KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS


Andreas' History of the State of Nebraska
PAWNEE COUNTY
Produced by Dick Taylor.




Part 3


TABLE ROCK.

    The town derives its name from a large table rock situated on the high land near the village, but by whom it was given, and when, is not known. Although the site of Table Rock was chosen and partially surveyed by the Table Rock Town Company in 1855, actual settlement did not begin until 1857, when the Nebraska Settlement Company purchased the interests of the former company. The settlement company induced about two hundred families to emigrate from Pennsylvania and New York, under the impression that a railroad was about to be built at once from St. Joe westward along the Nemaha Valley to the mountains -- and the company believed it themselves. The town was surveyed by R. V. Muir, in June, 1858, and its site occupied the south half of Section 32, Town 3, Range 12 east, C. W. Giddings being, at the time, General Superintendent of the settlement company.

    In July, 1858, T. Orchard, W. Johnson, R. Dark, W. Dark, I. Burns, I. Lakie, C. W. Giddings, W. M. Chambers, H. N. Gere, R. F. Chatfield, A. Fellers and A. L. Blodgett asked the Court of Commissioners to incorporate Table Rock as a town, and establish a police force, Messrs. Giddings, Chambers, Gere, Lakie and Orchard being proposed as Trustees. But other days were in store for Table Rock. Many looked upon the settlement company as a sort of monopoly, not any account to be encouraged. Hard times threw their shadow over the enterprise, and the wet season of 1858 put the finishing touch upon it. Elder C. W. Giddings has furnished the following items, which cover the early history of Table Rock:

    "The season of 1858 commenced wet; the rains continued, increasing until about the 1st of August, when the waters suddenly rose in the night several feet above the banks of the streams. The valley was inundated, and the cultivated lands, being on the bottoms, and the cabins of the settlers on the banks of the streams, much damage was done and great suffering prevailed. This wet season was followed by various forms of bilious diseases, of which the chills and fever was the most formidable, and the people, especially those from the East, had the 'blues,' making pertinent the prayer of the Rev. J. M. Chivington, at the first quarterly meeting he held in Table Rock --- 'that the Lord would send the people here and make them so poor that they could not get away.' So greatly discouraged were the settlers generally, that, at the end of the year 1858, out of 150 families who had, during the eighteen months preceding, came to make themselves homes in Table Rock and vicinity, but fifteen families remained. These trials of our faith in the capabilities of this new country brought the remaining settlers generally to the sober realities of developing the country by their own industry and enterprise; and, notwithstanding the reverses, they have rapidly advanced in numbers till the precinct is the most numerous in the county.

    "Table Rock claims the honor of organizing the first church in the county. This was done in l857,by Rev. C. V. Amold, then a member of the Wyoming Conference, Pennsylvania, and consisted of forty members. Our Sunday school was organized the same year, and is probably the oldest in the county.

    "The meetings for public worship, the meetings of the literary society, and all other public gatherings, were held at the house of C. W. Giddings for nearly four years, and such was the zeal manifested in these gatherings that some kind of a meeting was held nearly every night in the week.

    "A good, substantial stone schoolhouse was built in 1881-62, and the public meetings were then removed to the schoolhouse. This building was, at the time of its erection, the largest and best schoolhouse in Southern Nebraska, and probably the best in the State. It still remains as a monument of the enterprise and zeal of the first settlers, though it has been superseded in its original uses by a much better house.

    "As many came to Table Rock who did not remain long enough to become settlers, we shall omit their names in this record, it being desirable to perpetuate the memory of those who may be regarded as real settlers of this vicinity. We make honorable mention of H. N. Gere, John Fleming, A. E. Haywood, H. Billings, Andrew Fellers, William Fellers, C. V. Dimond, R. H. Samson, Elisha Mott, John Morley, J. Williams, Robert Nesbitt, C. L. Griffing, Joseph Griffing, William Smith, John A. Jones, Hamilton Cooper, Samuel Taylor, Richard Hogan, W. Hogan, Robert Taylor, James Cotter, H. S. Jenkins, Livingston G. Jenkins, John C. Wood, Charles Wood, Dwight Fowler, William McNeal, J. Dobson, William Chambers, Julius Tyler, M. J. Mumford, William Arnett, George McMahon, Samuel McMahon, A. Armstrong, E. Marker and Clark Alexander. These all settled here before the fall of 1858, nearly all having families, who bravely and nobly bore the hardships and endured the toils of frontier life.

