KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 25

[TOC] [part 26] [part 24] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - MORRILL TOWNSHIP (GORDON - WILLARD).

THOMAS P. GORDON, proprietor of Elevator No. 2, and dealer in grain and live stock, was born in Andrew County, Mo., August 30, 1858, and lived in his native State until July 23, 1879, and then removed to Morrill, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of Morrill Lodge, No. 178, I. O. O. F. Mr. Gordon received his early education at home and completed his studies at the High School at St. Joe, Mo. He left this school in 1878 and immediately thereafter bought a half interest in the general mercantile establishment of J. W. Harris, at Avenue City, Mo., the firm being thereafter known as Harris & Gordon. He continued in business in this city until his removal to Morrill, where he and his partner, Mr. Harris, bought out the extensive mercantile establishment of B. Bird, which they carried on until September, 1881, when Mr. G. sold out his interest and entered into the grain business, in which he has been engaged since. In June, 1882, Mr. Gordon commenced the erection of the elevator now operated by him, and which was completed and put in running order in September of the same year, at a cost of $2,000. The elevator is well equipped with machinery and has a working capacity of 10,000 bushels. During the five months it has been in operation there has been handled and shipped from this elevator thirty cars of wheat and over 30,000 bushels of corn. The elevator has been kept busily employed since its erection; is doing a steadily increasing trade and in the near future promises to do a business second to none of its capacity, on the St. Joe & Western Railroad. Mr. Gordon has been engaged in the live stock business since his advent in Morrill, and during the past two years has shipped stock to the Eastern markets which has amounted to over $80,000 annually. He is still a young man and his rise in the world has been owing to pluck and energy that is highly commendable and rarely equaled (sic).

BENJAMIN HALDEMAN, proprietor of Tonsorial establishment, dealer in cigars and tobacco and general agent for Younce's Indian Cure Oil and Pain Destroyer, was born in Montgomery County, Pa., September 24, 1847, living in his native State until his seventeenth year. When his parents removed to Whiteside, County, Ill., where Mr. H. resided ten and a half years. He then removed to Falls City, Neb., where he resided until the fall of 1878, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating at Morrill, where he has resided and carried on business since. He is a member of Morrill Lodge No. 187, and of Hiawatha Encampment No. 33, I. O. O. F., and is inside guard of his lodge. He was married in February, 1858, in Carroll County, Ill., to Miss Ellen R. Smith, a native of Somerset County, Pa. They have had three children, two of whom are living, named - Elmer Ellis, Samuel Austin and Herbert Morrison (died August 19, 1879). Mr. H.'s father, Samuel Haldeman, is the proprietor of Younce's Indian Cure Oil, and has appointed his son agent for this popular remedy for Morrill and vicinity. It is a well-known (sic) panacea, and is meeting with ready sales where known. Mr. Haldeman is a straightforward (sic), intelligent and enterprising business man, and is well known for his excellent social qualities.

JACOB HOFFMAN, proprietor of billiard hall, was born in Lyons, N. Y., February 4, 1845, but lived in his native State only a short time; his parents removing to Milwaukee County, Wis., where Mr. H. resided until May, 1871, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating near the city of Atchison, where he resided eight years, and from there removed to Morrill, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Sabetha Lodge No. 162, A., F. & A. M. He was married in December, 1882, in the city of Atchison, to Miss Emma Herzog, a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. Hoffman is an active and enterprising business man, fair and honorable in his dealings, and is well and favorably known.

