KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 14

[TOC] [part 15] [part 13] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (BEAL - GILBERT).

WALTER E. BEAL, farmer, Section 22, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson; came to Kansas April 15, 1880, and located in Robinson Township, where he has resided since. Mr. Beal was born in Richland County, Ohio, April 24, 1862, and lived in his native State until he came to Kansas. He was married October 10, 1882, in Hiawatha, to Miss Clara E. [Hams] [Ilams], a native of Morrow County, Ohio. Mr. Beal is a young and energetic farmer, and has charge of 160 acres of fine upland in Robinson Township, belonging to his grandfather, Mr. G. C. Everts, an old Ohioan. The farm is all enclosed, and all under cultivation. The orchard covers six acres, and contains 182 bearing apple, seventy-five peach, and a few plum and cherry trees. The water supply is good and cannot be excelled, and consists of a a good well and a number of never-failing springs. The improvements consist of a new three-room frame dwelling house, stock stable, new granary, corn-crib, etc. Mr. Beal had twenty acres in fall wheat this season, which yielded 27¼ bushels to the acre, forty-five acres in corn, which averaged 55 bushels to the acre, and ten acres of timothy, which yielded two tons of hay to the acre.

JOHN BENGTSON, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 17, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson was born in Hastveda, Krasteanstad, Sweden, January 19, 1840 and lived in his native country until 1865, when he immigrated to America and located in Galesburg, Ill., where he resided one year. The next year he traveled extensively through the States of Kansas and Missouri, and in the fall of 1867 became a resident of Kansas, locating in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is an active and zealous member of the Lutheran Church, and is one of the officers of the congregation to which he belongs. He is also a member of Robinson Lodge, No. 159, A., F. & A. M., and is treasurer of his lodge. He was married in Robinson, to Miss Carrie Ericson, a native of Sweden. They have four children—Nellie, Albert, Hermina and Emma. “Wheatland,” as Mr. Bengtson’s farm was aptly christened by the correspondent of the Chicago Industrial World, lies on a branch of the Wolf River, and is a valuable estate. It is finely watered by that stream and springs, contains 320 acres, forty of which are woodland, four miles of hedge, and a pretty house, and gives the enterprising owner a yearly yield of 1,000 to 1,500 bushels of wheat, 4,500 bushels of corn, 400 bushels of oats and some rye. He feeds a carload of hogs, keeps fifty head of good grade cattle, raises some good horses for the market, and is one of the most thrifty, thorough and successful farmers in this region. Mr. Bengtson came to Brown County fifteen years ago without a dollar, and now owns an estate worth at least $9,000, and stands high in the community in which he lives for sterling character and public spirit.

E. C. BROWN, dealer in general merchandise, member of the firm of M. P. Rush & Co., came to Kansas September 18, 1870, and located at Robinson, where he has resided and carried on his business since. He is a member of Robinson Lodge No. 159, A., F. & A. M., of which lodge he is secretary. Mr. Brown was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., May 16, 1850, and lived in his native State until his fourteenth year, when his parents removed to Branch County, Mich. Mr. Brown resided in Michigan about five years, and then came to Kansas. He is a young and energetic business man, and his firm does the principal trade in the city of Robinson.

CHARLES L. CARROLL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 17, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas May 15, 1858, locating at Sumner, Atchison County, where he resided ten months, and then removed to Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He has been Constable of Robinson Township one term, Treasurer and Clerk of the same township one term each, and Commissioner of Brown County one term. He is a prominent and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He took part in the war of the Rebellion during the Price raid as a member of Captain Swayze's Company, of the Nineteenth Regiment Kansas Militia, and enlisted in Robinson; served seventeen days and was mustered out of service at Lawrence. Mr. Carroll was born in Richmond, Chittenden Co., Vt., December 3, 1827, and lived in his native State until he removed to Kansas. He was married in Washington County, Vt., in 1850, to Miss Lucy Scribner, a native of Vermont. They have two children living—Charles E. and Alice (married to James E. Curtis, a native of New York). Mr. Carroll has a fine farm, divided into upland and bottom land. It is all enclosed and has 120 acres in cultivation, the remainder being timber land. His orchard contains 120 apple, 30 cherry, 75 peach and a few pear and plum trees. There is an abundance of good water on the farm, comprising three wells and a great number of fine springs. The middle fork of Wolf Creek flows nearly through the center of the farm. The improvements consist of a fine seven-room frame dwelling house, with cellar, and surrounded by handsome shade trees and evergreens, frame barn with basement, 28x32 feet, granary, etc. Mr. C. had eighty acres in corn this season, which averaged fifty bushels to the acre, and twelve acres of rye, which averaged twenty bushels to the acre. He does an extensive business in feeding and fattening hogs and cattle, which he disposes of in the home markets. His farm lies two and a half miles from the town of Robinson, and is well calculated for a grain and stock farm.

