KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


JACKSON COUNTY, Part 10

[TOC] [part 9] [Cutler's History]

CEDAR TOWNSHIP.

MICHAEL BAKER, farmer, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Greenbrier County, Va., November 15, 1813. In 1833, he went to Saline County, and afterwards Platte County, Missouri, where he was engaged in selling goods and farming, remaining until 1856 when he came to Kansas with a stock of goods and started a store at the mouth of Bill's Creek. In 1858 he went to Pike's Peak and engaged in mining for two years, returning to Jackson County where he has since resided. In 1840 he was married to Miss Julia Ann Mayo; she died in 1842 leaving one son. In 1862 he was again married to Sarah Isaacs. He has always been an out-and-out Democrat.

B. H. BRADSHAW, farmer and breeder of Durham cattte (sic) and Norman horses, P. O. North Cedar, is a native of Kentucky and was born and raised in Adair County. He was born September 1, 1822. In 1840 he entered a store at Columbia as a clerk where he remained until 1845, when he went into the cattle business. In 1848 he moved to Vernon County, Missouri, and was one of the pioneers of that county, and was one of the Board of Commissioners that located the county-seat at Nevada. He took an active part in politics, and was for six years a Justice of the Peace and County Judge for four years. In 1863, owing to his Union sentiments he was compelled to leave the State with only the clothes on his back. He came to Jackson County, Kansas, and located on North Cedar Creek, where he remained until 1867, when he moved to his present location, then a piece of wild prairie. He now has 200 acres under cultivation, 100 acres being in tame grass, and devotes his time to raising blooded stock. He was married in 1843, to Miss Belinda Collins, a native of Virginia. They have eight children: Lafayette Y., Henry C., Mary E., Jasper N., Sarah U., Lucretia A., Diana J. and B. H., Jr. In the temperance movement Mr. Bradshaw has always taken an active part. While in Missouri, he was Deputy District Grand Master of the I. O. G. T. Lodge, and for two years lectured and instituted lodges. During the Grange movement he was District Deputy Grand Master, and organized and instituted all the Granges in Jackson County, Kansas. He is an active member of the Christian Church and has been an Elder in that church for the past twenty years.

J. BUCKINGHAM, farmer, Section 15, Township 7, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Platte County Missouri, in 1830. In 1864 he came to Jackson County, Kansas. In 1865 he was married to Miss Mary Hopkins, of Platte County, Missouri, and has two children, Julia and Josie. His politics have always been Republican.

JOHN BOOTH, school teacher, Section 11, Township 8, Range 15, P. O. South Cedar was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, in 1828, and lived in his native State until May, 1864, when he removed to Tama County, Iowa where he resided about five years. On the 14th day of May, 1869, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Cedar Township, Jackson County, where he has resided since. He has been Trustee of Cedar Township four terms in succession. During the greater part of the time that Mr. Booth has resided in Kansas, he has been engaged in teaching in the public schools of Jackson County. He is an able and popular teacher and educator of rare merit and thorough culture. Mr. Booth was married in the city of Topeka, May 29, 1878, to Miss Caroline Williams, a native of Ireland. She died July 5, 1881, leaving behind her a daughter whose name is Nannie Jennie Caroline.

