KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS
Kansas Exhibits at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition



light yellow divider
Page (9)


Portraits and Pictures.
__________


     THE portraits and pictures in the exhibit are selected from those which have been collected in the State Historical Society since its organization, with a few others placed in the exhibit in order to complete certain groups. Some other pictures, in albums, are in the Society's cases in the Kansas World's Fair educational exhibit.

     1. CHIEF JUSTICE SAMUEL A. KINGMAN was born in Massachusetts, in 1818. He lived many years in Kentucky; settled in Kansas in 1857, in Brown country. In 1859 he was a member of a commission to audit claims for losses growing out of the troubles in Kansas, and the same year was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention, which framed the state constitution. He was associate justice of the supreme court from 1861 to 1864, and chief justice from 1866 to 1877, when he resigned. He has for many years resided at Topeka. He was the first president of the Kansas State Historical Society, and has always been a member of its board of directors.

     2. The western brand of the NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED VOLUNTEER SOLDIERS, near Leavenworth, was established in October, 1885. In May, 1893, there were 1,965 inmates.

     3. GOV. JOHN W. GEARY was born in Pennsylvania, in 1819. He was a soldier in the Mexican war; was first alcalde and first mayor of San Francisco, Cal.; was governor of Kansas Territory by appointment of President Buchanan from September, 1856, to March, 1857, when resigned; was a brigadier general in the union army during the war of the rebellion, and was promoted to brevet major general in 1865. He was governor of Pennsylvania from 1867 to 1873. He died at Harrisburg, in 1873.

     4. PROF. ISAAC T. GOODNOW was born in Vermont, in 1814. He was for 20 years engaged in educational work in New England, before coming to Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1855; was one of the founders of the city of Manhattan, and of the State Agricultural College. He was state superintendent of public instruction for two terms, 1863 to 1867. He still resides at Manhattan.

     5. SOLDIERS' HOME. See No. 2.

     6. GOV. ANDREW H. REEDER was born in Pennsylvanis, in 1807. He was the first governor of Kansas Territory, by appointment of President Pierce, and served from October, 1854, to August, 1855. He afterwards became prominently identified with the free-state movement in Kansas; was a candidate for delegate to Congress, and contested the election of John W. Whitfield as a member of that body. In 1861, he was appointed by President Lincoln as brigadier general in the union army, but declined the office. He died at his home, in Easton, Pa., July 5, 1864.

     7. COL. JOHN C. VAUGHAN was born in South Carolina, in 1806; came north because of his anti-slavery views; was editor of various newspapers in Ohio and Kentucky, and, on the founding of the Chicago Tribune, became one of its editors. While in Cleveland, Ohio, as editor of the


light yellow divider
Page (10)


Leader, he was associated with others in the movement which led to the organization of the republican party. He came to Kansas in 1857; became one of the editors of the Leavenworth Times; and afterwards held various public postions --- was member of the state legislature in 1875. He died at Cincinnati, in September, 1892. The Kansas Historical Society's portrait was contributed through means provided by Hon. Joseph Medill, at the solicitation of the abiding friend of Colonel Vaughan, Samuel Bernstein, of Cincinnati.

     8. GOV. WILSON SHANNON was born in Ohio, in 1802. He was governor of Ohio in 1838 and 1839; was United States minister to Mexico in 1844 and 1845; a member of Congress from Ohio in 1853 and 1856. He continued to reside in Kansas until his death, at his home in Lawrence, in 1877.

     9. DR. FRANKLIN L. CRANE was a native of Connecticut. He came to Kansas from Pennsylvania, in 1854, became one of the founders of Topeka that year, and was one of the chief promoters of all its public enterprises, and especially of those measures which led to its becoming the capital of the State. He died in 1884.