    "A little later came C. H. Lane, James Purcell, Richard Linn, John Linn, S. T. Linn, J. L. Linn, W. S. Linn, T. A. Linn, William Linn, E. A. Hanson, John Taylor, M. H. Marble, J. Allison, G. W. J. Dare, John Blacklaw and Israel Cummings; and still later, a host of others, too numerous to mention.

    "The first frame house, the first barn, the first frame bridge, the first brick-kiln, the first brick house and the first cistern in the county were built in or near Table Rock.

    "The Table Rock Commissioners' District has been represented in the Board of County Commissioners by the following-named gentlemen, in the order in which they are here recounted: H. N. Gere, Hiram Billings, C. W. Giddings, Nicholas Steinauer, Joseph Pepoon and John Blacklaw.

    "Five years of our history, we have had no legal representative in the Commissioners' Court of Pawnee County; the gentleman acting in that capacity living out of the district, and having been forced upon us by a domineering majority in defiance of the law governing the case. Of the county officers (not the Commissioners), five have been elected, viz.: John Fleming, County Clerk; Julius Tyler, County Clerk; S. H. Cummings, County Treasurer; William Ballance, County Superintendent of Public Schools; and O. D. Howe, County Surveyor.

    "Julius Tyler was our first school-teacher, and Miss F. C. Giddings, now Mrs. Norris, the second.

    "H. N. Gere was our first Sunday School Superintendent, and M. J. Mumford our second.

    "Regular religious services were commenced on the first Sabbath in June, and were conducted alternately by G. L Griffing, Gabriel Westfall and C. W. Giddings for nearly one year, when a petition was sent to the Kansas and Nebraska Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, then in session at Omaha, praying for the organization of a circuit in Pawnee County, and embracing the western tier of precincts in Richardson County, and the appointment of a preacher to the same. In answer to this petition, Table Rock Circuit was organized, and Rev. Mr. Miner placed in charge. he cam around once, and disappeared to return no more. We have, however, been supplied by the Bishop, or the Presiding Elder in charge of the work, every year since, and out of the small beginning has grown Pawnee City Station, Cincinnati, Humboldt and Table Rock, and a circuit in the western part of the county -- of what name we are ignorant. We would not omit to mention the names of men who have done us good service in sustaining the moral and religious interests of the community, such as J. W. Taylor, A. G. White, Mr. Blackburn, Isaac Burns, Hiram Burch, Martin Pritchard, L. W. Smith, T. J. Wood and J. W. Adair.

    "The following firms have carried on the mercantile business in Table Rock: Wood & Moore, H. Strickler & Brother, Lane & Cooper, Osmyn Griffing, Curtis Peavy & Co. (G. L. Griffing being the other member of the firm) and Hurlburt & C. H. Norris. In the early settlement of the county, the business in merchandising was not lucrative, and the purchasers made more out of the business than the merchants.

    "During the first three years of our history, our market was in the towns on the banks of the Missouri River. The streams no being bridged, the hauling of our surplus produce was attended with great inconvenience and expense, greatly discouraging to the farming interests of the Rocky Mountains and opening of the freighting business westward gave a new impetus to the farming interests of the settlements, by furnishing a reading paying home market for everything we could produce, and the day of prosperity dawned upon us like the shining of a clear sun after a long and dreary storm. This continued till the opening of the Union Pacific road, when the price of freight on that road rendered it impossible for our freighters to compete with it, and prices went down to almost no sales. In the freighting business, which gave to the farming interests of our county so much income, Table Rock has the honor of opening the first road west, and of sending the first load of grain to Fort Kearney. This was done by C. W. Giddings, in 1859. The load consisted of eighty bushels of oats.

    "In 1871-72, the A. & N. Railroad Company projected and built their road along the valley of the Nemaha, giving to this precinct all the advantages of a railroad communication with the rest of the world, and the prospect of being the largest and most business town in the county.

    "The two parties in politics were nearly equally divided in the early settlement of the Territory, the Democrats having the majority; but the coming of about one hundred and fifty voters under the auspices of the new settlement gave the majority to the Republicans, secured the election of Daily, to Congress and gave to them an advantage they have been able to hold.

    "G. L. Griffing has been twice elected to represent the people in the Nebraska Legislature, he being the only man residing in Table Rock Precinct who has been this honored."

