KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


JACKSON COUNTY, Part 9

[TOC] [part 10] [part 8] [Cutler's History]

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP.

JAMES L. ANDERSON, stock-raiser, Section 9, Township 9, Range 13, P. O. Holton, was born in Buchanan County, Mo., in 1855. In 1863 his parents moved to Kansas, settling in Atchison County. In 1869 to 1872, he attended school in Atchison City, Kan. In 1879 he came to his present location and engaged in stock-raising, and from a small beginning he now has about 250 head of cattle, and is in every way a prosperous young man.

WILLIAM G. BRADLEY, farmer, Section 4, Township 9, Range 13, P. O. Sullivan, was born in Lake County, Ohio, in 1835, and was brought up on a farm. In 1848 he rented a farm in his native county, where he remained until 1850, when he moved to La Salle County, Ill., and engaged in farming, until 1862, when he went to Perry County, Iowa, and engaged in general merchandising until 1864, when he sold out and bought a farm in Story County, where he remained until 1874, when he moved to Kansas, locating in Brown County. In 1877 he moved to his present location in Jackson County. He was married in Lake County, Ohio, in 1852, to Miss Sarah A. Glass, and has four children - Emma, Charles, Gaston, and Wallace. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the Good Templars Order.

GEORGE L. CURTIS, farmer and stock dealer, P. O. Adrian, was born in Washington County, N. Y., in 1837, and was brought up a farmer. In 1857 he left his father's farm and moved to Miami County, Ohio, where he worked as a farm hand for five years, when he bought forty acres of land, and in 1864 he went to Colorado, where he remained until 1866, when he came to Kansas, locating in Johnston County, and in 1870 moved to his present location, in Township 8, Range 13, Washington Township, Jackson County. He was married in 1867, to Miss Mary A. Carson, Johnston County, Kan., and has two children - James L., and George S. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and has held various school offices in his township.

C. H. DAY, farmer, P. O. Adrian, was born in Canton, Ohio, in 1839. In 1843 his parents moved to a farm in Franklin County, Ind., where young Day attended school and worked on a farm until 1860, when he moved to Iowa, where he remained one year, when he moved to Kansas, locating in Jackson County, and engaged in farming. He was married in Linn County, Iowa, June 20, 1862, to Miss Louisa Mercer, and has three children - Caroline E., Mary C., and George W.

JAMES D. FULLER, farmer, Section 3, Township 9, Range 13, P. O. Sullivan, was born in Detroit, Mich., in 1840, where he attended school and learned the blacksmith's trade in his father's shop. In 1857, he went to Burlington, Wis., where he worked at his trade for one year, then he went to La Crosse, Wis., where he followed his trade until 1862, when he enlisted in Company E, Eighth Wisconsin Cavalry, as farrier, but was discharged for disability in 1863, when he went to Paris, Ill., and worked at his trade until 1866, when he went to Marion County, Iowa, and engaged in farming. In 1872 he moved on to his present location, and has followed farming and blacksmithing. He was married in 1867, in Paris, Ill., to Miss Emma Norcross, and has one child - Thomas C.

AMOS HAMMON, farmer, P. O. Holton, was born in Kentucky, in 1806, and is a native of Woodford County in that State, and there he learned the wagon makers' trade which he followed until 1846, when he moved to Clay County, Mo., where he engaged in farming. In 1857 he came to Kansas, settling in Atchison County. In 1871 he moved to his present location. He was married in 1857, in Fayette County, Mo., to Miss Sarah Thompson, and has four children living - Amos, Woods, Smith, and Ellen.

J. A. WHARTON, farmer, P. O. Holton, was born in Audrain County, Mo., in 1851. In 1857, his parents moved to Brown County, Kan., where he attended school and worked on the farm until 1878, when he moved to his present location, and devoted his time to the improvement of his farm. He was married in 1878, to Miss Sarah Yates, of Brown County, Kan., and has one child - Clarence.

