KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY, Part 6

[TOC] [part 7] [part 5] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. (DONELSON - TABLER)

E. M. DONELSON, M. D., was born at Maysville, Mason Co., Ky., in 1847. In 1857, his parents emigrated to Indiana, living in Shelby County, where he remained until 1864. He enlisted in the Seventy-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving a short time. In 1865, he began reading medicine, devoting his time to this and teaching. In 1867, he emigrated to Kansas with his father, Col. Samuel Donelson, locating in Crawford County, where they engaged in the stock business. In 1868, they moved their business to Labette County, remaining there until the spring of 1870; then came into Howard County, as they supposed, and again engaged in the stock business, but which proved to be in the Indian Territory when the survey was made. In the fall 1870, the subject of this sketch returned to Labette County, and resumed the study of medicine remaining there two years, and in the winter of 1874-75 finished his course, and was graduated at the medical department of the University of Louisville, Ky. He then returned to Kansas, locating at Elgin, where he engaged in the practice of his profession, remaining there until spring of 1882; thence to Cedar Vale, and resumed the practice of medicine. In the spring of 1883, he formed a partnership with Dr. Smith, and they put in a fine stock of drugs, and have worked up a large trade aside from the extensive practice they have attained. The Doctor is one of the progressive men who are a help to any town which they locate in, is pleasant and courteous, and has a host of friends.

C. W. FOSTER, farmer, P. O. Wauneta, was born in Indiana in 1833. Was raised in Marion County, and lived there until 1865, going from there Missouri, and remained there until 1868; thence to Arkansas. At the end of three years he came to Kansas, and located a claim on Section 13, Town 33, Range 9. It was then seventy-five miles to a railroad, and there were no improvements to speak of. Mr. Foster has a fine farm of 240 acres -- 130 acres in cultivation -- the entire place fenced; a fine orchard of four acres and two and one-half miles of hedge. Is one of the best farms in the township, and has the place stocked with 100 head of cattle. In 1855, was married in Marion County, Ill., to Miss Blackburn. She died in 1857, and he was married again in 1865 to Miss Mabery, of Marion County. They have nine children -- John W., David M., Vesula M., Jasper N., Lucy, Lillie, Edgar, Nettie and Angeline. Mr. Foster is a member of the Christian Church.

C. E. GURNSEY, stock-raiser, P. O. Cloverdale, was born in Michigan in 1849, where he lived until 1863; thence to Decatur County, Iowa, where he remained until 1870, coming from there to Kansas, locating in Howard County, and took a claim. It was 120 miles to a railroad point, and there were but few settlers. He improved his claim and lived there for ten years; he then traded for a farm on Section 11 and 12, Township 33, Range 8, on the Big Caney River, and proceeded to make a stock farm of it. His place contains 800 acres, with forty-eight acres of timber, and all conveniences for stock-raising; 640 acres are inclosed by fence, 200 acres in cultivation, and good house, and orchard of two and one-half acres; and has the place stocked with forty cows. Besides this, he owns one-half interest in 250 head of fat cattle, and will make it a point to fatten that number or more each season. The subject of this sketch came to Kansas without anything to make a start, and has made a good success. In 1876, he was married to Miss Mary Spears, of Cloverdale. They have four children, viz.; Mary, Evert, Estella and Herman.

COL., F. M. HILLS, merchant, was born in Connecticut in 1829. When twelve years of age, he went to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1847, when he enlisted in the Second Pennsylvania Infantry, and went into the Mexican war, serving one year; and was at the capture of the City of Mexico, and several other battles. In 1861, he volunteered in the Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, and was commissioned Captain in command of Company I. In the spring of 1863, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment, and took command of the same, and served three years. He was in the following heavy battles: South Mountain, Antietam, Vicksburg, Jackson, Fredericksburg, the Battle of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor and several other engagements. After coming out of the army, he located at Titusville, Pa., and engaged in the tobacco trade, remaining there until 1874. Emigrating from there to Kansas he located Chautauqua County, where he engaged in farming. In 1878, he engaged in the hardware and furniture business at Cedar Vale, in which he has built up a large trade; also carries a stock of lumber, etc. His trade has more than doubled, and he has enlarged his building more than one-half to accommodate his increasing trade. He was married in 1860 at Titusville, Penn., to Miss Annie Proper. They have six children -- Josephine G., Daisy E., Minnie A., Grace H., Gilbert P. and Albert. He is a member of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, Grand Army of the Republic.