GEORGE COLEMAN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 21, Township 8, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar. There are few sketches of the representative men of Jackson County that will be read with more interest and pleasure than that of George Coleman or "Uncle George" as he is familiarly called. He may justly be called a self-made man, being a man who by his own determination and energy has risen from a small beginning to a place of influence and honor, and who to-day commands the respect and admiration of his fellow citizens. He was born in Sussex County, England on the 27th day of November, 1815. He passed his childhood days in his native country, when, as his parents were not in affluent circumstances, his school advantages were necessarily somewhat limited; but this did not prevent him from acquiring a good, practical education, which, with his surrounds, has been of more value than any other. When nineteen years of age he came with his parents to American and settled in Upper Canada, where he remained three years. Here his father died, and as he disliked the climate and the government of Canada, the subject of this sketch determined to try his fortune in the United States. He accordingly moved to Illinois and settled about twelve miles south of Chicago, which he describes as being at that time a small village. After a residence of nineteen years in Illinois he decided to come to Kansas in order to obtain farms for his children. He came to Jackson, or as it was then called Calhoun County, in July, 1855, and took up the claim which he now occupies. He then returned to Illinois and sent out his son, and in October he moved with his family in wagons, arriving on the 20th day of October, 1856. Since that time Mr. Coleman has remained in Kansas. He has been successful in the object for which he came to Kansas. He has one of the best farms in Cedar Township, and has lived to see all his children very prosperously situated. Politically, he has always affiliated with the Democratic party. Although never an office-seeker, his fellow citizens have had such confidence in his ability and honesty that they have elevated him to various important positions, both Township and County. He was one of the County Commissioners of Jackson in the years 1860, 1873, 1874. He has been at various times elected to the office of Treasurer of Cedar Township, and has long been Treasurer of his school district. He was married in 1835 to Miss Elizabeth Voice, a native of Sussex County, England. They have seven children, five of whom are living, whose names are: Cornelius, married to Miss Sarah Renfrew, a native of Kentucky; Daniel, married to Miss Celia Sanderson, a native of Vermont; Edwin, married to Miss Mary Miller, a native of Ohio; Walter and David. As one of the earliest settlers, as an able writer in Bird's Historical Plat Book of Jackson County, (from which work most of this article has been drawn), applicably says: Mr. Coleman has taken a deep interest and pride in the growth and development of Jackson County. His life has not been tarnished by one unworthy act, and his private character has been equally blameless. He is a generous, kind-hearted man and a good neighbor, and in his declining years enjoys the love and confidence of all who know him.

W. A. DOUGLAS, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 32, Township 7, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Ritchie County, W. Va., March 8, 1841. In 1851 his parents moved to Buchanan County, Mo. In April 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Fourth Missouri Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, and took part in the engagements of Springfield, Newtonia, Humansville, Marshall, and the battle of Price's raid; in fact all the skirmishes and battles of his regiment. After an active service of three years, he was discharged at Warrensburg, Mo., April 30, 1865, when he returned to Buchanan County, Mo., and engaged in farming. He was married in Buchanan County, Mo., on February 22, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth McConnell, and has five children - Alonzo C., Joseph R., Cora B, John McC., and Winifred. In 1876 he moved to Jackson County, Kan., locating one mile north of his present location, where he lived one year, when he moved to his present location. He has 160 acres, well improved, with good building, orchard, and fences. Mr. Douglas has always taken a live interest in school matters, and he has been a member of the School Board of his district since his advent to the State.

JOHN R. DUTT, blacksmith, North Cedar, was born in Lancaster County, Pa., in 1844, where he learned the blacksmith's trade with his father, and where he worked at his trade until he removed to Jackson County, Kan., in 1877, and engaged in farming on South Cedar, for one year, moving to North Cedar, where he built a blacksmith shop, feed stable, and hotel, and has since followed that business. He was married in Lancaster County, Pa., in 1870, to Miss Emma Masterson, a daughter of John Masterson, and has six children - David, John, Samuel, Zachariah, Lizzie, and Mary. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. Lodge, at Mount Joy, Pa., and to the Order of Red Men at Renova, Pa. Is School Director of his district.

R. L. FIPPIN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 20, Township 7, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born July 10, 1826, in Washington County, Ind. He was brought up on a farm, and on reaching manhood he bought a farm near his native place, where he remained until 1836, when he moved to Morning Star, Des Moines Co., Iowa, eighteen miles northwest of Burlington, where he bought a piece of wild land and commenced to improve it, remaining on this place until 1873, when he came to Jackson County Kan., and located as above stated; that he has been prosperous his many fine improvements fully testify. He was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Rock, in 1849, at Washington County, Ind., and has six children - E. R., G. G., Nancy A., Elizabeth T., Cassa J., and Edwin B. He is member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church at North Cedar.

A. A. GATES, proprietor of cheese factory and feed-mill, was born in Lawrence County, N. Y., in 1850, and was raised on a farm. In 1871 he commenced to learn the butter and cheese business, and followed that business since. In 1881 he came to this State, and started a cheese factoryat (sic) North Cedar, and has been only moderately successful. In 1882 he added grinding machinery to his factory, and will engage in grinding feed. He was married in 1872, to Miss Frank C. Bacon, at Morrison, Ill.