DOUGLAS TOWNSHIP.

A. W. BAINBRIDGE, farmer, and stock-raiser, Section 22, P. O. Meriden, Jefferson County, one of the early settlers and representative citizens of Jackson County. He is a native of Missouri, and was born a short distance from St. Louis. When five or six years of age his parents emigrated to Wisconsin, locating in Grant County, where A. W. was educated and reared. He came to Kansas in the spring of 1857, locating where he now resides, March 22. Previous to coming to Kansas he resided in Missouri five years. His father, Rev. Darius Bainbridge, of the Baptist denomination, was one of the pioneer ministers in that part, and held the first services. He contributed amply towards the building of the first schoolhouse, reserving the privilege of using the room for divine worship once a month. His death occurred in Jackson County, in 1860. He had been in the pulpit for forty-five years. Miss Harriet Warfield, a niece of the subject of this sketch, taught the first school in that part, in a claim cabin on Section 23. Mr. Bainbridge during his long sojourn has been identified by the educational interest of his district. Mr. Bainbridge has been twice married, first, in Wisconsin, to Miss Elvira Elton. By this union he has three children - Mary E., George L., Alvira. Mrs. Bainbridge's death occurred in Wisconsin. His present wife's maiden name was Rosana Aker, of Missouri. He has seven children by this marriage - Henrietta, Almeda, Alpine, Darius A., Lillie M., Effie, and Bertie.

CHARLES R. BURNS, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 13, Township 9, Range 15, P. O. Hoyt, was born in Clark County, Ind., July 6, and resided in his native State until the fall of 1863, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Douglas Township, Jackson County, where he has since resided. Mr. Burns was the Representative from the Seventy-ninth district of the Kansas Legislature, session of 1871. He has been Trustee of Douglas Township two years, and Treasurer of the same township, three years, all of which positions he filled with ability and with credit to himself and constituents. Mr. Burns was married in Daviess County, Ind., in 1851, to Miss Emily J. Hastings, a native of Indiana. They have had six children, five of whom are living, and whose names are - Frances R. married to Frank Chase, a native of N. Y., and a resident of Jackson County; Margaret A., married to John McKeage, a native of Pennsylvania; Eliza, married to Ephraim Aikens, a native of Pennsylvania; Joseph M., married to Miss Susan Maris, a native of Pennsylvania; John M., and William Sherman, who died in 1873. Mr. Burns owns a choice farm of 360 acres. It is divided into upland and bottom, is all enclosed by substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation, has eighty acres each of mowing and pasture land and thirty acres of timber land and is well supplied with water. The improvements are first-class and embrace among others an elegant residence, containing six rooms; a frame barn, 26x30 feet, corn cribs and other outbuildings. There are two young thrifty, bearing orchards on this magnificent estate, covering together about six acres, and containing 400 apple, and a number of peach and cherry trees. Mr. Burns grows from 2,000 to 2,500 bushels of corn and 400 bushels of oats yearly. Keeps from fifty to seventy stock cattle, twenty to twenty-five stock hogs, and four work horses. Mr. Burns is a prominent and prosperous farmer, an honored and representative citizen of Jackson County, and has a high standing in his county, and is respected and esteemed by all who are fortunate enough to know him.