A. HOLVERSON, farmer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Norway in 1825. In 1839, he emigrated to America, locating at Beloit, Wis., and engaged in farming, remaining there until 1869; emigrating from there to Kansas, locating in Howard County (now Chautauqua), and located a claim on Section I, Township 34, Range 8. The survey had not been made, and the land belonged to the Indians, and for two years he paid a rent or tax of $5 for the use of the land. There were but few settlers in the county at the time, and the nearest neighbor on the north was thirty miles distant, and the nearest railroad was 175 miles, and nothing in the shape of supplies could be had nearer than Eureka, eighty miles distant, and for a time this was the nearest post office. Mr. Holverson has a fine farm on the Caney River bottoms, with plenty of timber and water; has 100 acres under cultivation, with good fences, hedges and orchard, large stone residence, good barns and sheds; and the place is well stocked with 125 head of cattle, 30 hogs, 1,000 sheep and 10 horses. He also own 160 acres of land near his farm, and is one of the most successful farmers on the river. He is a man highly respected, and a good citizen. He was married in 1845, at Beloit, Wis., to Miss G. Gordon. They have eight children -- Holver, Thomas, Oley, Caroline, Nellie, Rebecca, Hannah and Henry. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.

O. HOLVERSON, farmer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Beloit, Wis., in 1848, and lived there with his parents and 1869, when he emigrated to Kansas with his father, locating in Howard County (now Chautauqua ), locating a claim on the Big Caney River, and is now the oldest settler on the river except his father. The land then belonged to the Indians. The country abounded in gam of all kinds. The nearest railroad point was 175 miles distant, and he went about 100 miles for supplies. His claim is on Sections 1 and 2, Township 34, Range 8, consisting of 160 acres of fine valley land, which is watered by the Big Caney River, with an abundance of timber along its banks. He has improved the place by fencing, planting hedges, and a fine orchard. Ninety acres of land are cultivated. He has built a fine residence, and other farm buildings. This place is one of the finest in the county, and is desirably located for stock-raising, which business Mr. Holverson has been engaged in for some time, having stocked the place with fifty head of cattle, and sixty head of hogs, and good horses. He is about three-fourths of a mile from the city of Cedar Vale, and hence has a very valuable farm. The subject of this sketch is one of the most enterprising men of the county, and has accumulated a nice property through his attention to business, starting, as he did, without any capital. In 1880, he was married to Miss Frances Schatz of Canada. They have one son -- George.

HENRY JOHNSON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Wauneta, was born in Madison County, Iowa, in 1845, where he lived until nine years of age; thence to Texas, and was there nearly two years; thence to Arkansas; at the end of one year located at Kansas City, Mo. In 1858, located at Lawrence, Kan., and was there but a short time when he took a trip to the Western Territories, and during the war was employed as a scout through the mountains and on the plains. At the close of the war, he returned to Douglas County, Kan., and engaged in farming. In the spring of 1869, he settled in Howard County (now Chautauqua), locating on Grant Creek, and took a claim on Section 27, Township 34, Range 9. The county was not organized, and the survey was not made; there were no improvements on the Creek, and there were plenty of Indians; the distance to the nearest railroad point was 175 miles, and it was sixty miles to a post office. Mr. Johnson has 220 acres of land, with sixty acres in cultivation, the entire place fenced, three acres of orchard, the place watered by several nice springs, and on the whole has a good farm for stock-raising. He raises from twenty-five to thirty head of cattle, besides buying and selling and feeding other stock. He has been very successful in his business, and is noted as one of the enterprising men of his township. He was married in 1864, at Clinton, Kan., to Miss Sarah E. Betts. They have six children, viz.: Mary E., John A., Isaac H., Henry E., Chester A. A. He is a member of the Masonic order.