JOSEPH KIRK, farmer and stock raiser, Section 1, Township 2, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Giles County, Va., November 21, 1824, but lived in his native State only a short time, his parents removing to Ross County, Ohio, where Mr. Kirk resided, with the exception of five years spent in Illinois and Iowa, until April 7, 1858, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Palermo, Doniphan County, where he was employed one summer as engineer in the steam flouring and saw mills located at this place. He then removed to Walnut Township, Brown County, where he had charge of the steam saw mill owned and operated by E. N. Morrill at the forks of the Walnut and Mulberry creeks, Meantime he pre-empted the quarter section on which he now lives. In the spring of 1860 he removed to his farm in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Morrill Lodge, No. 187, I. O. O. F., and was the second past grand of this lodge. He was Treasurer of Walnut Township one year. He was married August 14, 1879, in Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Mrs. Louisa Stoffer, a native of Portage County, Ohio. They have two children - Maud Eldora and Bertha Josephine. Mr. Kirk is the prosperous owner of the Pioneer farm. It is a fine upland farm, lying in one of the finest portions of Morrill Township, and contains 241.39 acres. It is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation, and has splendid orchards and groves, is well supplied with water and is one of the model farms of Brown County. The improvements are good and in part comprise large and elegant frame residence, containing eight rooms, with good cellar, stock sheds and stables, tool house and carpenter shop, a fine fruit evaporation and drying house, granaries, corn crib, etc. Mr. K. raises from 300 to 400 bushels of wheat, 200 to 300 bushels of oats, 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn yearly; keeps twenty five head of stock cattle, fifty to seventy-five head of Berkshire and Poland-China hogs and ten head of horses. Mr. K. had the honor of establishing the first postoffice (sic) in Morrill and of naming and securing the appointment of Solomon Meyers as the first Postmaster. Mr. Kirk was also one of the original stockholders and helped to establish the first and only farmers' co-operative store in Morrill. Mr. K. is one of the pioneers of this section of Brown County, a trusted and honored friend of Hon. E. N. Morrill, a prominent Odd Fellow, an honest and practical farmer and a good citizen and neighbor.

E. L. KREIDER, farmer, stock raiser and dealer, Sections 31 and 32, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Sabetha, Nemaha County, was born in Lancaster County, Penn., July 8, 1850, and lived in his native State until April, 1874, when he removed to St. Joseph, Mo., where he was engaged as a clerk in a grocery establishment and resided two years. Thence he removed to Andrew County, Mo., where he resided three years and was engaged in farming. In the spring of 1879 he removed to Kansas, locating in the town of Morrill, Brown County, where he resided two years, and then removed to his farm in Morrill Township, where he has since resided. He was married in the city of Lancaster, Pa., March 17, 1870, to Miss Annie Erb, a native of Lancaster County, Pa. They have one son, Erb. Mr. Kreider owns a fine upland farm of 160 acres; it is all enclosed with substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water by means of wells and springs. His orchard is young and thrifty, covered three acres, and contains 150 bearing apple trees, 200 peach and a number of cherry, plum and pear trees. The farm is also abundantly supplied with small fruits of all varieties. The improvements on the property are excellent and comprise, among others, an elegant new family mansion containing nine rooms, with a good cellar, and surrounded by handsome shade trees, evergreens and shrubbery; a large frame barn, 30x36, with an addition 14x16; granary, 14x18; corn cribs, wagon shed, smoke-house, stock lots, etc. Mr. Kreider contemplates making some additional improvements on his farm in the near future which, when completed, will cause it to rank second to none in the township. Mr. K. raises from 1,000 to 1,200 bushels of rye, 1,000 bushels of oats, 3,500 to 4,000 bushels of corn, cuts twenty-five acres of hay yearly, has twenty acres seeded down to timothy and ten acres to clover, keeps 50 to 75 head of stock cattle, 75 to 100 fine hogs and half-a-dozen head of extra good horses. He deals in cattle quite extensively, buying and selling in the Sabetha markets. He is a young, enterprising and intelligent Pennsylvania farmer, a good and useful citizen, speaks in the highest terms of Brown County, where he has made his means, and, aided by his pretty, amiable and industrious wife, bids soon to be one of the of the solid and prosperous farmers of his adopted State.

S. S. LINDEMAN, manufacturer and dealer in furniture, coffins, sewing machines, organs and musical instruments, window shades, wall paper, pictures and picture frames, window glass, etc., etc., was born in Somerset County, Pa., August 19, 1851, and lived in his native State until the spring of 1877, when he removed to Carroll County, Ill., where he completed his education at the Lanark High School, which he attended until November of the same year, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Morrill township, where he resided until the following February, when he removed to Richardson County, Neb., where he was engaged in farming and in teaching in the public schools of the county. Thence he removed to Morrill, where he erected his dwelling and engaged in carpentering. In January of 1883 he engaged in his present business. He is a consistent member of the German Baptist Church. He was married in Richardson County, Neb., February 3, 1878, to Miss Lydia Peck, a native of Somerset County, Pa. Mr. L. is a young and energetic business man, a good mechanic, possessed of fine inventive abilities, and his commercial and social standing are of the best. His brother, Josiah Lindeman, was a member of Company K., One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. In the fall of 1862, at the age of seventeen years he enlisted at Chambersburg, Pa., went to the front with his regiment, participated in and is supposed to have been taken prisoner by the enemy at the battle of the Wilderness. At all events nothing has been heard of him since. Mr. Lindeman and his family will be under great obligations to any of his former comrades who chance to read these lines, and who may know the fate of their brother, who will inform them of it. Send particulars to S. S. Lindeman, Morrill, Brown Co., Kansas.