     10. GOV. CHARLES ROBINSON was born in Massachusetts. He was educated for a physician. He was a pioneer in California in 1841, and was elected to the legislature of that state in 1850. Returning to Massachusetts, he became a Kansas pioneer in 1854, and was the principal agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company in establishing settlements in Kansas. He was one of the founders of Lawrence and of the State University. He was elected governor of Kansas, under the Topeka constitution, in 1855, and became the first governor of the state, in 1861. He has been many times a member of the legislature, and has held other important public positions. He has always been prominent in the State Historical Society, as a member of the board of directors and as president. He is now a member of the board of regents of the State University.

     11. COL. CYRUS K. HOLLIDAY is a native of Pennsylvania. He came to Kansas in 1854, and became one of the founders of Topeka. He has been president of the Topeka Town Company from its organization. He was a principal promoter of the building of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, and has always been a prominent member of the board of directors of the company. He was lieutenant governor under the Topeka constitution, has been a state senator, member of the house of representatives, and adjutant general of the state. He is a life member of the Kansas State Historical Society, has always been a member of its board of directors, and has been president of the Society. He has held many other positions of honor and trust. Topeka has always been his home in Kansas.

     12. GOV. THOMAS CARNEY was born in Ohio, in 1827. He became a citizen of Leavenworth, Kas., in 1858, and a member of the state legislature in 1862, and was governor of the state in 1863 and 1864. He died at Leavenworth, July 30, 1888.

     13. JOHN A. ANDERSON was born in Pennsylvania, in 1834. He was educated for the ministry, and preached in Stockton, Cal., from 1857 to 1862. He became chaplain of the third California infantry in 1862, and was afterwards connected with the United States Sanitary Commission. He held other public offices growing out of the war. He came to Kansas in 1868, and became president of the State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, in 1873. He was a member of Congress from the first and fifth districts in Kansas from 1879 to 1891. He died in Liverpool, Eng., May 17, 1892.

     14. GOV. SAMUEL J. CRAWFORD was born in Indiana in 1835; was educated as a lawyer, and came to Kansas in 1858, residing at Garnett, Anderson county. He entered the army as a captain in the second


light yellow divider
Page (11)


regiment, Kansas volunteer infantry, in 1861, and became distinguished for bravery and activity in the union cause. While yet in the army he was elected governor of Kansas. He served two terms, from 1865 to 1868. In November, 1868, he resigned the office of Governor, and took command of the nineteenth regiment of volunteers, raised for the defense of the frontier against Indians, in the campaign under the command of General Sheridan, which resulted in quieting the troubles on the border. In March, 1877, Governor Crawford was appointed agent for the State in the prosecution of claims against the United States Government, in which office he has been eminently successful. His residence has for many years been at Topeka.

     15. GEN. WILLIAM T. SHERMAN was, in 1859, for a few months, a resident of Leavenworth, Kas., and, for a brief period, of Shawnee county, near Topeka. He always took a great interest in the growth and development of Kansas. He was born in Ohio, in 1820, and died in New York city, February 14, 1891.

     16. GEN. JOHN A. HALDERMAN was born in Missouri, in 1833. He came to Kansas in 1854; was private secretary of Governor Reeder; secretary of the first territorial council, in 1855; probate judge of Leavenworth county; major of the first regiment Kansas volunteers, in 1861, afterwards provost marshal general and major general of Kansas state forces; mayor of Leavenworth; member of the house of representatives, and state senate; regent of the State University; consul general to Bangkok in 1880, and was promoted to the post of United States minister to Siam in 1882, which position he resigned in 1885, having been five years in the diplomatic service. He is a life member of the State Historical Society. His residence is in Washington, D. C.

     17. GOV. ROBERT J. WALKER was, by appointment of President Buchanan, governor of Kansas Territory from May, 1857, to December, 1857. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1801, became a citizen of Mississippi, and represented that State in the United States Senate from 1837 to 1845, when he became secretary of the treasury, under President Polk, serving until 1859. He died in Washington, in 1869.