WILLIAM KELLEY, contractor and builder, was born in West Troy, N.Y., in 1849. When five years of age, he went to Ohio and lived there until 1864, and at the age of fourteen years enlisted in the Fourth Ohio Veteran Cavalry, serving until July, 1865. Mr. Kelley was one of the very youngest men who served in the army as a volunteer. He was in Sherman's army, and on the raid through Georgia; in December, 1865, enlisted in the Eighteenth United States Regulars, and served three years on the plains. After receiving his discharge, he was on the Union Pacific Railroad for a time; thence to Council Grove, Kan., and learned the stone-mason's trade, remaining there nearly three years, after which he worked at bridge building on the M. K. & T. R. R. and the Carthage & N. W. R. R. in Missouri; thence to the Osage Mission, at work on the buildings there. In 1874, he came to Howard County, and after remaining at Peru for a short time he located at Cedar Vale, and commenced contracting and building. In 1876, he went to the Black Hills, and was there about twenty months when he returned to Cedar Vale, and bought a farm of 200 acres joining the town site, which is all in cultivation, with three residences; also owns a farm of eighty acres in Jefferson Township. He is still engaged in contracting and building, and is a good workman and a thorough business man. He was married in 1878 to Miss Helen C. Holverson, of Cedar Vale. They have three children -- Edward, Ella, Helen. He is a member of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, Grand Army of the Republic, and of the K. of H.

THOMAS C. LEONARD, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Wauneta, was born in Owen County, Ind., in 1844. In 1863, he enlisted in the Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving three years and four months. He was in the Army of the Potomac, and was at the battles of Gettysburg, South Mountain and Fredericksburg; and received a wound at the battle of Gettysburg. After coming out of the army he located in Putnam County, Ind., where he remained until the fall of 1869; emigrating from there to Kansas, locating in Howard County (now Chautauqua); he located a claim on Section 3, Township 34, Range 9, on what is known as Grant Creek. He is the oldest settler on the creek, and when his claim was made the treaty had not been ratified, and the land virtually belonged to the Indians, and these were camped along the banks in considerable numbers. It was 150 miles to the nearest railroad point, and sixty miles to a post office. Mr. Leonard has a fine stock farm of 280 acres, with an abundance of water; 200 acres are fenced, 50 acres of timber, and 120 are under cultivation. He has a good orchard, hedges and buildings, and for some time has been engaged in the stock business. He has sixty head of hogs, seventy head of cattle, and has done a fine business in stock; and through industry and close attention to business has made considerable property with nothing to start with except determination. He was married in 1871 to Miss Sarah Hooper, of Owen County, Ind. They have four children -- Cora, Estella, Rollie and Adolphus. He is a member of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, Grand Army of the Republic, and of Sheldon Lodge, No. 1,987, K. of P.

H. W. LOOMIS, farmer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Hampshire County, Mass., 1830, where he was raised and lived until 1865; was a carpenter by trade, and followed that business. From Massachusetts he migrated to Des Moines, Iowa, and remained there two years; thence to Washington County, Mo., and was there four years. In 1871, he settled in Kansas, locating in Howard County, taking a claim in Section 30, Town 33, Range 9; it was seventy-five miles to a railroad point, and there were but five settlers in the county. Mr. Loomis has a fine farm of 240 acres, with thirty-five acres in cultivation, fifty acres fenced, a good orchard and buildings, and, besides this, has improved a farm of 100 acres, and has done some work at carpentering and building. For a number of years, has been quite extensively engaged in stock-raising, handling from 100 to 150 head annually. Mr. Loomis is a public-spirited man and takes a lively interest in all public matters; has served two terms as Trustee and Assessor of his township. Was married, 1866, at Des Moines, Iowa, to Miss Amanda Constant; they have one son, William E.

W. P. LYNCH, attorney at law, was born in Lancaster County, Penn., in 1839, where he lived until 1843, thence to Perry County, where he remained until sixteen years of age, thence to Cumberland County. In 1862, he enlisted in Company A, the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until June, 1863. In 1870, he went to Philadelphia, Penn., and after remaining a short time, emigrated to Kansas, settling in Oswego; the following spring, he came to Howard County and located a claim in Jefferson Township, eighty miles from a railroad; the county was organized. He was a delegate for his township when the Republican party of the county was organized, and was elected the first Justice of his township, and took an active part in organizing the Republican party. After remaining on his place one year, he sold out and located at Cedar Vale, and was appointed Postmaster, and engaged in real estate and finished a law course to which he had devoted some time previous to this. In 1876, he was admitted to the bar, and since then has been practicing law. In 1873, he married Miss Laura A. Armstrong, of Howard County; they have four children living -- Clarence W., Albert W., Edwin H. and John C. He is a member of the Masonic order, of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, G. A. R. and of the K. of H.