JOHN McCOY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 4, Township 2, Range 15, P. O. Sabetha, Nemaha County, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, May 1, 1845, and lived in his native county until June, 1867, when he emigrated to America, locating in Chicago, where he lived for three years and thence removed to Benton Harbor, Berrien Co., Mich., where he lived for three years also; and form there, in 1873, came to Kansas, locating in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has since resided. He is a faithful and zealous member of the Congregational Church at Sabetha. He was married in Benton Harbor, Mich., in 1872, to Miss Victorine C. Nowlen, a native of New York. They have three children living - Jessie M., Ira J. and Edward. "Rock Spring," as the splendid farm of Mr. McCoy is called, lies four miles west of Morrill. It contains 240 acres and is drained by Mulberry Creek, a clear, rapid stream. Has a beautiful fish pond stocked with German carp. Has the finest rock springs in Kansas, one of them having a flow of ten cubic inches; and is one of the most valuable stock farms in the county. The creek flows over a rocky bed through the stock yards, which are admirably arranged for shelter and feeding. Mr. McCoy grown about 4,000 bushels of corn and ten acres each of wheat and oats, sows a field of rye for pasturage; keeps 100 acres in native pasture and meadow, and is giving successful attention to clover and blue grass. He keeps fifty high grade Short-horns of superior beef-getting (sic) types. Has a few very fine thorough breds, which he is breeding to a handsome London Duke Bull, bred by Mr. Cowan, of Missouri; and is making up a herd of pure bred Short-horns that will be an honor to Brown County. He feeds a few first class steers and 100 model pigs. Is breeding Clydesdale horses. Believes in keeping only the best of stock, and is one of the most successful farmers in Brown County. The farm is also further improved with a cosy home, laid off in forty-acres field and fenced with a superior hedge fence, which affords grand protection to stock. A new basement barn, spring house, stone quarry, thrifty young orchard and vineyard; and bears in every feature the thrifty and methodical farmer. Mr. McCoy has made most of his property here in the last nine years. Is an intelligent, progressive, candid Christian gentleman, who believes there is no finer country than this for men who feed grain of their own growing to stock of their own raising.

E. P. MILLER, farmer and stock raiser, Section 2, Township 2, Range 15, P. O. Morrill; born in Stark County, Ohio, February 19, 1843, living however, but a short time in his native State, his parents removing to Huntington County, Ind., where Mr. Miller resided until October, 1870, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Jewell County, where he lived four years, he then removed to Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He has been Clerk of the Board of School District Nol 57, Brown County, three years. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company B, One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted July 4, 1863, at Huntington, Ind., and was discharged March 4, 1864, at Indianapolis, Ind. He took part in an engagement at Clinch River, E. Tenn. After his discharge from the One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment, he again enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Fifty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, on the 23d day of January, 1865, at Huntington, Ind., and was discharged September 1, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. He was married in Huntington County, Ind., January, 1868, to Miss Susan M. Iden, a native of Indiana. They have seven children living - Martha A., John E., Rosa M., Mary Elizabeth, Charles E., Vinnie Ruth, and Sheridan. Mr. Miller owns a fine farm of 165 acres, one and a half miles south of Morrill. It is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a good state of cultivation and well supplied with water. There is a fine orchard on the property which covers five acres, and contains 300 bearing apple, 250 peach, 30 pear and a number of plum and cherry trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the farm, among which are grapes, raspberries, blackberries, gooseberries and currants. The improvements are good, and embrace among others, a new, comfortable and convenient frame cottage, two stories high 18x34, with addition 18x18, and a kitchen 16x17. West of the dwelling is a handsome maple grove. Among the other improvements are stock stables, sheds and lots, corn cribs, 26x32, smoke house, 14x16, etc. Mr. Miller raises 500 to 600 bushels of rye, annually, had 85 acres in corn this year, which averaged 65 bushels to the acres; keeps 10 to 15 head of stock cattle, 100 Poland-China hogs, and 4 head of work horses. Mr. Miller is one of the industrious and prosperous farmers of Brown County, a veteran of the last war, a good citizen and neighber (sic), and is well and favorably known.