    Table Rock felt a reviving influence when the A. & N. road was built through it and the northeastern corner of Pawnee County. the railroad built a hotel, known as the Abell House, and several business houses commenced to drive a thriving trade. Quite a settlement had grown up by the time (1881) that the Wymore Extension of the Republican Valley road was built. At times, it seemed as if the upper town would be deserted. The low land, however, was so subject to floods that the citizens came to the conclusion that the old site was the best, and, two years ago, a paper was extensively signed by them, agreeing to remove their buildings and their business interests to the upper town. All except a few houses did so. Table Rock -- the upper and lower towns -- now number about four hundred people. It contains a good district school, graded, attended by 100 pupils, and in charge of S. A. Hoover. Father August Rausch has charge of a Catholic mission, and Rev. R. J. Randall is Pastor of a flourishing Methodist Episcopal Church.

    The Odd Fellows Lodge, No. ee, is the only secret society, and was chartered July 4, 1872. C. H. Norris, a leading merchant of the county, is Noble Grand.

    Mrs. E. V. Lindsly runs the hotel which accommodates the upper town.

    John Blacklaw operates a water-power grist-mill, which has three run of buhrs.

    Otherwise, the business of the place is represented by three general stores, two hardware, two drug, one restaurant, two blacksmith shops, one wagon shop, two livery stables, one lumber-yard, a grocery store and a meat-market.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

    D. C. ANDREWS, merchant Table Rock was born and reared in Somerset County, Me. In 1858, he went to Wisconsin, but soon after removed to Iowa, where he was engaged until the a broke out, at which time he enlisted in Company B, Seventh Indian Volunteer Infantry, 1861, and remained in active service till the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged as veteran pensioner. In 1867, he came here, and has been actively indentified with the industry of the locality since. In 1872, he was married to Miss Ellen Allan, born in Kentucky and reared in Illinois, and who passed away from this life, February, 1881, and is buried in the Jacobs Cemetery here. Mr. Andrews has a family of two sons and two daughters -- Mina, Nellie L., Dudley and Murvilla.

    ANDREW FELLERS, merchant, Table Rock, was born in Columbia County, N. Y., and came to Nebraska in 1858, and located in Pawnee County, where he has been active in the agricultural and business industries of the locality since. In 1856, he married Miss Mary Hill, in Pennsylvania, who was born in Luzerne County, and who passed away from this life in 1873,and is buried in the cemetery here. He has a family of three sons and three daughters -- Isobel, Llewellyn, Louisa, Mary, Alice, John and Lewis. In 1874, he was married to Kate Shorts, who was born in Pennsylvania.

    WILLIAM FELLERS, merchant. Table Rock, was born in Columbia county, N. Y., and came to Nebraska in 1857, and located in Pawnee County, where he has followed farming very successfully since. In the meantime. he established the present successful business. He was married in 1855,10 Miss Susanna E. Freeman, born in Wayne County, Penn. They have a family of three sons end three daughters -- Osman W., Marion N., Annie M., Willie C., Minnie and Mattie.

    SIMON LUTHY & CO., proprietors of the Luthy Mills. The mills are located at Table Rock Precinct, Pawnee County, on the A. & N. Division of the B. & M. R. R. and were built by Mr. Simon Luthy in 1881. They have a capacity of 20,000 bushels per annum. They have three run of stone, two sets of buhrs and five reels of bolting; are run by water-power from the Nemaha River. Mr. Simon Luthy is a native of Switzerland, and was born in Berne in 1845, and was reared, educated and learned the millwright trade there, at the age of twenty-one. In 1869, he came to America, and settled in this State, where he engaged in the saw-mill and carpenter business until 1819, when he retired from it and took up the milling business, which he has successfully conducted since.

CINCINNATI.

    Although the village was platted as early as 1857, and the first settlers of the county located in the immediate vicinity, Cincinnati has not grown to alarming proportions. It is situated but a short distance from the State line, on the South Branch of the Nemaha River, and has a population not to exceed seventy-five. This stream furnishes water-power for a grist-mill, operated by John Fries, one of the pioneers of Pawnee County, and who, in the spring built the first manufactory of the kind in the county. A fine iron bridge now spans the river.