R. S. GILLIES, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 33, Township 7, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, is a native of Scotland, and was born in Ayrshire, in 1823, and was raised to the life of a farmer. In 1855, he emigrated to America, and settled in Chicago, Ill., where he found employment in a machine shop. In 1861 he moved to Aurora, Ill., where he worked in the railroad machine shop until 1865, when he moved to Jackson County, Kan., locating on his present homestead, and engaged in improving it. He has ninety acres under cultivation, and good building, fences, orchards, etc. He was married in Ayreshire, Scotland, in 1840, to Miss Agnes Blair, and has three children - John, Elizabeth, and James. In 1876, he was elected County Commissioner of Jackson County, serving one term.

S. R. JONES, postmaster and dealer in general merchandise, was born in Warren County, Ohio, in 1840, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, when his parents removed to Parke County, Ind., where the family resided until August, 1855, when they settled in Kansas. The long distance from their former home, Indiana, was traveled by ox-teams. The family located near Kickapoo, Leavenworth County, where they resided nearly two years. On the 5th day of May, 1857, they moved to Cedar Township, Jackson County, where Mr. Jones has resided with the exception of four years, continuously since. Mr. Jones' family were pronounced Free-State advocates, and suffered considerably at the hands of the Pro-slavery faction, many interesting and graphic tales being related by different members of the family of these troublesome times. Mr. Jones is a member of Holton Lodge, No. 42, A., F. & A. M. He has been the accommodating and efficient postmaster of South Cedar, Jackson County, for nine years. He was married at Oak Mills, Atchison County, in 1863, to Miss Sarah J. Johnson, a native of Missouri, by whom he has had seven children, whose names are - Permelia J., Lucy N., Harriet Adeline, Nora, Ruth, Samuel R., Jr., and Albert Jesse. Mr. Jones has been engaged in the general mercantile business at South Cedar, for ten years. As he is the only merchant in the place, and is kind, genial, and courteous in his manner, he does, and is deserving of a thriving trade. He attends closely to business, is very popular in his neighborhood, and has a high social and commercial standing.

SIMON MCCRORY, farmer and stock-raiser Section 8, Township 8, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born November 12, 1845, in County Antrim, Ireland, and lived in his native country until his twelfth year, when his parents emigrated to American, locating in Gentry County, Mo., where they resided three years, and thence removed to Page County, Iowa, where the family still reside. In March, 1870, Mr. McCrory became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Cedar Township, Jackson County, where he has since lived. He is a prominent and zealous member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North Cedar. He was married in Page County, Iowa, October 13, 1870, to Miss Agnes Stevenson, a native of Ohio. They have seven children living - Maggie, Robert, Samuel, Mary, James Thomas, and William. Mr. McCrory owns a fine upland farm of ninety acres, ten acres of which is timber land. It is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation, is well supplied with water, and handsomely improved by an elegant new frame dwelling, stock stables, lots, sheds, granary, corn crib, and splendid groves, and orchards. Mr. McCrory devotes his attention to raising corn, cattle, hogs, and horses. He grows 1,000 bushels of corn, 300 bushels of small grain, keeps twenty-five choice stock cattle, twenty-five stock hogs, and six head of fine horses. Mr. McCrory is an industrious, practical and thorough farmer, a good citizen, and honorable, high-toned man. He and his amiable wife are highly pleased with this country.

JOHN HENRY MILLER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 12, Township 8, Range 15, P. O. South Cedar, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, in 1841, and lived in his native county until his fourth year, when his parents removed to Holmes County, in the same State, where Mr. Miller resided until December, 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Leavenworth County, where he lived two years, and then removed to his present farm in Cedar Township, Jackson County, where he has resided since. He was married in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1861, to Miss Sarah Combs, a native of Holmes County, Ohio. They have three children - William O. E., Mary H., and Robert Long. Mr. Miller owns a choice upland farm of 200 acres. It is all enclosed, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water and timber. The improvements are first-class, and consist of a new and comfortable cottage, a large frame barn, 40x42 feet, and other outbuildings. There is a fine young bearing orchard on the farm which covers seven acres, and contains 500 apple, and a number of pear, plum, Siberian crab, quince, and cherry trees. Mr. Miller grows from 2,500 to 3,500 bushels of corn, 2,000 bushels of small grain and cuts 100 acres of hay yearly; Keeps eighty to one hundred stock-cattle, forty to sixty stock-hogs, and 15 head of horses. He is a hard-working, practical and thorough farmer, and a prominent and prosperous citizen.