HENRY M. PERRY, farmer, stock raiser and dealer Section 6, Township 2, Range 15, P. O. Sabetha, Nemaha County, is the son of John C. and Sallie Perry, who came from Sangamon County Ill., (sic) to Kansas, in October, 1865, locating in Sabetha, Nemaha County, their farm forming subsequently one-half of the old town site of Sabetha, where they resided until 1872. Mr. Perry's father established the first postoffice in Sabetha, and was the second Postmaster of the town. He died May 22, 1871. In 1872, Mr. Perry's mother removed to what is now Morrill township, Brown County, where she still resides. Mr. Perry was born in Wellsburg, Brook Co., W. Va., March 12, 1850. In 1855 his parents removed to Sangamon County, Ill., where they resided until 1865, when the family came to Kansas, where Mr. Perry has resided ever since. Mr. Perry's brother, Thomas C., was a member of Company A, Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was the youngest member of his company, aud (sic) was wounded and taken prisoner by the enemy at Chickamauga, and was taken to Belle Isle, where he died a short time after his capture. Another brother, John J., now a prominent lawyer in New York city, was a Colonel in the Confederate service, having commanded the Fourth Louisiana Cavalry all during the war, and having taken part in one of the last battles of the war, that of Spring Hill, Tenn. The homestead on which Mr. Perry lives contains 146 acres. It is a choice upland farm lying adjacent to the town of Sabetha. Is enclosed with substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water. The orchard covers two acres, and has a great number of all kinds of fruit trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the farm. Near the house is a large and splendid artificial grove of native time, which covers ten acres, and contains over 5,000 walnut, ash, soft maple, box elder and honey locust trees. The buildings on the property are good and consist of a comfortable frame dwelling house containing seven rooms, with extra good cellar, 24x30 feet, with an L 16x18; frame stock stables 20x?0; granaries, corn cribs, smoke house, stock sheds, etc. Mr. Perry raises form 500 to 600 bushels of oats yearly, 1,000 bushels of corn; cuts twenty-five acres of hay, keeps twenty-five head of fine grade cattle, seventy-five to one hundred Berkshire hogs, and four horses and mules. There is at present on his farm and owned by him a pair of bay mules which were brought from Illinois by Mr. Perry's father, in 1865. They are well preserved, are used every day, and in appearance do not look to be over six or eight years old. These mules are known to almost every old settler in the four northeastern counties of the State. Mr. Perry deals extensively in live stock of all kinds, buying and selling. Mr. Perry is a young, intelligent and industrious farmer, a good and useful citizen, and is well and favorably known for his probity and integrity.

C. A. SAYLOR, farmer and stock raiser, Section 3, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Somerset County, Pa., March 8, 1840, and lived in his native State until October, 1863, when he removed to Lee County, Ill., where he resided until June 20, 1870, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Church of God. He was Commissioner of Brown County two years and a member of the Board of School Districts Nos. 11 and 75, Brown County, ten years. He was married in Somerset County, Pa., September 23, 1863, to Miss Annie Lichty, a native of Somerset County, Pa. They have nine children living whose names are: Ira M., Maggie, Carrie, B. Frank, Horace G., Lizzie, John, Mary S., and Gracie. Mr. Saylor owns a fine bottom farm lying on Pedee Creek, five miles northwest of the thriving town of Morrill. It contains 160 acres, is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water by means of wells, springs and Pedee Creek, which flows in a southeasterly direction through the entire length of the farm. On a sunny slope east of the fine dwelling is a thrifty orchard which covers ten acres and is well supplied with fruit trees of various varieties. On the same side of the house is a grove of native timber, covering eight acres and containing great numbers of black walnut, hickory and elm trees. The improvements are among the finest in this section and comprise among others, a new, large, and elegant frame residence, surrounded by a fine lawn adorned by handsome shade trees, shrubbery and evergreens, a large, new and convenient basement frame barn 30x36, a large double corn crib 26x40, with a commodious hog pen under it, stock lots, etc. Mr. S. raises from 400 to 500 bushels of wheat, 300 to 400 bushels of rye, 200 to 300 bushels of oats, 2,500 to 3,500 bushels of corn, cuts 25 acres of hay, has 40 acres seeded down to orchard, blue grass, alfalfa, and red clover, keeps a dozen head of stock cattle, 75 to 100 Poland-China hogs and 7 head of horses. Mr. Saylor is an honest, industrious and intelligent farmer, a good, popular and useful citizen and is well and favorably known for his sterling integrity.

