KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


CRAWFORD COUNTY, Part 22

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BAKER TOWNSHIP (SANDERSON - WARREN).

B. D. SANDERSON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Parke County, Ind., March 18, 1837, and was reared to the farming industry. At the age of twenty-four, he located in Fountain County, and was for ten years engaged in engineering and milling, as also farming. After this, he engaged in farming exclusively in Warren County, when, after three years, he went to Illinois, and carried on farming in Vermillion County, for two years, coming here in the fall of 1876, where he has been actively engaged at his present industry since, meantime paying considerable attention to bee husbandry, in which he has been successful. He married in August, 1861, Miss Mary A. Ratcliffe, of Parke County, Ind. They have four sons and two daughters--Miles C., Samuel Clem, James A. Weaver, Susanna F. and Louisa A. The family are members of the Christian Church. He has worked actively in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here His farm contains 160 acres of valuable land, has good buildings, and five acres of an orchard, of a nicely-assorted variety of fruits. He has a valuable stone quarry on his farm, and a rich vein or coal underlying a goodly portion of it.

JOHN SCHNACKENBERG, farmer and stock-raiser and dealer, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1839, and came to America with his people in 1852, who settled in Missouri. He was there identified with farming till the war, when he enlisted his services in Company C, Thirteenth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry in 1861, which regiment afterward became the Fifth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry. He did active service in this till the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged as First Sergeant of his company; was wounded at the battle of Salem. After the war, he retnrned[sic] to farming in Missouri and followed it actively till 1868, when he came here and located upon his present place, which he entirely improved from a state of nature. It contains 260 acres of valuable land, is well fenced and watered and stocked; good buildings, and five acres of orchard, of a nicely-assorted variety of fruits, both large and small. He married, in 1867, Miss Ellen Rodenberg, of his native country. They have two sons and three daughters--Henry H., Cord F., Mary, Louisa and Emma. His family are members of the Lutheran church. He has worked actively in the development of the social and industrial life of this place since coming here. Has served upon the School Board of his district and been Deacon of his church. In 1881, he laid out what is known as East Pittsburg, which is very rapidly being built upon. He is also interested in an extensive brick factory with William Jestro. They do a business of 10,000 brick a day. He is also interested in the introduction and breeding of fine-bred horses and cattle and hogs.

JOSEPH SCOTT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 11, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Edgar County, Ill., in 1837, and was connected with his present industry in Cumberland County, Ill., until 1878, when he located here, and has been actively engaged at it here since. In 1863, he married Miss Sarah C. Russell, who was born and reared in Cumberland County, Ill. They have a family of six sons--Charles B., Jerome H., Robert L., Franklin, Thomas D. and Willis R. Mr. Scott is an active member of the I. O. O. F. society. He has worked actively in the social and industrial development of his locality since coming here. His farm contains eighty acres of well-improved land, well watered and stocked; good buildings, and an orchard of nicely-assorted fruits.

HOLMAN SEELY, farmer and coal mining operator, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Jackson County, Ind., February 11, 1850, and came to Kansas with his people in 1866, who settled here. He has been identified actively with his present industry here since arriving at the age of manhood. In 1871, he married Miss Sarah Daniels, who was born in Doniphan County, Kan., June 20, 1856, and reared in this county. They have two sons and two daughters--Frederick, Irena, Susie and Arthur. His farm contains 120 acres of valuable land, good buildings, and an orchard of 300 trees, of a well-assorted variety of fruits.

A. HALL SMITH, M. D., farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Montgomery County, N. Y., July 31, 1826, and received a common school education in the public schools of his nativity, his literary education in Homer and Cazenovia academies. He engaged at the study of medicine under the tuition of A. J. Dallas, M. D., President of the State Medical Society of New York. He took his first course of lectures at Geneva and second at the medical department of the State University, graduating from there in 1853. After a thorough course of study of three years, he engaged in the practice in his native State, and carried it on successfully for three years, after which he located in Seymour, Ind., and after carrying on his practice there reputably for twelve years, he came here on account of his wife's health, and has been active in the practice here since, meantime carrying on his farming business successfully. In 1857, he married Miss Charlotte Bishop, of his native place, who departed this life March 5, 1883, and is buried in the family cemetery on the homestead, leaving one son--A. Hall Smith, Jr. During the war, Dr. Smith did active service in Company H, Thirty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry in 1864 and 1865, was honorably discharged. His farm contains eighty-five aces[sic] of valuable land; has good buildings, and a nice orchard of a well-assorted variety of fruits.

L. G. STEVENS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Opolis, was born in Washington County, N. Y., April 12, 1820. At the age of twenty-three he located in Rock County, Wis., and carried on farming there for twenty-two years. In 1867, he came to Kansas and located upon the present place the following year, and has improved it from a wild prairie to its present condition. It contains 240 acres of valuable land; has good buildings, and a nice orchard. He married, in March, 1853, Miss Delia A. Holden, of his native State. They have two sons and two daughters--Herbert, Elmer E., Rosina, now Mrs. George Holden, and Hattie, now Mrs. Jacob Oertle. The family are members of the Baptist Church.

ALBERT STOTTS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Perry County, Ohio, March 28, 1851, and settled in this county with his people in 1868, and has been actively engaged at farming business here since, in the meantime working at coal mining. On August 4, 18981, he married Miss Loretta Dosser, who was born in this county December 10, 1859, her people having located in Kansas at an early day. The remainder of the Dosser family are--Francis, Mary, Loretta, Terrace (married to Isaiah Stotts, brother of the above, January 1, 1883), Emma. The parents are both dead. Mr. Stotts' residence (the Dosser homestead) contains 120 acres of valuables[sic] land, containing good buildings, and about 700 fruit trees, of a well-assorted variety, and he has, besides, 160 acres adjoining, of valuable land for grain tillage, and underlaid with coal in good paying quantities.