G. W. MYERS, carpenter and farmer, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1831. He learned the carpenter's trade at Steubenville, Ohio, and in 1856 he came to Kansas, and located at Leavenworth, where he worked at his trade. In 1868 he moved to his present location on the northeast quarter of Section 28, Township 7, Range 16, which he has now finely improved, although he has followed his trade the greater part of his time since his removal to his farm. Mr. Myers has been twice married, his first wife to whom he was married in 1866, being a Miss Elliott, who died in 1867. In 1870 he was married to Miss Eliza Cody, a sister of "Buffalo Bill,", (sic) and by this marriage he has four children - Nellie M., Harry C., Charles Lulo, and Roy George. Mr. Myers has always been a Republican, and in the early days of Kansas was three times driven from the territory for his "Free State principles." During the war he was a member of the Militia, and was at the engagement with Price's troops at Westport, Mo.

E. D. M. ROBERTS, postmaster at North Cedar, was born in Fayette County, Iowa., in 1858, where he was raised and attended school. In 1878 he came to North Cedar, Jackson County, Kan., and was employed as a clerk in a general store until 1881. In 1882, he was appointed postmaster, and engaged in the hardware and agricultural implement trade. May 4, 1881, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Saunders, a daughter of J. S. Saunders, of North Cedar, and has one child.

HUGH WOODBURN, farmer and stock-raiser, Sections 7 and 8, Township 3, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Ayershire, Scotland, in 1830, and lived in his native country only a short time, when his parents emigrated to America, locating in Orleans County, Vt., where the family resided three years, and thence to Livingston County, Mich., where they lived two years. Thence they moved to Rochester, N. Y., where they remained four years, and then returned to La Peer County, Mich., where they lived seven years. From there the family removed to Oakland County, in the same State, where Mr. Woodburn resided until April, 1871, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Cedar Township, Jackson County, where he has resided since. He is a prominent and consistent member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North Cedar. He was married in Wayne County, Mich., in 1856, to Miss Anna McKinney, a native of the city of Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. Woodburn owns a fine upland farm of 160 acres. It is all enclosed, is in a good state of cultivation, is well supplied with water and has first-class improvements, among others being an elegant frame residence containing seven rooms, a large corn-crib 24x24 feet, frame stable 14x24 feet, granary, handsome groves, and orchards, etc. etc. Mr. Woodburn grows 600 bushels of corn, 500 bushels of small grain, and cuts forty tons of hay yearly; keeps thirty stock-cattle, a dozen hogs and five head of horses. He is an industrious and practical farmer, a leading, useful and prosperous citizen, and has a high standing in his community.

JOSEPH WORLEY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 29, Township 8, Range 4 east, P. O. Moreno, Clay County, was born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1831, and lived in his native State twenty-four years and then moved to Davis County, Iowa, where he resided three years. On the 15 day of May, 1858, he became a resident of Kansas, locating at Valley Falls, Jefferson County, where he resided one summer and then removed to Greenwood County. Here on the 20th day of March, 1862, he entered the Union army as a member of Company I, Ninth Regiment Kansas Cavalry, enlisting at Iola, Allen County, and was discharged at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., March 20, 1865. He took part in an engagement near Little Rock, Ark., with the Seventh Texas (Confederate) Cavalry and several minor engagements. After his discharge from the army he returned to Jackson County in this State, where he resided five years and then removed to his farm in Grant Township, Clay County, where he has since lived. He is a member of Clay Centre Post, No. 88, G. A. R. He was married in 1857, in Davis County, Iowa, to Miss Rachael A. England, a native of Illinois. They have five children - Charles W., Joseph Lincoln, James C., Martha S. B., and Mary N. Mr. Worley owns a fine upland farm of 200 acres. It is mostly enclosed, is in a fair state of cultivation, is well supplied with water, and has fine improvements embracing good buildings and splendid groves and orchards. Mr. Worley devotes his attention to raising corn, hogs and fine horses. He grows 4,000 bushels of corn yearly, keeps a half-dozen milch cows, forty to fifty hogs and eight head of fine horses. Among them are the splendid young horses, "Henry Clay" and "Clyde." The former is six years old, is a dapple bay and weighs 1,600 pounds. The latter is three years old is also a dapple bay and weighs 1,300 pounds. Mr. Worley is a veteran of the late war, an honest and industrious farmer a good citizen and neighbor.

