KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


ERA OF PEACE, PART 21

[TOC] [part 22] [part 20] [Cutler's History]

EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS CONT'D.

=======================================================================
                 No. of 
                 Dis-      Number of Teachers Em-      Salary of Teach-
COUNTIES.        tricts.        ployed.                  ers Per Month.
                           =========================  =================
                           Male    Female      Total    Male     Female
=======================================================================
Allen........         74      34      64          98   $33 50    $26 00
Anderson.....         76      37      57          94    36 65     26 42
Atchison.....         71      57      65         122    40 00     34 00
Barbour......         31       5      17          22    30 60     19 80
Barton.......         88      24      60          84    33 12     23 71
Bourbon......         98      61      89         150    34 27     30 86
Brown........         77      62      63         125    38 20     31 63
Butler.......        143      69     103         172    30 21     25 52
Chase........         44      31      34          65    34 66     29 53
Chautauqua...         88      55      45         100    32 15     25 52
Cherokee.....        100      74      85         159    27 32     18 02
Clay.........         98      53      85         138    30 82     24 14
Cloud........        101      71      76         147    27 18     23 37
Coffey.......         80      51      76         127    35 00     28 43
Cowley.......        135      74      85         159    33 12     25 43
Crawford.....        111      60      93         153    35 75     28 75
Davis........         41      18      35          53    35 00     30 85
Decatur......         38      12      21          33    20 41     18 18
Dickinson....        112      65      68         133    36 00     31 50
Doniphan.....         67      45      51          96    42 90     29 25
Douglas......         85      32     100         132    41 48     31 23
Edwards......         21       6      19          25    35 00     25 73
Elk..........         79      48      46          94    28 75     23 10
Ellis........         39       7      25          32    44 00     26 00
Ellsworth....         68      23      59          92    26 73     19 71
Ford.........         23       5      20          25    44 65     32 40
Franklin.....         90      52      92         144    37 85     30 54
Graham.......         48       9      28          37    26 75     12 34
Greenwood....         90      36      86         122    38 13     32 12
Harper.......         43      ..      ..          ..     ...       ...
Harvey.......         67      45      50          95    36 59     31 09
Hodgeman.....         18       3      16          19    23 33     16 69
Jackson......         77      45      48          93    37 06     29 42
Jefferson....         92      54      85         139    36 47     23 98
Jewell.......        148      81     132         213    26 15     18 26
Johnson......         92      61      76         137    41 00     30 00
Kingman......         37      13      22          35    25 06     21 15
Labette......        105      64      99         163    33 90     29 50
Leavenworth..         78      55      87         142    41 00     34 00
Lincoln......         78      36      42          78    25 00     22 00
Linn.........         98      68      85         153    38 60     27 65
Lyon.........         97      62      90         152    35 72     30 70
Marion.......         81      42      54          96    36 73     32 43
Marshall.....        106      82      77         159    34 00     27 00
McPherson....        106      61      55         116    33 40     28 80
Miami........         95      57      86         143    32 36     24 36
Mitchell.....        109      46      86         132    26 60     21 26
Montgomery...        103      83      78         161    37 07     28 00
Morris.......         62      31      45          76    32 15     28 75
Nemaha.......        100      62      78         140    33 24     25 60
Neosho.......         97      58      69         127    34 20     27 44
Ness.........         40       7      19          26    18 80     15 78
Norton.......         92      18      51          69    17 50     15 90
Osage........         99      73      80         153    37 00     30 50
Osborne......        114      38      83         121    21 42     15 42
Ottawa.......         88      37      61          98    27 27     21 53
Pawnee.......         54      ..      ..          62    26 13     22 00
Phillips.....        118      34      71         105    22 75     17 75
Pottawatomie.         97      61      82         143    34 37     28 81
Pratt........         21       5      13          18    22 00     15 53
Rawlins......          7       6       5          11    20 00     14 83
Reno.........        103      44      66         110    35 35     29 00
Republic.....        106      56     108         164    30 84     25 59
Rice.........         72      34      58          92    33 33     27 54
Riley........         67      37      58          95    34 70     29 19
Rooks........         83      19      46          65    18 48     14 74
Rush.........         46      17      31          48    23 10     19 87
Russell......         62      24      40          64    20 45     15 50
Saline.......         76      40      61         101    33 75     25 40
Sedgwick.....        133      52     105         157    34 08     28 17
Shawnee......         81      54      89         143    41 33     40 95
Sheridan.....          9       2       6           8    20 00     16 75
Smith........        128      46      55         101    21 75     19 88
Stafford.....         50      19      20          39    25 27     22 34
Sumner.......        164      96      89         185    29 35     24 62
Trego........         22       8      19          27    27 37     23 61
Waubaunsee...         64      36      41          77    35 27     29 89
Washington...        121      64      83         147    32 50     26 45
Wilson.......        100      64      67         131    31 04     24 47
Woodson......         64      26      53          79    33 67     24 45
Wyandotte....         40      40      41          81    46 43     35 16
Unorganized..         10      ..      ..          ..     ...      16 66
          -------------------------------------------------------------
   Total.....      6,436   3,312   4,808       8,250  *$31 42   *$24 95
------------------------------------------------------------------Cont.
                                   *Average

