fountain County, Ind., in 1839. She died in 1867, after bearing him nine children, of whom William Franklin, John C., Rachel, Joseph T. and Melissa are now living. He married Miss Emily M. Brown, of Indianapolis, Ind., November 23, 1871 by whom he has six children - Guy, Eli, May, Hugh, Ina, and Lee, all living.

DANIEL L. WARD, farmer, Section 35, Township 18, Range 12, P. O. Emporia, was born August 6, 1816, in Canada, near the Vermont line, and claims that State as his native State, as he was there raised. He learned the trade of millwright, and, together with farming, worked at his trade until he left the State for Ohio, where he remained six years, engaged at his trade and carpentering. The next two years he resided in Dundee, Ill., where he became acquainted with his wife, and shortly after his marriage, he went to Wisconsin. He remained in that State, engaged in millwrighting, from 1847 until he came to Kansas in July, 1857. He settled in Lyon County, pre- empting 160 acres of land, situated on Badger Creek, in Jackson Township, about six miles west and two miles north of Emporia. He was the first settler on Badger Creek, and has ever since resided upon his homestead. He has made valuable improvements upon his farm, including a substantial stone dwelling, built about ten years ago, barn, and other farm buildings. His principal crop is corn, but the greatest product of his farm is fruit. He has one of the finest orchards in the county, containing about 700 bearing apple trees, and 200 peach trees, besides grapes, raspberries, blackberries and other fruits. Mr. Ward is an ardent and outspoken Republican, and has held to the faith ever since the organization of that party. He held the office of Commissioner of Lyon County three terms of two year each. Has been a Justice of the Peace two years, and has held minor local offices. He married Miss Catherine W. Applebee of Dundee, Ill., May 17, 1847, by which marriage he has had five children, of whom Hattie, Frank, L., and Elmer E., are living.

ELISHA T. WHITE, farmer and sheep raiser, Section 33, Township 19, Range 13, P. O. Neosho Rapids, was born in Orleans County, Vt., October 28, 1848. His father, Elisha White, was a farmer and lumber dealer. When eleven years of age the subject of this sketch began work in a store in Charlestown, in his native county, and followed this occupation with intervals of attendance at school and work in his father's lumber yards until he came to Kansas. In December, 1868, he arrived at Topeka, where he remained until the spring of 1869, when his father bought a farm northwest of and adjoining the town site of Neosho Rapids, and another farm east of the village. Upon one of these farms Elisha T. remained until 1872. He then removed to Osage County, where he remained about a year, dealing in horses and cattle. He then returned to Neosho Rapids and operated one of his father's farms for about four years. He then traded for a farm situated between the Cottonwood and Neosho Rivers, which he operated two years. He then sold it and resided for the next year in the village of Neosho Rapids. Then in the spring of 1880 he removed upon a farm of 240 acres, situated southeast of and adjoining the town site, which was presented to him by his father. He has since purchased an additional 160 acres, so that he now has in his farm 400 acres. This farm is well improved, having upon it a commodious dwelling, barn, sheds and other farm buildings, and an orchard of about 1,400 apple trees, besides some of other fruits. About 125 acres of the land is under cultivation, the remainder being used for hay and grazing purposes. His principal crop is corn. He is quite extensively engaged in sheep raising, keeping from 1,200 to 1,500 sheep. He married Miss Mattie J. Semans, of Neosho Rapids, January 11, 1872, by whom he has four children - Frankie E., Laura L., Clyde O. and an infant unnamed.

WILLIAM H. WYCKOFF, farmer and grain and hay dealer and shipper, Section 26, Township 19, Range 12, P. O. Emporia, was born in Somerset County, N. J., September 20, 1850. About fifteen years later his parents removed to Fulton County, Ill., where his father engaged in farming and where the subject of this sketch remained until he came to Kansas. After attaining his majority he learned the trade of carriage and wagon making, in which, together with farming, he was engaged until the spring of 1879, when he located in Jackson Township and purchased an improved farm of 335 acres, situated half a mile south of the Neosho River and two and a half miles west of Neosho Rapids, which he has since operated. He has made additional improvements upon this farm, including an addition to the dwelling, new barn and corn cribs, and a warehouse for pressing hay and storing grain, and planted an orchard of about 100 trees. The Missouri Pacific Railway has upon his farm, through which it runs, a depot called Alda Station, from which he ships pressed hay and grain. He raises some cattle and hogs; raises some corn, but uses most of his land for hay purposes. He is a member of the Reformed Church. He married Miss Susie J. Herder, of Fairview, Fulton County, March 12, 1868, by which marriage he had two children, of whom Courtland Voorhees is living.

[TOC] [part 18] [part 16] [Cutler's History]