     18. PRESTON B. PLUMB came from his native state, Ohio, to Kansas when but 19 years of age, in 1856. He was one of the founders of the town of Emporia, in 1857. He was a printer, and, the same year, established the Emporia News. He was a member of the house of representatives in 1861, became lieutenant colonel of the eleventh Kansas regiment in 1862, and served with distinction through the war. He was afterwards a members of the legislature for several terms. He was elected United States senator in January, 1877, and served until his death, in Washington, December 21, 1891, earning a national reputation as a patriotic statesman of great ability. His home was Emporia.

     19. GOV. NEHEMIAH GREEN settled in Douglas county, Kansas, in 1855, served through the war in an Ohio regiment, returned to Kansas as a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church in 1865, was elected lieutenant governor in 1866, and, on the resignation of Governor Crawford, in November, 1868, became governor for the unexpired portion of the term, ending January, 1869. Governor Green died at Manhattan, January 12, 1890.

     20. BENJ. F. STRINGFELLOW was born in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1816, and was educated at the University of Virginia. He took up his residence in Missouri, in 1838, where he became a prominent lawyer, attorney general of the state, and a member of the legislature. On the opening of Kansas to settlement, he became prominently connected with the slavery struggle. He favored the introduction of slavery into Kansas as a safeguard to slavery in Missouri, having became attached to the institution by education and


light yellow divider
Page (12)


and lifelong association with it. Northern emigration having settled the question in favor of freedom, he promptly submitted to the majority and became one of the most useful of the citizens of Kansas. He was prominent in developing the railroad systems of the state, and was long a director of and attorney for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company. He was for a long time a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society.

     21. ALEXANDER CALDWELL was born in Pennsylvania, in 1830. In 1845, at the age of 17, he went as a soldier to the Mexican war. In 1861, he became a resident of Leavenworth, Kas. He became prominent in railroad and other business enterprises, and 1871 was elected United States senator, but resigned to give his attention to business interests, with which he is still largely concerned.

     22. GOV. JAMES M. HARVEY was born in Virginia in 1835, and became a resident of Kansas in 1859. He was a captain in the fourth and tenth consolidated regiments, Kansas volunteers, during the war of the rebellion; was a member of the Kansas house in 1865, and again in 1866, and state senator in 1867-'68, and was governor of the state for two terms, 1869-'72, and United States senator from 1874 to 1877. His home is in Riley county, Kansas.

     23. HON. JOHN JAMES INGALLS was born in Massachusetts, in 1833, and is a lawyer by profession. He settled in Kansas in 1858; was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859, secretary of the territorial council in 1860, secretary of the state senate in 1861, member of the state senate in 1862; was elected to the U. S. senate in 1873, and served three terms, being succeeded by William A. Peffer, in 1891. He was a leading member of the senate, and for many years president of that body. He has a national reputation as a lecturer and writer.

     24. THOMAS A. OSBORN was born in Pennsylvania, in 1836; came to Kansas in 1857; was a member of the first state senate, 1861; was lieutenant governor of the state in 1863-'64; was United States marshal for Kansas from 1864 to 1867; was governor of the state for two terms, 1873-'77; was United Sates minister to Chili from 1877 to 1881, and minister to Brazil from 1881 to 1885. He was a member of the state senate from 1889 to 1892. His home is in Topeka. He has been president of the State Historical Society, and has long been a member of its board of directors.

     25. GEORGE T. ANTHONY was born in the State of New York, in 1824. He served as captain of the seventeenth New York independent battery during the war of the rebellion, and was promoted to the rank of major by brevet, at the close of the war. He came to Kansas in 1865; was collector of internal revenue for Kansas in 1868; was president of the State Board of Agriculture for three years, and president of the Kansas board of Centennial managers, 1876. He was governor of the state in 1877-'78, and a member of the State Board of Railroad Commissioners from 1889 to 1893. He resides in Ottawa.