JOHN L. WRIGHT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 4, Township 8, Range 16, P. O. North Cedar, was born in Craigs, County Antrim, Ireland, in 1822, and lived in his native country until 1854, when he emigrated to America, locating in Livingston County, N. Y., where he lived until 1862, when he removed to Delaware County, Iowa, where he lived one and one-half years. He then returned to the State of New York, where he resided until April, 1865, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Johnson County, near Olathe, where he resided until 1869, when he removed to his farm in Jackson County, where he has resided since. He is an elder of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North Cedar. He was married in Waukesha, Wis., March 4, 1868, to Miss Eliza Jane Mann, a native of Craigs, County Antrim, Ireland. They have five children living, whose names are: James M., William A., John L., Mary Alice and Sarah Jane. Mr. Wright is the fortunate owner of a fine upland farm containing 281 acres. It is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation, is well supplied with water and has splendid improvements embracing a comfortable and cozy dwelling, large frame barn 36x16 feet, granary, corn cribs, stock stables and magnificent groves and orchards. Mr. Wright grows 800 bushels of corn, 400 bushels of small grain and cuts 100 tons of hay yearly; keeps forty to sixty stock-cattle, a dozen stock-hogs and nine head of fine horses. He is an industrious, practical and model farmer, a good citizen and has a high standing in his community.

STRAIGHT CREEK TOWNSHIP.

C. C. HART, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 12, Township 6, Range 16, P. O. Muscatah, was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, in 1842. In 1845 his parents moved to McHenry County, Ill., on the State-line of Wisconsin and Illinois. He received his education at the common schools and at the Walworth County Institute at Genoa Junction. On leaving school he engaged in farming near Genoa Junction. In 1868 he came to Kansas and located on his present place and has his place highly improved. He was married in December, 1867, at Genoa Junction, Wis., to Miss Emma A. Olden, and has one child, Arthur C. He has been Township Clerk for three years. Is a member of the Congregational Church.

E. C. PHILLIPI, farmer, Section 83, Township 6, Range 16, P. O. Muscotah, was born in Pennsylvania in 1845 and was raised on a farm, where he remained until 1867, coming to Kansas and locating in Jackson County one mile west and one mile north of his present location, moving to his present location a few years ago. He has 120 acres all under cultivation with good buildings, fences, etc. He was united in marriage in 1866, to Miss Catharine A. Schrack, and has four children, viz: Edmund, Samuel, Ann, Marietta. He is a member of the Methodist Church.

B. RAWLINS, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 15, Township 6, Range 16, P. O. Holton, was born in Kentucky in 1829. Early in life he was apprenticed to a hatter at Irving, Ky., and followed the hatters' trade for ten years. In 1855 he engaged in farming, and has since followed that occupation. In 1868 he came to Kansas, settling on his present location. He was married in 1856, in Kentucky, to Miss Vennetta Rawlins, and has one child - Anna.

VALENTINE WORLEY, farmer, Section 35, Township 6, Range 16, P. O. Larkin, was born in Virginia, in 1801. In 1820, he went to Tennessee, where he remained until 1835, moving to Putnam County, Ind., going to Pike county, Ill., in 1843, and 1850 to Jo Daviess County, Iowa, and in 1866 he moved to his present location in Jackson County, Kan., where he owns 300 acres of land. He was married in Carter County, Tenn., in 1827 to Miss Elizabeth Arnold, and has raised a family of nine children - James, Henry, Rebecca, Michael, John, Andrew, Jacob, David and Elizabeth. During his residence in Tennessee he raised a company of militia and was for many years the captain of the company. During the war of the Rebellion all of his sons responded to the call for volunteers and all served their term of enlistment. He, as well as his family, have been connected with the Methodist Church for some years.

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP.