JAMES R. MARSH, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Fulton County, N. Y., 1844. In 1860, his parents migrated to Illinois, locating in Bureau County. In 1861, enlisted in the Sixty-fifth Illinois Infantry, Company E, serving until the close of the war; was captured once, and received a wound at the battle of Lost Mountain, near Atlanta, in 1864. After coming out of the army, remained one year in Bureau County, and was married to Miss Mary Jones, of that county. In 1866, he migrated to Kansas, locating near Emporia, and engaged in farming and teaching, and took a course at the State Normal School. In 1869, he started South and got lost and came to a creek which proved to be the Big Caney River, and being pleased with the country, was satisfied it was the place to start a town, and picked out a claim; but when he had gone some fifty miles on his road home, felt dissatisfied, and returned and took the claim of the present town site of Cedar Vale. He at once returned with his family, located another claim, and a man by the name of Acres deeded the claim for the town site of Cedar Vale, Mr. Marsh having helped to organize a town company, and being a member of the same; he then opened a store, putting in the first stock of goods in the town. In the spring of 1870, he succeeded in getting a post office established there, and was appointed the first Postmaster at a salary of $12 per year. Mr. Marsh also put up the first frame business house, a building 30x60 feet; the first stock of goods was put into a log cabin. In 1871, he closed out his stock of goods and began working for a mill, and in 1872, succeeded in getting some parties in there with a mill; he becoming responsible for a part of the indebtedness. The following year, he closed out his interests in the town and engaged in farming, his farm consisting of 400 acres, one mile from the town; of this, he has 100 acres in cultivation, has the place nearly inclosed with fences, has five acres of orchard; erected good buildings and has an abundance of water, ninety acres of timber, and has the place stocked with 25 head of horses, 100 head of hogs and about 100 head of cattle, and has made it win merely through attention to business and enterprise. He is one of the most public-spirited men in the county, and is highly respected by all. When he made the settlement, there were but two or three families in the township and it was 150 miles from a railroad, not much to encourage a man to settle, and was considerably worse off than nothing. Mr. and Mrs. Marsh have three children, viz.: Robert, Orris and Locen. Mr. Marsh is a member of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, G. A. R., and of the I. O. O. F. He also served as President of the Settlers' Protective Association, which was organized by the men and officers in the county to settle disputes and claims.

CHARLES R. POLLARD, Postmaster, was born in Suffolk County, England, in 1824, living there until twenty years of age, thence, for a time, was in different parts of England until 1854, when he emigrated to America, and, for one year, was at Beaver Penn., going from there to McHenry County, Ill., and remained there one year, thence to Dade County, Mo. In 1858, he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Osage County, where he located a claim, and was there until 1868; going from there to Eureka, Greenwood County, where he built the grist, saw and flouring mill, and was in this business three years; he then sold his property, and purchased a portable saw mill, which he moved into Howard (now Chautauqua) County, and took a claim on the Big Caney River, near Cedar Vale, and here he set up the mill and for three years was engaged in lumbering. After remaining on his place five years, he sold out and, in May, 1877, was appointed Postmaster at Cedar Vale. Mr. Pollard also owns a farm of 200 acres in Cowley County. In 1876, he was married to Mrs. Samantha Z. Kew, of Moulton, Iowa. While in Osage County, he served as Deputy Sheriff for seven years.