     26. GOV. JOHN P. ST. JOHN was born in Indiana, in 1833; was lieutenant colonel of the 143d Illinois regiment in the war of the rebellion; became a resident of Kansas in 1869; was a state senator in 1873-'74, and was governor of the State for two terms, 1879-'82. He is a lawyer, and has won a national reputation as an eloquent temperance lecturer and advocate of prohibition. His home is in Olathe, Kas.

     27. PRESTON B. PLUMB. See No. 18.

     28. GOV. GEORGE W. GLICK was born in Ohio, in 1827; came to Kansas in 1858; was a member of the Kansas house of representatives for seven terms, 1863-'81 [sic], and a member of the state senate in 1876, and was a member of the Kansas board of Centennial managers at Philadelphia, in 1876. He was governor of the state in 1883-'84. He was United States


light yellow divider
Page (13)


pension agent at Topeka from 1886 to 1889. He is a member of the Kansas board of managers of the World's Fair, 1893, by appointment of Governor Lewelling. Governor Glick, in Kansas, has always resided in Atchison. He is a lawyer, and has always been a democrat. He is a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society.

     29. ALBERT H. HORTON was born in the state of New York, in 1837; came to Kansas in 1860; was elected city attorney of Atchison in 1861; became judge of the second Kansas judicial district in the same year; was United States district attorney for Kansas from 1869 to 1873; member of the house of representatives in 1873, and was elected to the state senate in 1876, and has been chief justice of the state since December 31, 1876. He has been a republican presidential elector and delegate to the republican national convention. He is a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society. His residence in Kansas was at Atchison until his official duties required his constant presence at the state capital.

     30. JOHN A. MARTIN was born in Pennsylvania, in 1839, came to Kansas in 1857; was secretary of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859; was a state senator in 1861, and the same year became lieutenant colonel of the eighth regiment, Kansas volunteers, and was afterwards colonel of the same regiement, serving with distinction through the war. He was governor of the state for two terms, 1885-'89. Governor Martin held many places of honor and trust besides those mentioned, among them, postmaster at Atchison, vice president of the Kansas board of Centennial managers, 1876, commander of the state encampment, Grand Army of the Republic, member of the republican national convention, of the republican national committee, president and treasurer of the State Historical Society, and, at the time of his death, vice president of the board of managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Solidiers. He was one of the lead- ing editors of the state; always resided at Atchison, and was always a republican. He died at his home in Atchison, October 2, 1889.

     31. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, 1857-'58. The legislature of Kansas Territory consisted of two bodies, a council, elected biennially, and a house of representatives, elected annually. The first council and the first house of representatives, 1855-'57, were pro-slavery. In 1857, the second council and the third house of representatives were elected by the free-state party. The picture groups, Nos. 31 and 33, contain the portraits of the members of this free-state legislature. Col. C. K. Holliday, whose portrait is numbered 11 in this collection, was a member of that legislative council.

     33. GOV. LYMAN U. HUMPHREY was born in Ohio, in 1844. During the war of the rebellion he was a captain in the seventy-sixth regiment, Ohio infantry, and served through the war with distinction. He came to Kansas in 1871; was a member of the house of representatives in 1877, lieutenant governor from 1878 to 1881, state senator from 1885 to 1889, and governor of the state for two terms, 1889-'93. He is a lwayer, and his residence is in Independence, Kas.

     33. LEGISLATURE. House, 1857-'58. See No. 31.

     34. GOV. LORENZO D. LEWELLING, the present governor of Kansas, was born in Ohio, in 1846. Though too young for enlistment in the army, he was in the service with the army in bridge building during a considerable portion of the war. He became an educator; was superintendent of the Reform School for Girls in the state of Iowa for a number of years; and for 14 years a member of the board of directors of the Iowa State Normal School, and was president of the board when he resigned to take up his residence in Wichita, Kas, in 1887. In 1883, he represented the state


light yellow divider
Page (14)


of Iowa in the national conference of charities, held at Louisville, Ky. He became the candidate of the people's party for governor of Kansas, in 1892, and was elected, taking his seat in January, 1893, for the term of two years. He is a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society, and of its executive committee.?