J. L. SCHAEFFER, farmer and dealer in baled hay, Section 6, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Sabetha, Nemaha County, was born in Marion County, Ohio, January 12, 1835, and lived in his native State until his seventeenth year, when his parents removed to Van Buren County, Iowa. Mr. S. lived in Iowa until the fall of 1878, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Sabetha, Nemaha County, where he resided until March, 1883, when he removed to Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He was married in Van Buren Co., Iowa, in 1863, to Miss Mary E. True, a native of Ohio. They have six children - Laura E., Harry E., Jessie Grace, Ollie Blanch, Cora E., and Zora. Mr. Scheffer makes a specialty of cutting, buying, pressing and shipping hay. He has a large Economy press on his farm and is kept busily employed the whole year around, shipping to the markets in St. Joe and Atchison, about 100 tons of hay per month.

JOHN I. SMITH, farmer and stock raiser, Section 24, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Somerset County, Pa., in April 1844, and lived in his native State, until 1856, when his parents removed to Carroll County, Ill., where he resided until October 18, 1876, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the German Baptist Church, and is Clerk of Morrill Township. He was married at Mt. Carroll, Carroll Co., Ill., in July 1864, to Miss Adeline Meyers, a native of Somerset County, Pa. They have five children whose names are: - John J. Astor, Samuel J. Burnworth, Martin A. Byron, William H. Leroy, and Benjamin A. Cecil. Mr. Smith owns a fine upland farm of 160 acres, lying two miles north of Morrill; it is reached by fine roads, is enclosed by substantial fences, is in a high state of cultivation and is well supplied with water by means of wells and Larkin's branch of the Pony which flows through the southeast corner of the farm. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the property which covers two and half acres and contains 125 fruit trees of various varieties. The improvements are good and consist in part of a new, comfortable and cosy frame cottage containing seven rooms, surrounded by handsome shade trees, horse stable, sheds and lots, granary, corn cribs, etc. Mr. S. raises from 500 to 600 bushels of wheat, 100 to 150 bushels of rye, 300 bushels of oats, 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn, cuts twenty-five acres of hay, keeps fifteen to twenty stock cattle, forty to fifty Poland-China hogs, and eight head of fine horses. Mr. Smith is an honest, industrious an dintelligent (sic) Pennsylvanian farmer, a prominent and useful citizen and a good neighbor.

ELMER B. SNYDER, manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles, collars, whips, blankets, etc. The son of J. H. and N. J. Snyder, and was born in 1862, in Richland County, Ohio, but left his native State at an early age, his parents removing to Kansas, and locating in Doniphan County, near Highland, where Mr. Snyder resided until his twenty-first year, when he removed to Morrill, Brown County, where he established himself in business March 1, 1883. He learned his trade with Mr. Norman Case, of Highland, a well-known (sic) manufacturer of harness in that city. Mr. Snyder is a young, energetic and prosperous business man, possesses good credit, and as he is the only dealer in his line in Morrill, commands all the trade in the town of his adoption and for miles around. He carries a large stock, has skilled workmen, a large and growing patronage, manufactures his own saddling, etc., and may be set down as one of the thriving and enterprising business men of the county.

FRANK M. SPALDING, dealer in lumber and building materials, was born in Haverhill, N. H., June 1, 1848, and lived in his native State until his nineteenth year, when he removed to Chicago, where he remained about three years, thence he removed to Lexington, Mich., where he engaged in the general mercantile business, and where he remained about two years, and then removed to Falls City, Neb., where he removed, in 1878, to Morrill, Brown County, where he has resided and carried on business since. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He was married in Falls City, Neb., May 10, 1876, to Miss Julia E. Kingman, a native of New York. They have two children - Phineas and Hattie. Mr. Spalding is one of the successful and energetic business men of Morrill, and deals extensively in all kinds of lumber and building materials. Buying exclusively of first hands and for cash, he is enabled to compete with any one.