P. H. SKAVLEN, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Rock County, Wis., May 25, 1845, living there until 1864, when he enlisted in the Forty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, serving until June, 1865. After coming out of the army, he returned to Wisconsin, and soon after went to Minnesota, locating at Rochester, where he remained until 1869; thence back to Wisconsin, and, in the spring of 1870, emigrated to Kansas; arrived on Big Caney River (then called the Osage Diminished Reserve) March 2, 1870; located a claim March 11, which turned out to be Section 11, Town 34, Range 8 east, Howard County, which was changed to Chautauqua, and but five settlers were in the county; the county was not organized and the survey was not completed; it was 120 miles to a railroad. When the town of Cedar Vale was laid out, it took two acres off his claim. He has 158 acres of choice land, eighty-five under cultivation, and the entire place is fenced; he has some fine hedge, a good orchard and twenty-five acres of timber, a good frame house 14x26 feet, wing 16x18 feet. Mr. Skavien has been engaged in raising, feeding and buying stock for a number of years, and has been very successful. He also put up a store building in the village and was in trade about three years. He was married, on November 20, 1872, at Beloit, Wis., to Miss Martha Ereksen, of Dodge County, Minn; they have two children -- Walter P. and Norlen Odeen. His is a member of Cedar Vale Post, No. 99, G.A.R.

MAJ. J. M. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Culpepper County, Va., 1819; when quite young, his parents migrated to Ohio, locating in Logan County, where he remained until 1846; he then went into the Mexican war as Major of the Second Ohio Regiment, Serving eighteen months, and was in the battle of Buena Vista and at the capture of the City of Mexico, besides many other small battles. After coming out of the army, he returned to Logan County, Ohio, where he remained until 1851, and from that time until 1856, was in Atchison County, Mo.; thence to Iowa, for two years, and, in 1858, returned to Missouri, locating at Independence; from there to Texas, and, in 1860, locating in Jefferson, Kan., where he built a flouring mill, remaining there five years; thence to Medina, and, moving his mill to that point and adding a carding mill, he had the misfortune to lose his property by fire, and, until 1870, was engaged in building and superintending several mills; when he came to Howard County (now Chautauqua ) to put up a mill, and, being pleased with the country, located a claim on Section 5, Town 33, Range 9; it was some 120 miles from a railroad, and there were but few settlers in the township. He has a farm of 160 acres, seventy of which are in cultivation, good fences, orchard, etc.; and this is to some extent engaged in dairying. In 1840, he was married to Miss Jennie Soddith, of Logan County, Ohio; she died in 1859 in Texas, leaving three children, Dulcena, Milard F. and Jessie F. In 1863, Mr. Smith was married to Mrs. Melissa E. Atkins. They have one child, William I.

WILLIAM THOMPSON, farmer, P. O. Cedar Vale, was born in Washington County, Ind., in 1819, and lived there until 1855; going from there to Iowa, locating in Benton County, and engaged in blacksmithing, following this business until 1857, when he engaged in farming. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Twenty-eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, serving until December, 1863; was in the battles of Champion Hill, through the siege of Vicksburg, Fort Gibson and many others. In 1871, he came to Kansas, locating in Chautauqua (then Howard County), and took a claim on Section 26, Town 33, Range 8; it was nearly 100 miles from a railroad, and there were but a few families in this part of the county. Mr. Thompson has improved his place, having it all enclosed with fences, fifty acres under cultivation, a fine orchard of three acres and fine buildings. He has been engaged in stock-raising for the past few years, his farm being well adapted for this business. In 1844, he was married to Miss Eliza Armstrong, of Indiana; their children are -- Lizzie S., Richard L., Mary E., Noville A. (deceased), Jennie E. (deceased)., Mattie M., Gertrude B., William O. and Berdie N. He is a member of the Baptist Church.

D. F. TABLER, miller, was born in Miami County, Ohio, 1829. In 1851, migrated to Fayette County, Iowa, where he remained until the spring of 1857, thence to Kansas, settling in Anderson County and located a claim there, remaining there about four years. During his residence here, he belonged to the State militia which was raised in that county at the Free-State election in 1858; cast the first Free-State vote in Coffey County. In 1861, he took charge of the mills at Leroy, for a time; also had charge of the mill at Burlington. In 1866, built a mill at Lowell, and started the town; thence to Missouri, where he put up a mill and remained there until 1872, when he located at Cedar Vale, Chautauqua County, and built the Big Caney Mills; the mill was a small saw and corn-meal mill but in 1878, commenced building the present mills, 30x50 feet, three run of buhrs, and has both steam and water power; the mill is doing a fine business, and Mr. Tabler is thoroughly posted in milling. In 1851, he was married, in Shelby County, Ohio, to Miss Mary J. Hollingshead; they have five children -- Elizabeth C., Samantha F., Clara A., John P. and Passmore W.; his wife died in 1873, and, in 1876, was married to Miss Melissa J. Maxwell, of Cedar Vale; they have one daughter, Gabriella. He is a member of the M. E. Church.