====================================================== Total Bonded Assessed Valuation COUNTIES. Debt of School of All Taxable Districts, 1882. Property, 1882. ====================================================== Allen........ 16,262 $2,231,576 72 Anderson..... 15,150 2,305,267 03 Atchison..... 6,470 5,291,581 58 Barbour...... 6,614 606,259 00 Barton....... 26,477 1,537,051 68 Bourbon...... 4,300 4,324,920 60 Brown........ 21,900 3,865,843 79 Butler....... 32,366 3,605,054 97 Chase........ 18,250 1,822,930 90 Chautauqua... 16,980 1,265,154 15 Cherokee..... 43,325 3,316,241 63 Clay......... 43,362 1,985,386 09 Cloud........ 28,241 2,276,672 51 Coffey....... 27,805 2,625,363 66 Cowley....... 36,912 3,236,355 23 Crawford..... 27,081 2,635,742 99 Davis........ 3,800 1,541,388 44 Decatur...... 150 226,252 00 Dickinson.... 24,500 3,227,798 74 Doniphan..... 18,100 3,412,299 02 Douglas...... 11,200 4,303,215 87 Edwards...... 13,815 670,839 90 Elk.......... 22,203 1,369,578 54 Ellis........ 25,800 953,302 19 Ellsworth.... 33,296 1,076,154 36 Ford......... 12,776 764,769 08 Franklin..... 33,475 3,703,875 01 Graham....... 300 98,455 31 Greenwood.... 25,384 3,126,783 11 Harper....... 8,212 892,535 52 Harvey....... 34,539 2,268,898 99 Hodgeman..... 300 278,048 34 Jackson...... 16,725 2,621,165 77 Jefferson.... 20,635 3,354,429 86 Jewell....... 35,725 2,166,666 79 Johnson...... 11,400 4,000,089 02 Kingman...... 9,365 617,529 30 Labette...... 51,772 3,021,847 44 Leavenworth.. 6,666 7,122,425 69 Lincoln...... 13,272 770,462 00 Linn......... 14,625 2,999,363 61 Lyon......... 53,481 5,164,971 53 Marion....... 19,790 2,333,931 35 Marshall..... 33,800 3,209,422 69 McPherson.... 42,286 2,817,520 24 Miami........ 2,350 4,438,967 56 Mitchell..... 33,021 1,990,509 96 Montgomery... 22,955 2,745,244 09 Morris....... 24,280 1,769,479 28 Nemaha....... 22,890 3,434,025 43 Neosho....... 21,985 2,434,752 09 Ness......... 1,365 204,597 86 Norton....... 4,000 484,534 39 Osage........ 34,514 3,575,291 62 Osborne...... 17,467 1,137,906 71 Ottawa....... 19,458 1,568,228 21 Pawnee....... 27,993 1,092,869 23 Phillips..... 16,758 983,670 05 Pottawatomie. 35,840 3,854,712 05 Pratt........ 1,591 135,680 44 Rawlins...... .... 49,378 73 Reno......... 43,089 2,123,800 98 Republic..... 24,254 1,694,537 74 Rice......... 34,732 1,540,673 44 Riley........ 15,470 2,315,139 89 Rooks........ 7,120 325,150 53 Rush......... 11,071 329,301 30 Russell...... 15,369 889,225 34 Saline....... 63,845 3,094,974 37 Sedgwick..... 54,725 4,937,254 94 Shawnee...... 12,140 7,840,862 13 Sheridan..... .... 42,185 76 Smith........ 16,058 1,343,118 92 Stafford..... 2,451 344,492 00 Sumner....... 68,402 3,907,289 68 Trego........ .... 510,056 58 Waubaunsee... 5,000 2,134,962 24 Washington... 25,775 2,697,516 74 Wilson....... 15,025 2,121,418 01 Woodson...... 6,100 1,649,744 32 Wyandotte.... 30,500 3,731,005 79 Unorganized.. .... .... ----------------------------------------- Total..... $1,706,480 $186,128,138 85 ------------------------------------------------------

HIGHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING.