    Cincinnati contains also a hotel, owned by M. L. Harrington; a drug store and a blacksmith shop. Being away from the railroad, however, it is probable that the village can hardly grow into more than a quiet, pleasant little hamlet, the resting-place of a few families who have withdrawn from the bustle of active life. The German Baptists have a society here, and have preaching by Elder William Pullen.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

    GEORGE T. BOBST, farmer and stock-raiser. Section 25, Cincinnati P. 0., was born and reared in Ohio, and followed the trade of tailor till June 11, 1854, when he came here, and has been actively connected with the farming and stock industry of this locality since. On June 11, 1863, he was married to Miss Mary E. Taylor, who was born in Massachusetts and reared in Kansas. They have a family of two sons and six daughters -- Robert, Mattie, Mary, Emily, Minnie, Grace, Maud and Edmund. Mr. Bobst has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

    JOHN FRIES, stock-raising, milling. Cincinnati, was born in Bucks County, Penn., and reared in Columbiana County, Ohio, where, in the early part of his life, he was identified with the farming and milling industry, which he subsequently left and followed the business of engineer and pilot on the Ohio and Lower Mississippi River. In 1850, he came west and went through to California, where he followed mining till, in 1856, he came here, and has very actively prosecuted his present industry here since. In 1858, he was married to Miss Annie Wilman, who was born in Pennsylvania, and reared In Blackford County, Ind. They have one adopted son --Albert Fries, formerly Fisher. Mr. Fries has been an active worker in the development of the many different industries of his locality since coming here.

    P. J. FIRSTENBERGER, general merchandise, Cincinnati. Mr. Firstenberger was reared in Ohio, where he was identified with the mercantile industry for several years. In 1875, he removed to Chicago, when, after prosecuting his business for three years, he went to Seneca, Kan., and in 1880, he came here and began his present business, which he has successfully conducted since. In 1879, he was married to Miss Lou Cleve, who was born and reared in Ohio. They have one son -- Purdy. Mr. Firstenberger has been an active worker in the business and social life of this place since coming here.

    JUDGE H. G. LORE, farmer and stock-raiser. Section 21. P. O. Cincinnati. Judge Lore is a native of Ohio, where he was reared and educated. In 1850, he removed to Missouri and prosecuted his present industry till 1853 when he removed to Illinois. In 1856, he came here and located, and has been actively identified with his present industry here since. In 1851, he was married in Missouri to Miss Cerelda Kirby, who was born and reared in Andrew County, Mo. They have a family of three sons and one daughter -- John, William, Albert and Amanda. Judge Lore has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality; served as Judge of the Probate Court of Pawnee County, from 1856 till 1865, and has filled many minor officers [sic] of honor and trust in this municipality.

    JOHN P. LORE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 21, P. O. Cincinnati. Mr. Lore was born and reared in Ohio, where he was identified with the teaching profession till 1853, when he removed to Oskaloosa, Ind., and after teaching through the winter term, there, he went to Andrew County, Mo., and was identified with his profession there during the winter and summer term for seven years. In the meantime he came here and located land in 1854, and was connected with the development of his present industry till 1861, when he removed here, and has very successfully conducted the agricultural and stock industry here since, also following his profession for some few years after his removal here. In 1860, he was married to Miss Sarah A. Liggett, who was born and reared in Portsmouth, Ohio. They have a family of two sons and two daughters -- Charles F., Allie, George and Nellie. Mr. Lore has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality, and has served in official capacity almost continuously since coming here.

    LEVI M. WILSEY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 35. P. O. Cincinnati. Mr. Wilsey was born and reared in Broome, N. Y., and identified himself with the mercantile industry there, which he prosecuted actively for several years. In 1858, he came here and located land, and removed here with his family in 1868, and has been actively connected with his present industry here since. In 1862, he was married to Miss Anna C. Hay, who was born and reared in his native place. They have a family of three sons and one daughter -- Frank, Walter S., Mary A. and John W. Mr. Wilsey has been actively connected with the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

BURCHARD.

    This is a new town, founded by the Lincoln Town Site Company in August, 1881. Although so young, Burchard is already quite a brisk little village, having a population of over one hundred. It is situated on the Wymore Division of the Republican Valley road, twelve miles west of Pawnee City. Burchard is the center of a growing trading district. The village contains two general stores, two hardware establishments, one drug and one dry goods store, a Presbyterian and a Methodist Episcopal society, and a good district school. Of course, a town which is not yet two years old has no history, so to speak. But if Burchard continues to take the upward course which has marked her history so far, she will become, in five years, one of the liveliest towns in this section of the State.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

    J. C. & BRO., dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, hats and caps, etc., Burchard. The firm consists of J. C. and A. D. Dort, who came to Nebraska with their people, who located here in 1863, and where they were reared and educated. In 1881, they established the present business here, which they very ably represent.