REV. ORIN A. CHAPMAN, pastor of Robinson Circuit and Church of the United Brethren in Christ, was born in Sheffield, Lorain Co., Ohio, February 7, 1834, and lived in his native State until his twenty-seventh year, and then removed to Lake County, Ind., where he resided six years, and in November, 1865, became a resident of Kansas, locating in Greenwood County, near Eureka, where he resided one year, and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Ottawa, Franklin County. While residing in this city he became an itinerant in the Church of the United Brethren, and had charge of a circuit stretching through the counties of Coffey, Woodson and Allen, in this State. He was in charge of this circuit one year, and afterwards was stationed for a time in Miami, Douglas, Osage, Marion, Dickinson, Pottawatomie, Jackson, Jefferson and Leavenworth counties. Then again in Jackson County, then in Nemaha, and then was sent to Brown County, where he has charge of the circuit already named. He participated in the War of the Rebellion as a non-commissioned officer in Company A, Seventy-third Regiment, Indiana Infantry, and was enlisted at Crown Point, Lake Co., Ind., July 28, 1862. In July of the next year, owing to injuries he sustained while in the United States service, he was transferred to Company K, Eighth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, and was discharged in July, 1865. He took part in the Battle of Stone River. He was married in Erie Co., Pa., March 25, 1858, to Miss Olive K. Barker, a native of Erie Co., Pa. They have eight children living, whose names are: Lottie (married to Theodore Mathers, a native of Ohio), Willie, Emma, Ella, Carrie, Scott, Minnie, and Frank. Mr. Chapman is a self-educated man, a devoted and zealous pastor, a preacher of remarkable gifts, and is loved and revered by the members of his church.

M. V. CHRISTY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 22, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, came to Kansas in January, 1868, locating in Washington Township, where he resided one year and then removed to Robinson Township where he has resided since. Mr. Christy was born in Morrow County, Ohio, January 19, 1836, and lived in his native State until 1859, and then went to Calaveras County, Cal., where he was engaged in mining and prospecting. He resided in California until the fall of 1865, and then returned to his Ohio home where he resided until he came to Kansas. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place near Mount Gilead, Ohio, May 1, 1867, to Miss Martha Finley, a native of Ohio; she died in 1873. The second marriage occurred in January, 1875, in Morrow County, Ohio, to Miss Elmira Hull, a native of Ohio. They had three children, two of whom are living—Zoe Estella, Mattie (died in March, 1882) and Harry Hull. Mr. Christy has a choice upland farm of 160 acres, all enclosed and all in cultivation. His orchard covers about three acres and contains 200 bearing apple, 100 peach and 25 pear and cherry trees. There is also an abundance of small fruits and grapes on the farm. The water supply can not be excelled and consists of springs and a never failing well. The improvements consist of a seven-roomed frame dwelling house, surrounded by handsome evergreens and shade trees, frame barn, granary, corn crib and other out-buildings. Mr. Christy had 6 acres in oats this season, which averaged 40 bushels to the acre; 16 acres in barley, which yielded 30 bushels to the acre, and 75 acres in corn which averaged 55 bushels to the acre. He is one of the enterprising and successful farmers of Brown County.