HUGH GUTHRIE, farmer, Section 34, Township 8, Range 15, P. O. South Cedar, was born in Richland County, Ohio, in 1835, and lived in his native State until 1842, when his parents removed to LaGrange County, Ind., where Mr. Guthrie lived until September 1, 1861, when he entered the Union army as a member of Company A, Twenty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Waterloo City, Ind., and was discharged at Bridgeport, Ala., December 5, 1863, re-enlisting the same day in the same company and regiment, and was finally discharged from the United States service December 2, 1865, at Marietta, Ga. He participated in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Stone River, Liberty Gap, Chattanooga and numerous minor engagements. After his discharge he returned to his home in Indiana, where re resided until the spring of 1869, when he removed to Kansas, locating in Cedar Township, Jackson County, where he lived one year and then removed to his farm in Douglas Township, in the same county, where he has since resided. He was married in 1857, in Indiana, to Miss Susan Frederic, a native of Ohio. They have six children whose names are: Martha J., Maria, Nancy E., Isabel, Mary F. and Alice. Mr. Guthrie owns a fine upland farm of eighty acres. It is all enclosed, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with timber and water. The improvements are fair and consist among others of a comfortable dwelling, stock stable, sheds, etc. Mr. Guthrie grows 500 bushels of corn yearly, keeps twenty stock cattle, half-a-dozen hogs, and eight head of horses. He is a veteran of the last war, an honest, upright man and a good citizen and neighbor.

HON. J. W. PETTIJOHN, physician and surgeon, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 21, Township 9, Range 15, P. O. Hoyt, Jackson County. The subject of this sketch is now a resident of Jackson County, Kan. He was born in Brown County, Ohio, October 27, 1833, and is the son of William B. and E. Pettijohn, who were Virginians by birth. He was raised under the strict Presbyterian code, but belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church in which faith he was brought up, and joined in his early youth, and is still a member of the same. His father was among the early abolitionists of Southern Ohio, and as a boy, J. W. was often called upon to make a trip on the "Underground Rail Road," as it was called in that day. He has always been an advocate of reform, and has been connected with all the great leading reforms of the day. The temperance question has always received his sanction and support, from the day of the Washingtonian pledge, down along the line of temperance societies to the present day, excepting the crusade, as inaugurated a few years ago in Ohio. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and also of the Masonic fraternity, having attained the distinction in the latter as a Sir Knight. He received a common school education, and studied medicine with his uncle, A. L. Pettijohn. Matriculated in the University of Michigan, in 1855, and graduated in the Georgetown Medical College, District of Columbia. He was married November 1, 1860, to Miss Frank E. Ridings, of Hillsboro, Ohio. Her parents were also Virginians and identified with the early history of Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio. Their only son, William R. was born October 10, 1863. Dr. Pettijohn commenced the practice of medicine with Dr. Jno. Buchanan, in 1857, and continued in active practice until the spring of 1863, at which time he accepted the position of a surgeon in the United States army in the department at Washington, D. C. In the fall of the same year, by order of the Secretary of War, he went before the medical examiners then sitting in Washington City, and after a thorough examination of six days, received a commission as surgeon, and was assigned to the Nineteenth Regiment United States Infantry. Not being able for active campaign work, he was forced, after some months, to resign, and was again assigned to duty at the hospital on Arlington Heights; from thence he went to Anticosta Island, and from there to Patuxant River, remaining in the service until the spring of 1866. The war ending, he returned to his native State and engaged in the practice of his profession in the town of Lynchburg, Ohio, situated on the Miami River, forty miles east of Cincinnati. He continued in active business for twelve years, when, being admonished by failing health, he sold out, gave up a pleasant home, resigned a lucrative practice, and started West in quest of health, which he has found in the pure air of Kansas. He is now comfortably situated, enjoying the fruits of his labors, on the sunny banks of the Little Soldier, engaged in growing stock and farming and administering to the wants of the sick in his immediate neighborhood. Dr. Pettijohn was elected by the Republicans, as their Representative to the last legislature from the Forty-ninth district. He has always affiliated with that party, (it being the champion of advanced ideas and reform) but reserves to himself the right of a free thinker. His sympathies are always with the weak and oppressed.