ELGIN.

Elgin is situated in the southern part of Chautauqua County, on the line of the Indian Territory, and about the center of the county east and west. The town was started in 1869, by L. P. Getman. For a time the town grew rapidly and promised much for the future, being located in the beautiful and fertile valley of the Big Caney River, the extensive settlement of which was to be its main support and stay. The land, however, was not then surveyed, and men calculated on prospects merely, for when the survey was made nearly all the best farming lands were cut off into the Indian Territory, and thus shut out from settlement by the whites. This was a death blow to the town, which at the present time contains but a single business house. It was in this place the first Masonic lodge in the county was organized.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

W. W. ANDERSON, farmer, P. O. Hart's Mills, was born in Parke County, Ind., in 1847, living there until twenty-one years of age. In 1869, he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Howard County. The county was unorganized, the survey was not finished, and there were but few settlers in the county. The subject of this sketch located a claim on Section 6, Town 36, Range 9, which he improved and has carried on since. When he first located here he commenced handling stock, and has been engaged in the business the most of the time since. In 1879 , he engaged in the mercantile business, and served as Postmaster at Hart's Mills, remaining there three years. Mr. Anderson has been very successful in all his business projects, and is one of the enterprising men of his township. In September, 1880, he was united in marriage to Francenia Finch, daughter of Martin Finch, one of the pioneers of Chautauqua County.

B. A. TWEEDY, Postmaster and merchant, Hart's Mills, was born in Vermillion County, Ind., in 1857, and was raised there until twelve years of age, when he located in Edgar County with his parents, remaining there until 1874; thence to Kansas, locating in Chautauqua County. Soon after locating here, he accepted a position in the store of H. Davis at Hart's Mills. At the end of three years, the store changed hands, and he remained in the employ of the new firm. From 1877 until 1883, he served as Assistant Postmaster, and since that time has been Postmaster of Hart's Mills. In April, 1883, he bought the stock of goods of his employer, and at present has the only stock of goods in the place. His store is 25x33, filled with a good stock of general merchandise, and enjoys a good trade. Mr. T. is a wide-awake business man, and has succeeded in getting a good business started, although $2,500 was the extent of his capital when he located in the State. In 1882, he was married to Miss A. C. Hopper, of Chautauqua County, Kan.

L. C. WAIT, merchant and stock dealer, Elgin, was born in Sugaring Falls, Ohio, in 1847. In 1856, he emigrated to Wisconsin, locating in Richland County, where he remained until 1865; then returned East, remaining in New York State one year; thence to Jackson County, Mo., where he remained until 1873. Going from there to Kansas, he located at Elgin, Howard County, and engaged in the drug business. From 1875 to 1882, he had several mail route contracts, a part of them being among the largest contracts in the State. In 1882, he engaged in general merchandising at Elgin, and at present has the only store of the kind in the place. Besides his mercantile business, he is carrying on a large stock farm of 100 acres, close to the town of Elgin. Of this place, has 300 acres in cultivation, the whole place enclosed by fence, except forty acres of timber. The place is watered by the Caney River and Cedar Creek, and is stocked with 700 head of cattle. Since 1879, has been handling from 500 to 700 annually. Mr. Wait not only raises, but buys, feeds and ships a large amount of stock all the time. He has one of the finest farms in the county, it being all bottom land, surrounded by a close attention to business that he has been enable to accumulate so much property, as he came to the State with but a few hundred dollars to invest. In 1882, he was elected County Commissioner for the Second District. In 1868, was married to Miss Florence C. Slaughter, of Barber County, Mo. They have four children. Is a member of Vesper Lodge, No. 136, A., F. & A. M., and Sedan Lodge, No. 154, I. O. O. F.

[TOC] [part 7] [part 5] [Cutler's History]