    JAMES A. COPE, County Commissioner of Pawnee County, farmer and stock-raiser, section 32. P. O. Pawnee City. Mr. Cope was born and reared in Morgan County, Ohio. In 1859, he removed to Wisconsin, where he was identified with the farming industry until 1862, when he enlisted in company E, Twelfth Wisconsin, and remained in active service until the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged. In 1869, he came here and located, and has been actively connected with the agricultural and stock industry since. In 1859, he was married, in Ohio, to Miss Nancy Osborne, who passed away from this life in 1870, and is buried in the cemetery in Pawnee City, leaving one son and one daughter -- Henry and Ida, now Mrs. W. A. Hills, of Pawnee County. In 1813, he married Miss Olive Stevens, who was born in New York State, and who passed away from this life in 1878, and is buried in the cemetery at Pawnee City leaving one daughter -- Jessie. In 1880, he married Miss Elenora Stewart, who was buried in Indiana. Mr. Cope has been a very active worker In the development of the social and public life of his locality since coming here.

    JOHN P. FRY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 24, P. O, Pawnee City, is a native of Tennessee. In 1861, he came to Nebraska and located here, where he has been actively connected with his present industry since. In 1865, he was married to Miss Eliza Kanada, who was born and reared in Iowa. They have a family of three sons and five daughters -- Alonzo, Dora, Ella, Alice, James F., John P., Gracie and Florence.

    CARLOS GILKERSON, of the firm of Gilkerson & Fuller, groceries, queensware, agricultural implements, Burchard. Mr. Gilkerson is a native of Vermont, and came to Nebraska in 1866, and located here, where he was actively engaged at the farming industry till 1878, when he took up the mercantile business, and has successfully conducted it since. In 1872, he was married to Miss Josephine Dusenbery, who was born in New York State. They have a family of two sons and one daughter -- Lottie May, Albert William and Carman Carlos.

    PEPPERL BROS., hardware and agricultural implements, harness-making and saddlery, Burchard. The firm consists or Frank and James Pepperl, natives of Austria, who came to America in 1869 at an early age, and settled in Chicago. In 1874, they came here, Frank following his trade of carpenter, and James that of harness-making, till the present year, when they opened the present business, which they very ably represent.

    THOMAS SMALL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 3, P. O. Pawnee. Mr. Small was born and reared in Ripley County, Ind., and removed to Iowa in 1855, where he followed farming till 1862, when he enlisted in Company K, Twenty -third Iowa Volunteers, and remained in active service till the end of the war; was honorably discharged as Sergeant Major of his regiment, which position he had principally filled during his service. After the war he came here, and has been actively connected with his present industry here since. In 1856, he was married to Miss Eliza Bower, who was born and reared in Pennsylvania, and who passed away from this life in 1864, and is buried in the Green Mountain Cemetery, Marshall County, Iowa, leaving two daughters -- Emma, now Mrs. John Greenwell, of Pawnee City, and Eldora. In 1866, he was married to Mrs. Abbie Walker, formerly Walters, who was born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, and reared in Nebraska. Their family consists of Ira and Minnie Walker and Samuel, Ella and Edward Small. Mr. Small has been an active worker in the social and public life of his locality since coming here.

OTHER POST OFFICES.

    Mission Creek, Steinauer, West Branch, New Home, Tip's Branch and Wolf Creek are other post offices in the county, and centers of a respectable farming trade. At Tip's Branch and Upper and Lower West Branch, the Presbyterians have societies -- preaching by Rev. S. M. Kier.

    A congregation of the United Presbyterians was organized at Mission Creek early in 1873, but there was no settled pastor until April, 1878, when Rev. Marion Morrison took charge. At this time, there were only five regular members. The congregation has now increased to 101, with a flourishing Sabbath school. In 1857, the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions founded a mission school at this point, Rev. David Murdock being placed in charge of it. At one time, fifteen young Otoes were attending school, but it does not appear that the enterprise was a decided success.

    Henry Musfeldt, David Neal and George Tanner were among the earliest settlers near and at Mission Creek, The first settler was a Mr. Bartholomew, who located in 1856.

    For further particulars regarding the early settlement of this and other districts mentioned, the reader is referred to the general county history.

    Rev. Samuel M. Kier has charge of a number of Presbyterian stations throughout the county. The society at Burchard was organized in June, 1881, and now numbers thirty-six members. A neat church edifice is nearly completed. The society at Summit was organized in March, 1872, and now numbers forty members. Five miles northwest of Summit is Upper West Branch, a station considered a part of Summit.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

    JOHN BOWHAY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 17. P. 0. Mission Creek, is a native of Fulton County, Penn. At the age of thirty-two, and in 1852, he removed to Illinois, where he was actively connected with the farming industry till 1874, when he came here and has been successfully connected with his present industry since. He married Miss Mary Ann Peck, who was born and reared in Pennsylvania. They have a family of three sons and one daughter -- Mary, now Mrs. William Friend, of Tulare County, Cal.; Peter, Milton and Elmer.