A. A. POWERS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Hoyt, was born near Hackettstown, Warner County, N. J., May 5, 1842. His parents were both natives of New Jersey. When three years old his father died; he received a common school education in his native county. In 1856 he went to Indiana and farmed for two years. In 1861 he enlisted in the Eighth New Jersey. He was in the army of the Potomac from its organization till the battle of Petersburg and was engaged in twenty-eight important battles of the war. Returning to New Jersey he found employment on the Morris and Essex Railroad, and was afterwards agent for a wholesale house. In 1872 he came to Kansas, settling first in Reno County. In 1876 he moved to Jackson County, where he has since resided. His politics are Republican and he has been twice elected Trustee of Douglas Township.

AMELIA V. RICE, widow of David S. Rice, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 29, Township 9, Range 16, P. O. Meriden, Jefferson County. David S. Rice was born in 1828, in Scott County, Ind., where he resided until nineteen years of age. Thence he removed to Trimble County, Ky., where he was engaged in farming and where he resided for seven years. He then removed to Platte County, Mo., where resided one year. On the 9th day of April, 1855, he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Douglas Township, Jackson County, where he resided until his death, August 18, 1877. He was a consistent member of the Church of the United Brethren. He was an efficient member of the Board of School District No. 4, in Jackson County for four years. He took part in the late war during the Price Raid, as a member of the Kansas Militia, enlisting in the fall of 1864, at Leavenworth, and serving eighteen days and was discharged at Fort Leavenworth. During his life Mr. Rice was extensively engaged in feeding and dealing in live stock and managing his large farm. He also owned and operated a steam saw-mill for a number of years. He was an honorable, upright, Christian man and highly respected and esteemed in his neighborhood. Mr. Rice was married to Miss Amelia V. Pennington, a native of Garrard County, Ky., September 30, 1847, in Trimble County, Ky. They had nine children, eight of whom are living, named: William E., married to Miss Melinda Sherman, a native of Indiana; Mary W., married to William Kemp, a native of Maryland; Rachael E., married to William F. Cunningham, a native of Missouri; John Wesley; David S., married to Miss Josephine Miller, a native of Kansas, who died December 10, 1882; Amelia V., married to Thomas Hutchinson, a native of Ohio; Annie E., married to Matthew Cole, a native of Ohio; Charles Ellsworth, died December 11, 1882 and Ida J. Mrs. Rice is the owner of a farm of 316 acres lying on West Muddy Creek. The farm is under the able management of her son John Wesley, who is a thorough and practical farmer and a young man of indomitable energy and perseverance. The farm is all enclosed with substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water by wells, springs, and the creek which flows in Jackson County. It has eighty acres in timber and the same number in pasture and has good improvements, embracing a large and elegant residence containing eleven rooms, stock stables, sheds and lots, a large stone granary and handsome groves and orchards. Mrs. Rice grows 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 to 1,500 bushels of small grain, cuts 100 tons of hay yearly, keeps from sixty to seventy-five fine grade cattle, twenty-five to thirty stock hogs and a dozen head of horses and mules. The farm is noted in the neighborhood for its fertility, its fine meadows, its well sheltered and convenient stock lots and its abundant supply of pure water.

JACOB SEAL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34, P. O. Meriden, Jefferson County (sic). The spring of 1855 the subject of this sketch located on Muddy Creek, where he now resides, being one among the first in that region. He has since been a constant resident and few persons have been more closely identified with the development of Jackson County. Mr. Seal is a native of Ohio, and was born in Crawford County, January 16, 1834. When eleven years of age he came to Missouri with his parents and was there educated and reared. He has been three times married, his first two wives being dead, their names were respectively Bradshaw and Bainbridge. His present wife's maiden name was Susan Michael. By his first marriage he has two children: Theodore B. and Julia A. By the second union he has four children: William E., Mary M. C., Josiah D. and Almira D. By the latter union he has two sons: Ulysses A. and Elmer F.