AUSTIN CLOSE, farmer and stock raiser, west half of Section 36, Township 2, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Union County, Penn., February 3, 1838 and lived in his native State until his eighteenth year, and then removed to Sandusky County, Ohio, where he lived ten years and was engaged in farming. From Ohio he came to Kansas, locating, March 25, 1866, at Highland, Doniphan County, where he lived three years and was engaged in farming. He then removed to his farm in Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Congregational Church. He was married in Erie Co., Ohio, in 1861, to Miss Angelina Mathews, a native of Ohio. They have three children—Henry Boyer, Dora and Alice. Mr. Close owns a fine upland farm of eighty acres, all enclosed and all in cultivation. This orchard covers two acres and contains 100 apple, 500 peach and abundance of small fruits and grapes. The improvements consist of a new frame French cottage dwelling, with seven rooms, surrounded by handsome evergreens and shade trees. The dwelling is built on a elevated site and from it a fine view of the cities of Troy, Highland and Hiawatha can be had. The other improvements are a stock stable, granary, corn crib, etc. Mr. Close is one of the energetic and thrifty farmers of Brown County, and in addition to tilling his own farm cultivates thirty acres of rental land in close proximity to his own farm. He makes a specialty of raising fine hogs, of which he sells quite a number each year. He raised this season 1,761 bushels of small grain and 1,800 bushels of corn.

MILES COOK, junior member of the firm of Terrill & Cook, dealers in groceries, provisions, queensware, boot, shoes, etc., came to Kansas in March, 1879, and located in Robinson, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of Robinson Lodge No. 98, I. O. O. F., of which lodge he is recording secretary. He participated in the late war as a private of Company B, Thirty-sixth Regiment Iowa Infantry, and enlisted August 24, 1862, at Christianburg, Iowa, and was discharged September 24, 1865, at Davenport, Iowa. He took part in the battles of Helena, Ark., in the Tallahatchian expedition, Shell Mound and numerous other engagements. Mr. Cook was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1833, and lived in his native State until his third year when his father removed to Dearborn County, Ind., where Mr. Cook lived until his twenty-first year and then removed to Wapello County, Iowa, where he resided until he came to Kansas. He is known for his strict business integrity and probity, and the firm of which he is a member do a large and safe business. He was married November 26, 1882, to Miss Fanny Hendy, a native of New York City, where she resided until her fourteenth year when she removed to Illinois, where she resided until her twenty-third year, when she removed to Brown County, Kan., where she has since resided.

ABRAHAM COLE, ESQ., farmer and stock raiser, P. O. White Cloud. Came to Kansas in June, 1857, locating in what was then Irving Township, now Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has since lived. Esquire Cole was one of the Judges of Election at the Roy’s Creek Precinct, in Irving Township at the time of the rejection of the Lecompton Constitution. He was Justice of the Peace of his township in 1858-59. He is a member of the Evangelical Church, and of White Cloud Lodge, No. 6, I. O. O. F. He participated in the late war, during the Price Raid, as Commissary Sergeant of Company B, Nineteenth Regiment, Kansas Militia, and enlisted at Fort Leavenworth in the fall of 1864, served fourteen days and was discharged in the city of Atchison. He was born in York County, Pa., December 15, 1821, and lived in his native State until his tenth year, then his parents removed to Columbiana County, Ohio, where he lived until his twenty-first year and then removed to Holt County, Mo., where lived two years, and then returned to his old home in Ohio, where he lived eleven years, and then removed to Kansas. He was married in Columbiana County, Ohio, October 9, 1843, to Miss Magdalena Hahn, a native of Columbiana County. They have had seven children, of whom only three are living, viz: Tobias, (married to Miss Margaret [Ulch] [Uich], a native of Kansas. They have one child, a son.) Mary, (married to Elias Fintzinger, a native of Allentown, Pa.,) and Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Cole has a fine upland farm which contains 320 acres. It is all under fence and all in cultivation. The improvements consist of a frame dwelling house, large stock barn, new granary, smokehouse, milkhouse and other farm buildings. He has plenty of good, pure living water on his farm, a fine spring rising near the house which is conveyed, by means of a hydraulic ram through iron pipes, to his dwelling and barn. Another fine spring rises in his pasture land in the northwest section of his farm. His orchard covers fourteen acres, and contains 750 apple, 1,500 peach, 50 cherry, 25 pear, 15 prune and apricot, and a few mulberry trees. He has a small vineyard which covers one acre and has about 200 vines. A portion of the grapes from these vines are manufactured at the proper season, into wine for his own use, while the rest of the grapes not needed for family use, are sold in the markets of Hiawatha, White Cloud and Highland. Esquire Cole devotes his attention to raising grain, cattle and hogs. He has a small herd of fine blooded Durham cattle, and about 100 Poland China hogs. Mr. Cole comes of honest Pennsylvania stock and follows the Pennsylvania mode of farming, which is too well known to need description.