    L. J. CARPENTER, stock-raiser, Section 29, Mission Creek, Pawnee County, Neb., was born in Franklin County, Ohio, and reared in Lafayette County, Wis., where he carried on the agricultural and stock industry until 1876, when he came here and has been actively connected with the same industry here since, making, however, as a specialty the introduction of breeding of thoroughbred runners, Ethan Allen trotting stock and imported draft horses, of which his stable shows a nice variety. His family consists of one daughter, married, Lorinda P., now Mrs. Peter Bowhay; Lucien L. and Lura Myrtle. He was married in 1856, to Miss Parmelia E. Howe, who was born in Morrow County, Ohio, and reared in La Fayette County, Wis.

    CYRUS CLARK, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 31, P. 0. Mission Creek, was born and reared in Ripley County, Ind., and came here in 1866, where he has been actively connected with the present industry since. In 1867, he was married to Miss Emma McKee, who was born and reared in his native county. They have a family of three sons and five daughters -- Mary J., Ulysses S., Charlotte, Effie, Maggie, Bertha, Charles and Henry. Mr. Clark is one of the active pioneer men of his precinct.

    THOMAS CLARK, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 31, P. O. Mission Creek, was born on the Island of St. Helena, January 21, 1813; came to America, in 1820, with his people, who settled in Indiana, where he was identified with milling till 1866, when he came here and located, and has actively prosecuted his present industry since. In 1839, he was married to Miss Jane Small, who was born in Kent County, Eng., in 1816. They have a family of three sons and seven daughters -- Sarah Jane, now Mrs. Joseph Anderson of Marshall County, Kan.; Naomi, now Mrs. A. F. Manly, of Pawnee county; Sophia M., now Mrs. Charles Cruse, of Furnas County, Neb.; Cyrus; Hannah, now Mrs. Otto Uter, of Pawnee County; Ellen, now Mrs. La Fayette Nelson, of Gage County, Neb.; Mary, now Mrs. Joseph Winter, of Marshall County, Kan.; Thomas Fremont, Henry A. and Addie M. Mr. Clark has always been a very active worker in the social life of his locality.

    JOHN CONARD, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 31, P. O. Mission Creek. He is a native of Franklin County, Ind., where he was connected with the farming industry until 1863, when he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and remained in active service until the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged. In 1867, he came here and engaged in his present industry, which he has very successfully conducted since. He was married in 1869 to Miss Elizabeth Winter, who was born and reared in Indiana. They have a family of one son and three daughters -- Joseph B., Clara B. Jessie F. and Myrta Z.

    A. F. MANLY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 32, P. O. Mission Creek. Mr. M was born and reared in Ripley County, Ind., and came to this locality in 1866, where he has been prominently identified with his present industry since. In 1861, he was married to Miss Naomi Clark, who was born and reared in his native county. Their family are -- Elmer E., Lillian J., Francis E., Charles H., Thomas Edward, Arthur C. and A. Floyd. Mr. M. did service for his State in Company G, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, from 1862 to the end of the war, when he received an honorable discharge. Since coming here, he has been an active worker in the public and social life of his locality.

    C. P. MILLER, merchant, Grange Store, Mission Creek, is a native of Clinton County, Ind., and came to Nebraska in 1867, and located here, where he has been actively connected with the agricultural and stock industry of the locality since, in the meantime taking up the present business in 1881. In 1874, he married Miss P. A. Stout, of Stephenson County, Ill. Their family are -- Clara Zadie and F. Orris. Mr. M. enlisted in the service of his State at the age of nineteen years, in 1861, in Company C, Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and, after a three months' service, he re-enlisted in the Tenth Battery, and remained in active service until about the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged. He was married to his first wife in Illinois, Miss S. K. Timmons, of Indiana, who passed away from this life in 1871, and is buried in the Tanner Cemetery here. Mr. M. has been an active worker in the development of the social and business life of his locality since coming here.