The higher institutions of learning in the State are: The State Agricultural College at Manhattan; the Normal School at Emporia; the state University at Lawrence, are under the fostering care and protection of the State.

STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.

This institution was permanently located by legislative enactment February 16, 1863, and its Board of Regents held their first meeting July 23, 1963, and educational work commenced September 2, 1863. Its four departments were, Agriculture, Mechanic Arts, Military Science and Tactics, Literature and Science. In the report of the Regents for 1873, they state that after they took the oath of office, April 1, 1873: "In the very outset we endeavored to obtain a clear idea of the object sought to be accomplished by the creation and maintenance of agricultural colleges." September 3, 1873, they presented the following as a basis of action:

That the object of this institution is to impart a liberal and practical education to those who desire to qualify themselves for the actual practice of agriculture, the mechanic trades or industrial arts.

Prominence shall be given to agriculture and these arts in the proportion that they are severally followed in the State of Kansas.

Prominence shall be given to the several branches of learning which relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, according to the directness and value of the relation.

Upon this system there was a course of study especially designed for farmers; one for mechanics, and a "woman's course" calculated to prepare young females to earn an honorable self-support, and likewise adorn the highest stations know to true womanly life. There were also special courses for bookkeepers, telegraph operators, printers, druggists and the several trades, instruction being somewhat shaped to meet individual cases.

The Design of Congress. - The act of Congress endowing agricultural colleges declared it to be a leading object "to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in several pursuits and professions of life."

Liberal education comprehends such as is extended beyond the practical necessities of life; practical education is considered as something capable of being turned to use or account, and at this college the design has been to so develop a system that neither should interfere with nor be overshadowed by the others, but that walking hand in hand, they should harmoniously work in a single end - the benefit of the student.

Government of the College. - By an act of the Legislature which took effect March 11, 1863, the control of the institution was vested in a Board of Regents, nine of whom should be appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate, and the Governor, Secretary of State, Superintendent of Public Instruction and the President of the College should be ex officio members. Under the regime of September, 1873, the Board of Regents proper consisted of six members, and an ex-officio member, the President of the college, who under a later dispensation is made the Secretary of the Board. The present officers of the Board of Regents are a President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and Attorney.

Board of Regents. - The Regents in September, 1873, were Nathan A. Adams, Josiah Copley, Rev. Nehemiah Green, Joseph K. Hudson, Rev. Charles Reynolds and President John A. Anderson. The successor of President Henderson is George T. Fairchild, formerly President of the Michigan Agricultural College at Lansing. The Regents succeeding those first named have been Charles A. Bates, Burton L. Kingsbury, Rev. James Lawrence, Albert H. Horton, James R. Hallowell, John H. Folks, Melville J. Salter, Stephen M. Wood, William L. Challis, E. B. Purcell, D. C. McKay, Alfred L. Redden, A. J. Hoisington, V. V. Adamson, John Elliott, F. D. Colburn, Joseph F. Ellicott, Charles E. Gifford, H. C. Kellerman, Rev. Philip Krohn, Cyrus A. Leland. The terms of Messrs. Coburn and Ellicott expire March 16, 1884; of Messrs Gifford and Krohn, March 16, 1885; of Messrs. Kellerman and Leland, March 16, 1866 (sic).

The Board of Regents was reconstructed April 1, 1883, as follows: F. D. Coburn, Kansas City, Kan., President; Charles E. Gifford, Clay Center, Vice President; Joseph T. Ellicott, Manhattan, Treasurer; H. C. Kellerman, Burlington; Rev. Philip Krohn, Atchison; Cyrus A. Leland, Eldorado; George T. Fairchild, Ex officio, Secretary; L. R. Elliott, Manhattan, Land Agent; M. L. Ward, Manhattan, Loan Commissioner.

Legislation on the Endowment Fund. - An act regulating the investment of the endowment fund was approved March 6, 1883; it reads as follows:

SECTION 1. All moneys, bonds, mortgages, promissory notes, or other evidences of indebtedness due or belonging to the endowment fund of the State Agricultural College, now in the hands of the Treasurer, Loan Agent or Land Agent of said State Agricultural College, are hereby ordered turned over to the Treasurer of the State of Kansas, on or before April 1, A. D. 1883. The officer or officers delivering such securities shall take receipts therefor in triplicate. One of said receipts shall be filed with the Auditor of State, one with the Board of Regents, and one to be retained by the officer making such payment. The Treasurer of the State shall be responsible on his official bond for all sums of money, securities, bonds, or other valuable things which may come into his hands by virtue of this act, and shall at the close of each month make to the Secretary of the Board of Regents a detailed statement of collections and disbursements, and the condition of such funds belonging to said college.