D. W. STANLEY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 3, Township 9, Range 15, P. O. Hoyt, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1840, and lived in his native State until his twenty-first year, he then removed to Jefferson County, Wis., where he resided until August, 1862, when he entered the Union army as a member of Company D, Twenty-ninth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged at Madison, Wis., June 9, 1865. He participated in the battles of Port Gibson, Miss. And Champion Hills. In the last named engagements Mr. Stanley, was wounded and taken prisoner and being paroled a short time after was sent to the United States general hospital at Memphis, Tenn., where he was confined suffering from his wounds for over six months. After his recovery he rejoined his regiment at New Ibera, La., where he did duty with his regiment, taking part in the interim, in the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, and a number of minor engagements until the 9th day of June, 1865, when he was taken sick suffering from general disability, and allowed leave of absence to go to his home in Wisconsin, where he resided until the spring of 1870, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Douglas Township, Jackson County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of Holton Lodge, No. 1,769 K. of H. He has been Justice of the Peace of Douglas Township five years. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Lake mills, Jefferson Co., Wis., in 1866, to Miss Anna D. Rutherford, a native of Wisconsin. She died in 1867. They had one child, a daughter, whose name was Anna D. The second marriage took place November 2, 1868, in Lake Mills, Wisconsin, to Miss Elizabeth Philips, a native of Pennsylvania. She died September 28, 1881. They had five children three of whom are living and whose names are Dan, Frank and Willie Case. Esquire Stanley owns a large and choice upland farm of 258 acres lying on Stanley's branch of the Soldier, and enclosed by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation and is well supplied with water. The improvements are good and consist of a comfortable and cozy dwelling, stock stables, sheds and lots, corn cribs and handsome groves and orchards. Esquire Stanley devotes his attention exclusively to raising corn, hogs, cattle and fine horses. He grows from 1,000 to 1,200 bushels of corn, cuts 250 acres of hay yearly, keeps 100 choice grade cattle forty to fifty hogs and a half-a-dozen head of horses. He is an honored magistrate of his county, a veteran of the last war, a thorough and practical farmer and an honorable and upright man.

P. H. STEWARD, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 15, Township 9, Range 15, P. O. Hoyt, was born in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1833, and lived in his native State until his eight year, when his parents removed to Jasper County, Ind., where Mr. Steward resided until his twenty-first year, when he removed to Jones County, Iowa, where he lived one and a half years. In February, 1856, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Jefferson County where he resided until 1863, when he removed to his farm in Douglas Township, Jackson County, where he has resided since. He holds demit of Holton Loge, A., F. & A. M., and Meriden Lodge, A. O. U. W. Mr. Steward has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Jefferson County, May 15, 1856, being the first marriage recorded in that county, to Miss Lucinda Dunn, a native of Indiana. They had two children whose names are Columbus and Marcus. The second marriage occurred November 25, 1873, in Jackson County to Mrs. Cornelia Vennard, a native of Illinois. They have one son whose name is Walter. Mr. Steward owns a fine farm of 240 acres. It is second bottom, is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation and is well supplied with water, Steward's branch of the Little Soldier flowing through the center of the farm. The improvements are good and a young and thrifty orchard. Mr. Steward grows 1,000 bushels of corn, 500 bushels of small grain and cuts 100 acres of hay yearly. Has been quite an extensive stock man though at present is building and improving a quarter Section, which has previously been used for grass purposes. Keeps a few cattle and hogs and seven head of horses. He is an old Kansas pioneer, and was among the number that helped to defend their homes in early troubles, is a practical and thorough farmer, and honorable, upright man and is well and favorably known.