HIRAM CROUNSE, farmer, Section 9, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson, was born in Albany County, N. Y., June 7, 1825, and lived in his native State until March, 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, near Wathena, where he resided but a short time and then removed to Robinson Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He was a charter member of Robinson Lodge, No. 159, A., F. & A. M. and is J. W. of this lodge. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity ere his arrival in Kansas, having been a member of Port Byron Lodge, No. 35, Port Byron, Cayuga Co., N. Y. He has been a member of the School Board of the City of Robinson three years, and is Justice of the Peace of Robinson Township. He took part in the last war as a member of Company C, Ninth Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, and enlisted in Auburn, N. Y., August 29, 1864, and was discharged in Rochester, N. Y., July 1, 1865. In one of the hotly contested battles before Petersburg Mr. Crounse was severely wounded, and was for a long time confined in Lincoln General Hospital, in Washington, D. C. Subsequently, he was transferred to the United States Hospital, in Rochester, N. Y., where he remained until his discharge. He was married in Cayuga County, N. Y., in February, 1845, to Miss Caroline E. Snow, a native of New York. They have three children; Elizabeth, Belle, (married to E. H. Snyder, a native of, and a resident of Illinois,) and Mary Emma. Esquire Crounse owns a choice upland farm of seventy-one acres. It is all enclosed with substantial fences and has sixty-five acres in cultivation, the remainder being timber land. The farm is well watered, having a number of good wells, and Wolf River flowing through the north part of it. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the property. The improvements are good and consist of a comfortable frame dwelling, containing six rooms, a good frame barn, corn crib, granary, etc. Esquire Crounse raises from 200 to 225 bushels of wheat, 50 to 75 bushels of rye, 250 to 300 bushels of oats, 800 to 1,000 bushels or corn, keeps 8 to 10 head of stock cattle, 25 to 30 head of hogs and 4 horses. He is an honored Magistrate of his township, a thorough farmer and a good citizen.

CURTIS N. DeWOLF, meat market, was born February 9, 1847, in Boone Co., Ill., and lived in his native State until his fourth year, when his mother (his father having died) removed to Erie County, Pa., where Mr. DeWolf lived until his sixteenth year, when he entered the U. S. army as a member of Company B, Independent Battery, Pennsylvania Artillery. He enlisted in the city of Erie, Pa., February 2, 1864, and was discharged at Victoria, Texas, November 2, 1865. He took part in the battles of Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro’, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville and other minor engagements. After his discharge he staid in Pennsylvania until the April following and then became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he resided until 1867, and then removed to Robinson, B own County, where has resided since. He was married in Robinson in April, 1875, to Miss Eliza J. Crozier, a native of Kansas. They have three children, whose names are: Emery, Jessie and Alice. Mr. DeWolf is an honest, upright business man, has a big list of friends, and deserves them all.

JOHN A. DOWELL, proprietor of Rosedale Farm, Section 29, P. O. Robinson, became a resident of this State in June, 1857; in July of the year following he pre-empted 160 acres of his present farm and was one of the pioneers of Brown County. He is now the possessor of one of the finest and best improved farms in the county, containing 320 acres, entirely surrounded by a beautiful hedge fence. There is a fine grove of forest trees of over twenty years’ growth, planted by Mr. Dowell’s own hand, and fruit trees in abundance of all the choicest varieties, both large and small, and during a walk through this orchard it would indeed be difficult to realize that one were not in some of the old settled eastern States of Ohio or Pennsylvania. The residence of Mr. Dowell is a spacious dwelling of modern architecture, two stories high, the material frame. The proprietor of this large and well-regulated farm is also extensively engaged in stock raising and has some very fine specimens of graded cattle. Mr. Dowell is a native of Warren County, Va., and was born March 2, 1830, and removed to Licking County, Ohio, in 1847, where he farmed for four years. He then removed to Union County, Ohio, where he remained until 1856 and then removed to Tama County, Iowa, where he lived until his removal to this State. He stayed here through all the trials, troubles and difficulties during the border troubles, always standing firm in his belief, though his life was threatened many times. During the years 1860 and ’61 he worked for one bushel of wheat per day, which was then worth only twenty-five cents per bushel, and this wheat he took to the mill and had ground into flour for the sustenance of his family. Notwithstanding the drought of 1860, the Border troubles, the panic of 1873 and the grasshopper plague, Mr. Dowell never lost his confidence in the future of this country, of which he always has been and is a strong admirer. He was married in November, 1858, at White Cloud, Kansas, to Miss Mary C. Northern, by whom he has six children living, Emma, Elmer E., George H., Charles, Hattie and John. Mr. Dowell has served seven years as a member of the Board of Education of District No. 25, this district having been organized at his residence.