SEC. 2. The Board of Regents shall appoint a Loan Commissioner, whose duty it shall be to make investments of the funds belonging to the Agricultural College. The Board of Regents shall adopt rules and regulations under the provisions of this act, prescribing the kind and manner in which all bonds and investments shall be made by said Loan Commissioner. He shall keep an accurate account in a book kept for that purpose of all loans and investments. He shall draw his warrant upon the Treasurer of State for such sums as he may loan or invest, specifying in the warrant to whom the same is payable. The President of the college and Secretary of the Board of Regents of the Agricultural College shall approve all loans and investments made, and with the Loan Commissioner shall sign all warrants on the State Treasurer. The Loan Commissioner shall draw no warrant except for loans and investments, and separate warrants shall be drawn for each loan or investment. All loans or investments shall be made in the name of the Kansas State Agricultural College, and all principal and interest shall be payable at the office of the State Treasurer.

SEC. 3. The interest accruing on the investments of the State Agricultural College funds and the interest paid upon sales of Agriculture College lands shall be paid over to the Treasurer of the State Agricultural College by the State Treasurer upon the warrant of the President of the Board of Regents, attested by the Secretary.

SEC. 4. The Agent for the sale of State Agricultural College lands shall on or before the 5th day of each month pay over to the State Treasurer all money received by him on account of sales of said lands or collections on prior sales for the month preceding. At the time of making such payments said Land Agent shall deliver to the Auditor of the State, and also to the Secretary of the Board of Regents, a detailed statement, duly certified under his hand, showing the number of acres and descriptions of the lands sold, by whom purchased and the price per acre, and all collections on prior sales for the month upon which payments are made to the State Treasurer.

SEC. 5. Section three (3) section four (4) section nine (9) of chapter thirteen (13), session laws of 1871, and all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act, are hereby repealed.

SEC. 6. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official State paper.

On March 30, Mr. L. R. Elliott, representing the land department of the college, deposited with State Treasurer Howe, bonds, securities and cash, aggregating $93,599.05. Mr. Edward B. Purcell, a former Treasurer of the College Board, deposited $300,322, making a total deposit of the endowment fund, $393,921.05.

Students. - At the close of the school year, June 30, 1882, there were 312 students. Fifty-four counties of Kansas were represented, and thirteen other States. In the first term of the year 1882-83, 296 students have been enrolled - some forty more than in any previous year at the same date.

The Faculty as now organized is as follows, the salaries paid each being annexed:

George T. Fairchild, A. M., President, Professor of Logic and Political Economy, $2,200; Milan L. Ward, A. M., Professor of Mathematics and Engineering, $1,600; Edward M. Shelton, M. S., Professor of Practical Agriculture and Superintendent of Farm, $1,800; George H. Failyer, M. S., Professor of Chemistry and Physics, $1,400; Edwin A. Popenoe, A. M., Professor of Botany and Zoology, Superintendent of Orchards and Gardens, $1,400; Jermiah E. Platt, A. M., Professor of Elementary English and Mathematics, $1,000; Albert Todd, A. M., Lieutenant First U. S. Artillery, Professor of Military Science and Tactics - ; William H. Cowles, A. B., Instructor in English and History, $1,000; John D. Walters, Instructor in Industrial Drawing, $1,000; Ira D. Graham, Secretary, Superintendent of Telegraphy, $1,000; George F. Thompson, Superintendent of Printing, $800; Mrs. Nellie S. Kedzie, B. S., Teacher of Household Economy and Hygiene, Superintendent of Sewing, $600; Mark A. Reeve, Acting Superintendent of the Work-shops, $600; William L. Hofer, Teacher of Instrumental Music, $200.

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.

An act to establish, locate and endow a State normal school, took effect March 7, 1863. Its location, purposes and objects are stated in the follow:

SECTION 1. That there be, and is hereby, established and permanently located, at the town of Emporia, in Lyon County, a State normal school, the exclusive purpose of which shall be the instruction of persons, both male and female, in the art of teaching; and in all the various branches that pertain to a good common school education, and in the mechanic arts, and in the arts of husbandry and agricultural chemisty (sic), and in the fundamental laws of the United States, and in what regards the rights and duties of citizens: Provided, That a tract of land not less than twenty acres, adjacent to said town of Emporia, be donated and secured to the State, in fee simple, as a site for said normal school, within twelve months from the taking effect of this act.