EZRA K. SWARTZ, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34, Township 8, Range 15, P. O. South Cedar, was born in Indiana in 1839, and lived in his native State until his twenty-ninth year and then removed to Champaign County, Ill., where he resided nine years, and then removed to the city of Peoria, in the same State where he lived one summer, thence removed to Kansas City where he resided about six years, and then removed to his farm in Douglas Township, Jackson County, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the McPherson Post No. 4, G. A. R. of Kansas City. Mr. Swartz participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company I, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was enlisted August 19, 1861, at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind., and was discharged at Chester, Pa., in November, 1862, for disability contracted while in the United States service, from the effects of which he suffers to-day. He was married in Putnamville, Indiana, in 1866, to Miss Amanda Mangun, a native of Maryland. They have two children whose names are Carrie and Freddie F. Mr. Swartz owns a fine upland farm of sixty acres. It is all enclosed, is in a good state of cultivation and is well supplied with water. The improvements consist in part, of a comfortable dwelling, a stock stable, sheds and lots, etc. Mr. Swartz has thirty acres in corn, five acres in oats, and fourteen acres in flax. He is a thorough and practical farmer and a brave veteran of the last war. He is a good citizen and neighbor.

J. W. WILLIAMS, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 10, Township 9, Range 16, P. O. Cope. Among the prominent men of Jackson County, who have risen to places of influence and honor, from the smallest beginnings may be classed the gentleman whose name stands at the hear of this article. Mr. Williams is the eldest son of Richard Williams, who was a native of Virginia, but removed to Ohio in an early day becoming one of the pioneer settlers of that State. The subject of this sketch was born in Belmont County, Ohio, on the 7th day of October, 1819. When ten years of age he moved with his parents to Morgan County, Ohio. His education was received in the common schools of Belmont and Morgan Counties, and one year's attendance at Marietta College. In 1856, he took a trip through the West, and on his return settled in Hocking County, Ohio, where he remained until 1858, when he came to Kansas, arriving on the site of his present home on the 7th day of April. His object in coming to Kansas was to secure land for his children and to make for himself a home in the great West. Although he has met with some misfortunes, and endured many of the hardships incident to a new country, he has, in the main, been very successful. He was the first to settle on the open prairie in his neighborhood. He now possesses a farm well improved and cultivated. Since coming to Kansas his business has been farming, and his well-tilled fields are convincing proofs of his proficiency. His political views have been in sympathy with the Republican party, since 1856, previous to which time he acted with the Democratic party. Although in no respect a professional politician, his fellow citizens recognizing his merit, have elected him to various important positions. Was elected, and served nine years as Justice of the Peace, - seven years in Ohio, and two years in Kansas. He was one of the Commissioners of Jackson County in the years 1861, 1862 and 1863, and Trustee of Douglas Township, in 1873 and 1874. Was one of the Enumerators, and took the Census of Douglas Township in 1880. In the years 1864, 1875 and 1876 he represented his county in the State Legislature. He has filled all these offices with credit to himself and to his county. He was married in 1842, in Morgan County, Ohio, to Miss Elizabeth McKeever, by whom he has had ten children, eight of whom are living whose names are: Alonzo H., married to Miss Hattie Jones, a native of Illinois; Margaret J., married to A. H. Black, a native of Ohio and a resident of Jackson County; S. Matilda, married to W. O. Brown, a native of Indiana and a resident of Jackson County; William Hollis, married to Miss Mary A. Herr, a native of Illinois; Richard A. T. W. Sherman; Mary, married to Newton Z. Fulton, a native of Ohio; and Charles Sumner. Mr. Williams participated in the war of the Rebellion during the Price raid, as Lieutetant (sic) of Company A, Fourth Kansas Militia, and was enrolled at Meriden, Jefferson County, in 1862, and was discharged in Oskaloosa in the same county in October, 1864. He took part in the battle of Little Blue. He has been a member of the Christian Church since his eighteenth year, and has led a consistent life, and is well known as an honest and upright man. Mr. Williams is to be classed among Jackson County's pioneer settlers, and as such, he has watched the development of its resources with much interest. In public improvements he is ever ready to lend a helping hand, and where donations are required for the furtherance of such improvements he is never less generous than his neighbors. During his long residence in the county he has shown himself worthy of the esteem and confidence reposed in him by his fellow citizens.

[TOC] [part 10] [part 8] [Cutler's History]