F. M. STARNS, farmer and stock raiser, Section 31, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Sabetha, Nemaha County, was born in Geneva, Kane Co., Ill., December 1, 1836, but left his native State at an early age, his parents removing to Fountain County, Ind., where the family lived seven years. Then they removed to Wapello County, Iowa, being among the original settler of this county. Mr. S. lived in Iowa until August, 1856, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating at Fort Plymouth, on Pony Creek, in what is now Morrill Township, where the Free-state forces were congregated under the command of Gen. James H. Lane. The same fall, Mr. Starns pre-empted a claim one and a half miles north of Morrill, where he resided until 1861, when he entered the Union Army as a member of Company D, Eighth Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at Fort Leavenworth, November 9, 1861, and was discharged at Nashville, Tenn., November 8, 1864. At the battle of Chickamauga, in which he participated, he was severely wounded, from the effects of which he suffers to this day. Owing to his wound he did no further duty with the regiment, but after he had in a measure recovered, he was detailed for light duty at the United States General Hospital at Nashville, Tenn., which he performed until his discharge on account of disability and the expiration of his term of service. After his discharge he returned to Kansas and located on his farm in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has ever since resided. He is a zealous and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was Assessor of Walnut Creek Township four years, and a member of the Board of School District No. 52, Brown County, eight years. Mr. Starns was married in Nemaha County, June 19, 1869, to Miss I. J. Vassar, a native of Missouri. They have six children living, whose names are: Alice E., John F., Mary and Martha, twins, Frank M., and Nellie. Mr. Starns owns a fine upland farm of 120 acres one and a half miles northeast of Sabetha. The farm is enclosed by a handsome osage orange hedge, is in a good state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water by means of wells and springs. The improvements are good, and consist of a new and good five-room frame dwelling, a frame barn 32x32 feet, a large corn crib of 1,500 bushels capacity, an 800-bushel granary, smoke house with cellar, etc. Directly north of the dwelling is a handsome grove of native timber which covers two acres, and which, in summer, affords ample shade and acts as an excellent wind-break. Mr. S. devotes his time and attention chiefly to raising corn, hogs, and cattle. He raises 4,000 bushels of corn yearly, keeps 30 to 40 head of fine stock cattle, 40 to 50 stock hogs, and 9 head of excellent horses. Mr. Starns was one of the original Free-state men; a veteran of the War of the Rebellion; is a straightforward, honorable man, and an intelligent, practical and successful farmer.

JAMES B. STEPHENS, real estate agent, was born in Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co., Pa., May 5, 1837, and lived in his native State until his eighteenth year, when he removed to Wood County, Ohio, where he resided one year and then removed to Jones County, Iowa, where he was engaged in farming and where he resided until August 12, 1861, when he enlisted at Anainosa, Iowa, as a member of Company B, Ninth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged at Louisville, Ky., September 24, 1864. He took part among others in the battles of Pea Ridge, Ark., Vicksburg, Siege of Vicksburg, Look Out Mountain, Chickamauga and the Atlanta campaign. At the first attack by the Union forces on Vicksburg, Mr. S. who had by this time attained the rank of Sergeant, was in command of a party who were engaged in laying a pontoon bridge across Chickasaw Bayou. The party while thus engaged was under the severe fire of the enemy for over two hours. After the pontoons were laid, Sergt. (Sic) Stephens found thirteen bullet holes in his overcoat and blouse. After the siege of Vicksburg, Sergt. Stephens was detailed for service in the Ordnance Department where he served until the Atlanta Campaign when he was detailed as a member of the Pioneer Corps, of which he was a member until the surrender of this city, when he was discharged by reason of expiration of service. He endured severe hardships and privations while in the service from the effects of which he suffers to-day (sic). After his discharge from the United States Service he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Mitchell County, where he resided twelve years and was engaged in farming and the real estate business. From Kansas he removed to Nemaha City, Neb., where he resided until the fall of 1882, when he returned to Kansas, locating at Morrill, Brown County, where he has resided since.