The Legislature of 1863 granted out of lands received from the General Government through the organic act, forty eight sections of land, and that of 1869 gave an additional twelve sections, which made an aggregate of 38,400 acres, and by an act which took effect March 19, 1872, the minimum price of these lands was fixed at $5 per acre.

Organization of the School. - By an enactment of the Legislature which took effect July 1, 1864, it was provided:

The Board of Directors shall consist of nine members, six of whom shall be appointed by the Governor, and the Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer and State Superintendent of Public Instruction, shall, by virtue of their office, be members of said Board.

An enactment which took effect March 13, 1877, provided for a re-organization of the school, and for the sale of the Normal School lands. The section relating to its government reads as follows:

That the State Normal School at Emporia shall be governed by a Board of Regents, hereby created, consisting of six persons, who shall be appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Three of the Regents first appointed shall hold office for two years, and three for four years, and until their successors are appointed and qualified. All subsequent appointments shall be for four years.

Board of Regents. - The Regents whose commissions bear date March 16, 1877, are as follows: James H. Crichton, Charles D. Lawrence, Abraham Sellers, two years; M. M. Murdock, Edwin Tucker, J. J. Wright, four years. Mr. Crichton was re-appointed March 16, 1879, and on February 1, 1883, was appointed to succeed Mr. Rucker, who was re-appointed March 16, 1881, but was never confirmed by the Senate. Dexter E. Clapp and William Goss succeeded Messrs. Lawrence and Sellers. Mr. Clapp died in 1882, and he was succeeded by his widow, Mrs. Mary E. Clapp. She is succeeded by H. D. Dickson, March 16, 1883. His term expires March 16, 1887; Mr. Crichton's, March 16, 1885. William Goss is succeeded by Samuel Thauhausen, whose term expires March 16, 1887. Isaac Sharp succeeds Mr. Crichton, and his term expires March 16, 1887. M. M. Murdock was succeeded by George D. Orner, whose term commenced March 16, 1881, and he has been re-appointed by Gov. Glick, and holds till March 16, 1885. J. J. Wright was succeeded by John W. Loy, whose term of office commenced March 16, 1881; lacking a confirmation by the Senate, he has been succeeded by James Haller, whose term of office expires March, 16, 1885 (sic).

Progress of the School. - The school was opened February 15, 1865, L. B. Kellogg and H. B. Norton were the teachers. The number of pupils was eighteen. The graduating class of 1881, numbered 21; that of 1882, 44 members.

Faculty for the year 1882-1883. - A. R. Taylor, A. M., President, $1,800; George Fowler, B. A. Mathematics, $1,200; B. T. Davis, Principal Training Department, $1,200; H. E. Saddler, B. A., Natural Science, $1,200; Lillian F. Hoxie, Drawing and Penmanship, $700; Viola V. Price, Ph. B., English, $700; Susan E. Crichton, Model Department, $700; Emilie Kuhlman, Kindergarten (part time), $300; Annie M. Bissell, Assistant Preparatory Department, $350; J. T. Rees, Music (part time), $95.

===========================================
DEPARTMENTS.              1880-81
                      MALE   FEMALE  TOTAL.
-------------------------------------------

Normal.....             63       96     164
Preparatory and Model   93      109     202
Kindergarten.........  ...     ....    ....
                     ----------------------
       TOTALS........  161      205     366

===========================================
DEPARTMENTS.              1881-82
                       MALE   FEMALE  TOTAL
-------------------------------------------

Normal.....              83      117    200
Preparatory and Model..  82       85    167
Kindergarten............  5       30     35
                   ------------------------
       TOTALS......     170      232    402

The enrollment during 1881-82 represents forty-four different counties in Kansas, and eight different States.

Training Department. - This department organized from what was the "Model School," in January, 1880. IN 1883, it embraces a complete course of work in Outlines, Teaching, Professional Criticism, Methods, School Economy, Principles and Laws. This work absorbs much of the time of the students during the last or "Professional year" of each course of study.

The Model or Practice Department. - This is a complete graded school that presents the kindergarten, primary, intermediate and grammar school grades. Here children are received at three years of age and provided with a full course of study which prepares for admission to the Normal department.

[TOC] [part 22] [part 20] [Cutler's History]