C. H. STRONG, M. D., proprietor Heritage Farm, farmer and stock-raiser and teacher, present principal of district School No. 47, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Girard, Erie Co., Penn., in 1830, and received his rudimentary education in public schools of his nativity, and his literary education in "Girard College," Penn., graduating from that institution in a full literary course of instruction at the age of twenty-four years. He then turned his attention to the study of medicine, under the tuition of J. P. Bishop, Dean of the faculty of medicine in the Cleveland Eclectic Medical College, at Cleveland, Ohio, and after a thorough course of private study of three years, he entered into a full course of lectures at the Cincinnati Medical College, graduating from there in 1858. He then engaged in the practice of his profession in Sangamon County, Ill., with which he was reputably connected for eight years, after which he came to Kansas, 1866, and located in this county and has been actively identified with his present industries. He married in March, 1861, Miss Fannie Fowler, who was born and reared in Sangamon County, Ill. They have one son living--George W., and have buried the only daughter, Millicent J., in Sangamon County, Ill. His wife is an active member of the Presbyterian Church, and a regular communicant. Since locating here Dr. Strong has always worked actively in the development of all measures tending to the growth and prosperity of the social and industrial life of Crawford County. Was first County Superintendent of Public Instruction, which incumbency he held for two consecutive terms; filled the incumbency of District Clerk during same terms, and was deputy of three other county offices during this time, since which time he has been an active official almost continuously in municipal or school official positions. His farm contains 160 acres of valuable land, two mile north of Pittsburg, well watered and timbered and stocked, good buildings and an orchard of a well-assorted variety of both large and small fruits; pays attention to breeding of Berkshire hogs, and Devonshire and Kentucky Clay cattle. Upon his farm he has a beautiful lake, "Siloam," containing all varieties of native fish, and the "Jeannette," a craft of the invention of the Doctor's fertile mind. Upon and underlying his farm is a rich vein of coal "prospected" only in a few places as yet. The Doctor has besides his farm residence, some very valuable town lots and buildings both in the cities of Pittsburg and Girard. His industry has also had the attention of economy.

LUTHER T. THAYER, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Litchfield, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., January 30, 1836, and was identified there latterly for five years with wholesale merchandising in the traveling business. In 1851, he located in Marshall County, Ind., and carried on farming and lumber business there for many years. He afterward spent two years in Porter County in farming business. In 1868, he went to Clayton County, Iowa, and after two years of active business life there, he came to Kansas and eventually located here, where he has been actively identified with his present industry since. In June, 1851, he married Miss Susan M. Green, in Marshall County, Ind. She was born in Rush County, Ind., April 22, 1836, and reared in Marshall County. They have three sons and four daughters living--Horatio G., Littie E., now Mrs. W. F. Gaskill; Ida M., now Mrs. E . A. Eyestone; Martin D., Lueila Maud, Frank Herbert and Lena Rivers, and have buried one daughter, Esther Ann, Mrs. Shawger, in Pittsburg Cemetery. His farm contains eighty acres of improved land, good buildings and a nice young orchard.

JOHN T. UNROE, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, September 16, 1826, and was reared and educated there. He left his farm in 1854, and located in Greene County, Ill., carried on farming there until 1869; located in Jasper County, Mo., and carried on farming until 1878. Then he came to Kansas and engaged in merchandising at Galena, retiring from that after a year and engaging at his present industry here. In 1845, he married Miss Sarah Eliza Clark, of his native place. They have a family of two sons and six dahghters[sic]--Mary Elizabeth, now Mrs. Samuel G. Miller, of Marion County, Kan.; Martha Jane, now Mrs. Robert W. Hight, of Macon County, Ill.; Constantia Woodworth, now Mrs. James A. Dawson, of Girard, Kan.; James Buchana, farmer and stock-raiser, of Macon County, Ill; Eliza Virginia, now Mrs. Austin M. Phillips, of Barton County, Mo.; Lucia A., now Mrs. Dr. M. E. Johnston, of Preston, Mo.; Rhoda Ann and George. Mr. Unroe has worked actively in the development of social life of the locality since coming here. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is an active member of the A., F. & A. M. Society. His farm contains 160 acres of improved land, good buildings and an orchard of a nicely assorted variety of trees. He pays especial attention to stock-raising.

ALBERT S. WARREN, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. New Pittsburg, was born in Steuben, Oneida Co., N. Y., October 10, 1820. In 1836, he removed with his people, who settled in Adrian, Mic., where he was identified with farming for many years. In 1858, he removed to Newton County, Ind., where he carried on his farming business for eleven years, being also actively engaged in merchandising and milling. He then went to Dakota, when, after a year, he came here and located upon his present place, which he has improved from a wild prairie to its present condition, containing 240 acres of valuable land, well fenced and watered and stocked, good buildings and an orchard of 800 trees, of a nicely assorted variety of fruits. He married in Tecumseh, Mich., in 1845, Miss Clarissa Goodrich, who was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N. Y., March 5, 1834, and was reared and educated in Michigan. They have one son and a daughter--George Goodrich and Nina Clara, now Mrs. Oscar Moorman, of Pittsburg. During the war he was Home Provost Marshal of his district and the military enrolling commissioner. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He has served upon the School Board of his district here for thirteen consecutive years. He was instrumental in building the first mill here, assisted by Mr. Bruner, present proprietor. In 1881, he laid out what is now known as Warren's Addition to Pittsburg. He owns the Warren Coal Shaft and has been very active in operating in real estate and livestock transactions, of which Mr. Warren has made a great success.

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