A. W. STEWART, painter, grainer and paper hanger, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., December 31, 1836, and lived in his native State until 1873, when he removed to Jersey City where he resided two years and carried on business. In October, 1875, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Morrill, where he has since resided and carried on business. He is a zealous and prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Morrill, and is one of the stewards of this church. He is also a member of the Morrill Lodge, No. 178, I. O. of O. F. and is chaplain of his lodge. He participated in the war of the Rebellion as a member of Company D, Fifth New York Volunteer Infantry, enlisting in New York City, in the fall of 1862, discharged on account of disability contracted while in the service, in New York City in the spring of 1864. He took part in the second battle of Bull Run. Mr. Stewart has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Nyack, Rockland Co., N. Y., in 1858, to Miss Eleanor Smith, a native of New York; she died in the spring of 1870. The second marriage occurred in 1871, in New York City, to Miss Mary F. Conniss, a native of the same city. They have had four children, two of whom are living, they were named as follows: Emma (died in October, 1873), Mamie (died in November, 1875), May B. And Ambrose W., Jr. Mr. Stewart is an energetic, earnest and intelligent business man, a good citizen, and is eminently worthy of the large patronage he is receiving form the residents of Morrill and vicinity.

C. R. VANDOREN, M. D., physician and surgeon, and farmer, Section 25, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Sloan's Village, Schoharie Co., N. Y. His father left New Jersey at an early day, and settled in the Empire State. He was of Holland descent, and his parents spoke the language of that nation. His mother was from Massachusetts. Her maiden name was Sloan, and the village in which Dr. VanDoren was born, was named after her father. In the spring of 1848, he entered the office of Dr. Fox, a prominent physician of Canajoharie, a village of romantic beauty in the valley of the Mohawk, where Dr. Van Doren had formerly pursued his early academic studies preparatory to his collegiate course. In the autumn of 1848, he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City; in the fall of 1849 and winter of 1850, he attended a course of lectures at University Medical College, New York, at the head of which then stood the celebrated Dr. Mott, author of several standard works on surgery, and the first surgeon who successfully performed the operation of typing the arteria innominati. In the autumn and winter of 1850-51, Dr. VanDoren attended his third and last course of lectures in Chicago, at Rush Medical College, where he graduated in the spring of 1851. After practicing in Chicago for one year, he returned East and settled in New Jersey, the home of his forefathers. In 1856 he married Miss Amanda R. L. Meeker, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio. She is a relative of Major Daniel Gano, and of the Penddletons of Cincinnati. The fruit of this marriage was one son - Samuel Elliott, now nineteen years of age. Dr. VanDoren continued to reside in New Jersey until the autumn of 1882, when he and his family wended (sic) their way towards the setting sun taking Greeley's advice to go West. They landed in Morrill, Brown County, November 18, 1882. Dr. V. immediately commenced building on his farm, half a mile north of the village of Morrill. The farm contains 160 acres, and is beautifully located, the surface of the land being undulating in all this portion of Kansas. It commands a fine view of the landscape stretching over hill and vale to Falls City, Neb., and Hiawatha, the county seat of Brown, and all surrounding country, giving a very pleasing prospect to the eye of the visitor or traveler as he rides over this portion of the State, which, when Dr. VanDoren visited it a few years ago in the lovely month of June, was one unbroken expanse of prairie, where every breeze was laden with the fragrance of thousands of flowers, and the whole beautified by tints of varied hues and colors. Dr. VanDoren is a leading and accomplished physician and surgeon. He has had years of experience and is a strong man in the profession.

D. A. VANDERPOOL, notary public and conveyancer, postmaster and dealer in general merchandise, clothing, groceries, coal, etc., etc., was born in Buffalo, N. Y., in May, 1845, and lived in his native State until his seventeenth year, when he moved to Chicago, where he attended Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College one year. He then secured a position in a coal office, and subsequently in a wholesale grocery establishment. He resided two years in Chicago, and then went to St. Joe, Mo., where he was in the employ of the United States Express Company. He remained with this company twelve years, being most of the time stationed at St. Joe. In the spring of 1876, he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he resided two years and engaged in farming; thence removed to Morrill, where he engaged in his present business, and where he has resided since. He is a strict and consistent member of the Christian Church. He is a charter member of Morrill Lodge No. 187, I. O. O. F. He was the first noble grand of the Lodge. He was also a member of Hamlin Lodge No. 87, at the time it was instituted. Is also a member of Hamlin Lodge No. 185, A., F. &. A. M. He has been Postmaster at Morrill for over four years past; he was Clerk of Morrill Township one term; Treasurer of the same township one year, and is at present the only notary public in the township. He was married in St. Joe, Mo., in January, 1868, to Miss Philena Trout, a native of Ohio. Mr. Vanderpool is a careful, conservative and prosperous merchant - does business on the cash basis exclusively. He has made his means on the spot, and is an able and thorough business man. He may be truthfully styled a self-made man, his father dying when Mr. V. was only three years of age, and his handsome competency being acquired by his own unaided exertions.