    HARVEY OWEN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 8, P. O. Liberty. Mr. Owen was born in Lee County, Va., in 1839, and was reared in Kentucky. In 1855, he removed to Illinois, where he followed the farming industry till 1872, when he came here and has been actively connected with his present industry here since, in the meantime taking an active interest in the rearing of fine-bred stock and hogs. In 1861, he was married to Miss Catherine Hannah, who was born and reared in Peoria County, Ill. They have a family of four sons and four daughters -- Hannah, George D., Edgar, Sarah Annie, Loyd, Clara M., Ida M. and Ervin. Mr. Owen enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and remained in active service till 1862, when he was honorably discharged on account of ill-health. Since coming here he has been an active worker in the development of the social life in his locality.

    J. B. TRAIN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 34. P. O. Mission Creek, was born and reared in Essex County, N.Y., and removed to Stephenson County, Ill., where he was identified with farming until 1862, when he enlisted in Company G, Ninety-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and remained in active service until the battle of Chickamauga, where he was wounded, and remained in the hospital until the close of the war, when he was honorably discharged and pensioned. In 1869, he came to Nebraska, and located here, where he has been actively connected with his present industry since. In 1860, he was married to Miss Catharine M. Stout, who was born in Pennsylvania and reared in Stephenson County, Ill. They have a family of five sons and one daughter -- John A., George F., Cora A., Thomas A., Willard F. and Charles J. Mr. Train has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

    M. K. WALKER, merchant and Postmaster, Mission Creek, was born in Pennsylvania and reared and educated in Scott County, Iowa. In 1862, and at the age of twenty-one, he enlisted in Company D, Twentieth Iowa Volunteers; remained in active service until the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged. After the war, he engaged in various industries, prominent among which was mercantile and railway interests until, in 1874, he came here and began his present business, which he has successfully conducted since, in the meantime prosecuting the breeding of the Short-Horned cattle, which he introduced in 1878. In 1874, he was married in Ashland, Ohio, to Miss Elizabeth J. Sloan, who was born in Pennsylvania and reared in Ohio. Mr. Walker has been an active worker in the development of the agricultural and stock industries of his county since coming here; is President of the Agricultural and Mechanical Society of Pawnee County.

CLAY PRECINCT.

    L. D. JORDAN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 2, P. O. Pawnee City, was born and reared in Maine. At the age of nineteen he came West; began work upon the railroad, where transportation in that industry stopped, in Michigan. After a few years' work in that industry, he reached Rock Island, the Western terminus of the railroad industry then. He then came to Nebraska, in 1855, and began a pioneer life here which he very successfully carried through, being very instrumental in the development of the many industries in his locality. In 1869, he was married to Miss Florence Wallbridge, who was born and reared in Erie County, Penn. They have a family of five daughters and one son -- Phila, Mina D., Ruthie, Sadie, Bessie and L. D. Mr. Jordan has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

    JACOB W. MOORE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 3, P. O. Pawnee City. Mr. Moore was born and reared in Erie County, Penn., where he was identified with the farming industry till the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and remained in active service till 1864. He was in every battle of the regiment, which consisted of thirty pitched battles, besides numerous skirmishes; was wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, August 29, 1862, but recovered sufficiently to join his regiment in time of each subsequent battle. In September, 1864, he was honorably discharged and pensioned. After his war services, he came here, in 1865, having previously located land here in 1859, and has been actively connected with his present industry since. In 1866, he was appointed Overseer of the property at the reserve of the Otoe Indians, and remained in that capacity till 1868, and has been an official servant for the people of his county and municipality the principal part of his time here. In 1861, he was married in Pennsylvania to Miss Emma J. Wallbridge, who was born and reared in his native county. They have a family of five daughters -- Clara J., Vinnie E., Angie L., Kate and Lucia.

    W. F. SAWYER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 23, P. O. Pawnee City. Mr. Sawyer was born and reared in Caledonia County, Vt., where he was identified with the farming industry and hotel business. In 1870, he came here and located, and has been actively connected with the agricultural and stock industry of the locality since. In 1851, he was married to Miss Elvira Pike, in Vermont, who passed away from this life in 1861, and is buried in the Marshfield Cemetery, Washington County, Vt. Two sons, Uriah B. and John B., survive her. In 1872, he was married to Miss H. V. Burge, who was born and reared in Paulding County, Ohio, and who passed away from this life in February, 1882, and is buried in the Rogers Cemetery, Pawnee Co., Neb., leaving a family of two sons and one daughter -- Bertram H., Nellie V. and Calvin J. Mr. Sawyer has been an active worker in the social and public life of his locality since coming here.