ISAAC CORDON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Netawaka, was born in Cambridgeshire, England, in 1806. In 1856 he emigrated to America and settled at Princeton, N. Y., where he lived one year, when he moved to Vermont, Ill., there he engaged in farming until 1862, when he moved to Kansas, locating on his present site. He has 200 acres of land, with good fences and improvements. He has been twice married. The first marriage took place in 1826, in England, to Miss Charlotte Roberts, by whom he had six children - Charlotte, George, Robert, Isaac, Mahalia and Thedwick. His second marriage occurred in England, in 1855, to Mrs. Mary Holmes, by whom he has four children - William, Lizzie, Susie and Etta.

J. M. HARTMAN, farmer, P. O. Larkin, was born in Boone County, Mo., September 2, 1831. In 1835 his parents moved to Platte County, Mo., where he remained until 1838 when he moved to Jackson County, Kansas, but shortly afterwards returned to Missouri and then to Johnson County, Kan., where he remained one year, moving to Jackson County, settling four miles southeast of Holton. In 1867 he moved to his present place hear the Jackson and Atchison county-line. When twenty-four years of age he was married to Miss Lucinda J. Hubbard, by whom he has had ten children, nine of whom are living. In politics Mr. Hartman has always been a liberal Democrat.

PRESTON M. HUMPHREY, retired farmer, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, November 7, 1820. His father, Theron Humphrey, and his mother, whose maiden name was Harriet Miner, were both natives of Connecticut, but moved to Ohio in an early day. The subject of this sketch began life on a farm in his native county in Ohio, and there passed his boyhood days. At the age of twenty, feeling that he should begin life on his own account, he set out for the far West. He passed the winter of 1840-41 working near St. Louis. In the spring of 1841 he went to Platte County, Mo., where he engaged in farming. In 1846, during the Mexican war he was in the employ of the Government, he drove team to New Mexico, arriving at Santa Fe on August 18, 1846. He remained at Santa Fe and its vicinity nearly a year, when he returned to Platte County, Mo. In 1857 he took up the claim in Jackson County on which he now resides. In 1858 he pre-empted a claim in Johnson County, Kan. In 1859 he moved to the farm on which he now resides. Mr. Humphrey's business has always been farming, as the fine improvements on his farm fully testify. In 1881, in company with S. T. Mulligan, he engaged in general merchandising at Larkin. On June 15, 1865, he was united in marriage to Miss Drantha D. Hubbel, a native of Bradford County, Pa., and has two children - Charles P. and Hattie. He was a staunch supporter of the principles of the old Whig party till its dissolution; since that time he has been identified with the Democratic party. He held the office of Trustee of Kapioma Township, Atchison County, one term.

J. JOHNSTON, farmer, P. O. Larkin, was born in Ireland in 1838. At ten years of age his parents emigrated to America, settling in New York City, where they lived until 1853 when they moved to Michigan, locating near Jackson. In 1860 young Johnston entered a dry goods store at that place, where he remained until 1865, when he went to Linn County, Iowa, and engaged in stock-raising and farming. In 1879 he moved to Kansas and located at Valley Falls. In 1881 he moved to Larkin and engaged in general merchandising. In 1892 he sold out and is now engaged in farming and stock-raising.

R. C. SWEANEY, postmaster, Larkin, was born in Estill County, Ky., in 1817, and was raised at Brush Creek Iron Works, Green County. In 1839 he engaged in manufacturing of tobacco which he followed until 1845, when he was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Green County, Ky., which office he held until his removal to Buchanan County, Mo., in 1849. While in Kentucky he held the rank of Colonel of militia. On his removal to Missouri he engaged in farming for one year. In 1850 he bought a large flouring mill near St. Joseph, but shortly afterwards it was burned, devolving on him a considerable loss. In 1852 he bought a mill in St. Joseph. In 1855 he built a mill at Stewartsville, Mo. In 1857 he was engaged in milling at Elwood, Kan. In 1854 he took up a claim near Wathena, Kan., but shortly afterwards sold it. In 1860 he moved to Arrington, Kan., where he engaged in teaching school and farming until 1864 when he went to Montana, but returned in 1866 to Arrington, where he remained until 1874 when he went to Georgia but returned in 1875 to Larkin, Kan., where he has since resided. In 1880 he was appointed postmaster of the place. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace at various times and holds that office at present. He was married in Russell County, Ky., in 1844, to Miss Caroline McCraven, and has had fourteen children, two only are now living - Robert M. and Rosilla.

[TOC] [part 9] [Cutler's History]