G. W. WILLARD, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Preston County, Va., September 22, 1819, but left his native State at an early age; his parents removing to Fayette, County, Pa., where they lived about eight years, and then removed to Meigs County, Ohio, where Mr. W. lived until April 23, 1867, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. Mr. Willard was a member of the Board of School District No. 34, Brown County, three terms. He was married in Meigs County, Ohio, April 3, 1850, to Miss Lucinda Roush, a native of Mason County, Va. They have ten children living whose names are - Merchant W., married to Miss Temperance A. Hedgecock, a native of Illinois; Freeman T., Stephen J., married to Miss Alice Cottrell, a native of Indiana; Angeline, Martha E., Carmi A., James C., John R., Walter S. And Hammond B. Mr. Willard owns a fine valley farm of 240 acres, one mile west of Morrill. The St. Joe and West Railroad runs through part of his farm. It is enclosed with substantial fences, in a good state of cultivation, and is well supplied with water. Near the barn is a well of pure water, which is used for stock purposes, and which is raised by one of Ingham & Bigelow's wind mills. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the place, and an abundance of small fruits and a fine grove of native trees. The improvements on the property are first-class, and consist, among others, of a neat and comfortable frame dwelling containing five rooms with good cellar, and one and one-half storied frame barn 30x36, good granaries, corn cribs, etc., etc. Mr. Willard raises from 400 to 500 bushels of wheat, 100 to 200 bushels of oats, 2,500 to 3,000 bushels of corn yearly. Keeps 25 to 30 head of stock cattle, 75 to 100 stock hogs, and a half dozen horses. He is an industrious, prosperous and practical farmer, a prominent and useful citizen, and a good neighbor.

MERCHANT W. WILLARD, farmer, Section 34, Township 1, Range 15, P. O. Morrill, was born in Meigs County, Ohio, June 22, 1852, and lived in his native State until April 23, 1867, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Morrill Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Sabetha Lodge, No. 162, A., F & A. M. He was married October 12, 1876, in the city of Hiawatha, to Miss Temperance A. Hedgecock., a native of Illinois Mr. Willard owns a choice upland farm of 120 acres, one and a quarter miles west of Morrill, on the old State road from White Cloud to Seneca. The farm is enclosed by a handsome Osage hedge and is in a good state of cultivations, and is well supplied with water. The improvements are first class and were built from foundation to roof by Mr. Willard himself who is a born mechanic, and consist in part of a comfortable, cosy frame cottage, 22x30 feet, stock stables, a good granary of 1,000 bushels' capacity, two corn cribs, etc., etc. Near and surrounding the dwelling, is a handsome grove of native timber, planted five years ago, which contains 1,000 cottonwood, maple and box elder trees. There is a thriving young orchard on the property which contains 500 apple, peach, pear and cherry trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits on the place, consisting of grapes, strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries and blackberries. Mr. W. raises about 200 to 300 bushels of wheat, the same quantity of oats, 2,500 to 3,500 bushels of corn, keeps a dozen graded milch (sic) cows, 75 to 100 hogs and five head of horses. In 1876, when he commenced building his home on what is now one of the finest farms, it was a piece of raw prairie. He had but limited means when he commenced, but has by perseverance, industry and grit achieved a handsome competency, and what is better is out of debt. Mr. Willard is a man of rare mechanical skill and is an inventor of no mean gifts. He has worked at and made a success of each of the following names trades and occupations and is ready to work at any of them again at an hour's notice, viz; farmer, carpenter and house builder, stone mason and bricklayer, clock maker, machinist, architect, well digger, platform scale builder and painter. He was the architect and builder among others of the handsome residence of Joseph Kirk, Esq., the elegant house of Mr. James Stoffer, the conveniently arranged barn on his father's farm and the large three storied and costly barn, 54x60 feet, owned by T. T. Myers. He has invented a number of mechanical and labor saving appliances, which have met with favor wherever used.

[TOC] [part 26] [part 24] [Cutler's History]