JOHN GEORGE FIECHTER, farmer, Section 22, Township 3, Range 18, P. O. Robinson; was born in Baden, Germany, March 27, 1815, and lived in his native country until his twenty-first year, when he immigrated to America, locating in New Orleans, where he stayed five months. From there he went to Clark County, Ind., where he resided three and half years, and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Andrew County, Mo., where he resided twenty-two years, and was engaged in farming. In October, 1861, he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Robinson Township, Brown County where he has lived ever since. He has been a member of the Board of School District, No. 21, Brown County, three years. He has been married twice. The first marriage took place in Andrew County, Mo., in 1842, to Miss Cyntha Ann Deakins, a native of Iowa. Three children were the fruits of this marriage, one of whom is living—John, a soldier of the last war, a former member of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment, Kansas Infantry. The second marriage took place in 1846, in Andrew County, Mo., to Miss Annie Breit, a native of Switzerland. They had seven children, six of whom are living—William Frederick, married to Miss Hermina Dean, a native of Prussia, Germany; Louisa, married to C. M. Truex, a native of Missouri; Susan, married to S. E. Rush, a native of Illinois; Samuel Edward; Tina, married to Oscar Dean, a native of Prussia; and Jacob. Mr. Fiechter owns a large and excellent upland farm of 320 acres. It is mostly enclosed, and has 160 acres in cultivation, the balance being timber and pasture land. His orchard covers six acres and contains a great number of apple, peach and cherry trees, there is also half an acre of grapes on the farm. The supply of water is abundant, in addition to a number of wells and springs; it has Fiechter’s branch of the Wolf flowing through the centre of it. The improvements consist of a comfortable frame dwelling, large frame barn, granary, etc. He has twenty-five acres in wheat this season, which yielded twenty-one bushels to the acre, eighteen acres in oats which yielded forty bushels, and sixty acres in corn, which averaged forty bushels to the acre. Mr. F. is one of the solid and substantial farmers of Brown County, and is an honest hard working German, who has demonstrated in his own case, what can be done in this county by intelligent and well directed labor.

JAMES A. GILBERT, dealer in groceries, queensware, boots and shoes, pocket and table cutlery. Came to Kansas in May, 1868, and located in Robinson, where he taught school until 1875, when he accepted a position in the general mercantile house of Charles Hack, where he continued until 1879, when he went into business for himself. Mr. Gilbert is Clerk of Robinson Township, and has held the office for two years. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was Sergeant in Company C, Ninty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted at Camp Chase, Ohio, August 12, 1862. He was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., August 14, 1865. He took part in the battles of Richmond, Ky., Vicksburg, Tupelo siege of Nashville, Spanish Fort, and other engagements. At the battle of Richmond, Ky., he was taken prisoner by the rebel forces under the command of Major General Kirby Smith. He was however, shortly afterward, parolled. Mr. Gilbert was born in Washington County, Md., November 5, 1840, and lived there until his sixth year, when his parents removed to Henry County, Ind. Shortly afterward his parents removed to Montgomery County, Ohio, where they lived two years, and then moved to Franklin County, in the same State, where Mr. Gilbert lived until he entered the United States Army; after his discharge from the service, he returned to his Ohio home, where he resided until he came to Kansas. Mr. Gilbert married May 1, 1879, in Robinson, Miss Harriet J. Abbott, a native of Illinois, she died June 28, 1881. Mr. Gilbert is a fair and honorable business man and does a thriving trade and is respected by all who know him.

[TOC] [part 15] [part 13] [Cutler's History]