    S. S. SHANNON, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 15. P. O. Pawnee City. Mr. Shannon was born in Virginia in 1832, and was reared in Hendricks County, Ind. In August, 1858, he came here and located, and has been actively connected with the agricultural and stock industry of this locality since. In 1856, he was married in Indiana, to Miss Mary M. Jones, who was born and reared in Hendricks County, Ind. They have a family of two sons and two daughters -- Sarah M., now Mrs. C. G. Button, of Pawnee County; Ollie B., now Mrs. Olin Frasier, of Springfield, Ohio; Charles W. and William. Mr. Shannon has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

SHERIDAN PRECINCT.

    CHARLES DORT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 29, Town 2, Range 12, P. O. Pawnee City. Mr. Dort is a native of Allegany County, N. Y., and removed to Wisconsin in 1854, where he was connected with his present industry until 1863, when he came here, locate, and has been actively connected with farming and stock-raising since. In 1856, he was married in New York to Miss Addie C. Pattyson, of his native county. They have a family of three sons and two daughters -- John C. and Albert D., merchants of Burchard; Roxey, now Mrs. Elliot Hendrix, of Pawnee County; Joseph B. and Cora. Mr. Dort has been an active worker in the social development of his locality since coming here. He has been a member of, and Steward in, the Methodist church for the past thirteen years.

    THEODORE DORT, farmer and stock-raiser. Section 33, P. 0. Pawnee City, was born and reared in New York state, and came to Nebraska in 1864, locating here where he has been prominently connected with the agricultural and stock industry of the locality since. In 1882, he was married to Miss Edith F. Sears, who was born and reared in his native State. Mr. D. is an active worker in the development of the industry in this locality.

    FRANK L. JAEKE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 32, P. O. Pawnee. Mr. Jaeke was born in Prussia, in 1833, and came to America, in 1847, and settled in Wisconsin, where he remained, connected with the farming industry till 1868, when he came here and located and has been actively engaged at the agricultural and stock industry of the locality since. In 1866, he was married to his present wife, who was Miss Cornelia Fish, a native of New York State. His family consists of two sons and four daughters -- Carl H. J.; Augusta C., now Mrs. Rollin Buckman, of Pawnee City; Dorothea M., Bessie M., Arthur L. and Alice G. Mr. Jaeke has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

WEST BRANCH PRECINCT.

    ANDROE SCOTT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 21, P. O. Pawnee. Mr. Scott was born in Roxburyshire, Scotland, in 1842, and came to America, in 1859, with his people, who located here, where he has been actively engaged at his present industry since. In 1870, he was married to Miss Julia A. Burg, who was born and reared in Indiana. They have a family of two sons and one daughter -- William B., Francis H. and Dulcina. Mr. Scott served in the Second Nebraska Regiment, from its organization till the close of the war, when he was mustered out and honorably discharged. He has been an active worker in the development of the social life in his locality.

    WILLIAM SMITH, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 22, P. O. Pawnee City, Mr. Smith was born in Roxburyshire, Scotland, in 1834, and came to America in 1853, and settled in Stark County, Ill., where he remained connected with his present industry till 1866, when he came here and located. In 1852, he was married in Scotland to Miss Mary Renwick, who was born in his native county in 1828. They have a family of four sons and four daughters -- William H., Janet W., John T., Thomas M., Agnes G., Mary I., Robert A. and Christina R. (adopted) who is married to Mr. Thomas G. Turnbull, of Pawnee County. Mr. Smith has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.

PLUM CREEK PRECINCT.

    CORNELIUS DUSENBERY, farmer and stock raiser, Section 25, P. O. Burchard. Mr. Dusenbery was born and reared in New York State. In 1847, he removed to Ogle County, Ill., where he remained in connection with his present industry till 1869, when he came here, and has very successfully carried it on here since. He was married in 1838, to Miss Ann E. Overacker, who was born in New York State. They have a family of five sons and two daughters -- Albert A., Charles W., David S., Beecher, Judson, Josephine, now Mrs. Carlos Gilkerson, of Burchard, and Charlotte. Charles W. is buried in Flagg Center Cemetery, Olge County, Ill. Mr. Dusenbery has been an active worker in the development of the social life of his locality since coming here.




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County Index




Index of Illustrations in Pawnee County Chapter
  1. [Gov. David Butler's farm and residence.]
  2. [Portrait of David Butler.]
  3. [Portrait of J. L. Edwards.]
  4. [Panorama view of Pawnee City.]
  5. [C. T. Edee & Co. Bank.]