     35. The monogram shows the members of the senate and House of representatives in the legislature of the state of Kansas for the session which met in January, 1893.

     36. The monogram contains the portaits of the press reporters of the legislature of 1879, namely: (1) J. L. King, Atchison Daily Champion; (2) William H. Hess, Topeka Commonwealth; (3) C. C. Baker, Topeka Commonwealth; (4) J. G. Pangborn, Kansas City Times; (5) A. R. Greene, Kansas City Journal.

     37. The monogram contains the portraits of the newspaper reporters in the house of representatives for 1891, namely: (1)Walter Costigan, (2) R. H. Lindsey, (3) W. A. Evans, (4) C. Borin, (5) J. C. Malone, (6) W. E. Bolton, (7) W. H. T. Wakefield, (8) H. Vincent, (9) Arthur Capper, (1) Victor Murdock, (11) J. C. Hebbard, (12) H. S. Huston.

     38. SENATOR WILLIAM A. PEFFER was born in Pennsylvania, in 1831; served three years during the war of the rebellion in the 83d Illinois regiement; came to Kansas in 1870; was elected state senator for Wilson and Montgomery counties in 1874; and was a republican presidential elector in 1876. He was elected United States senator in January, 1891, for the full term of six years, to succeed Hon. John J. Ingalls. He is a lawyer and an editor. He was for many years editor of the Kansas Farmer. He is the author of a volume entitled "The Farmer's Side; his Troubles, and their Remedy," and has written in the interest of labor. His home is in Topeka.

     39. The monogram contains the portraits of the senate reporters of 1887, namely: (1) Milton W. Reynolds, Kansas City Times; (2) Geo. H. Apperson, Kansas City Journal; (3) Leroy A. Wright, Kansas State Journal, Topeka; (4) Salmon S. Prouty, Topeka, Commonwealth; (5) Horace J. Newberry, Topeka Capital.

     40. The monogram contains the portraits of the senate reporters of 1891, namely; Paul Hudson, J. Ware Butterfield, H. W. Huttman, and J. W. Stailey.

     41. COL. RICHARD J. HINTON was born in London, Eng., in 1830. Coming to this country in 1851 he became a printer, reporter, editor, publisher, and author. He came to Kansas in 1856, to help in the slavery struggle, on the free-state side, and as a correspondent of eastern newspapers, and continued in the latter work in Kansas for many years, writing for many of the leading papers of the country. He has since been an editorial writer for papers in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, and Kansas. Of books, he has written, "Campaign Lives" of Seward and Lincoln, "The Army of the Border," "Price's Raid in Kansas," 1864, "English Radical Leaders," 1864, and a "Handbook of Arizona," 1879. He was official reporter of the Wyandotte constitutional convention, in 1859, and of the impeachment trial of 1862; was a lieutenant, adjutant, captain and brevet lieutenant colonel in the union army, commissioner of immigration in Europe, 1857; inspector of United States consulates in Europe, and special agent at Vienna in 1873; treasury agent for Mexico, 1883; irrigation engineer, United States geographical survey, 1889-'90; and special agent of the Department of Agriculture, 1890-'92, in the western artesian underflow investigation and irrigation inquiry. He has written and edited many volumes of reports on irrigation. He is a member of the American Society of Irrigation Engineers, an honorary member of the Kansas State Historical Society, and many scientific and other societies in Europe and in the United States.


light yellow divider
Page (15)


     42. The monogram contains the portraits of the 115 members of the Kansas conference of the Kansas Methodist Episcopal church, which held its session at Junction City in March, 1887.

     43. The monogram contains the portraits of the city editors of the Topeka daily newspapers in 1886, namely: Richard J. Colver, L. A. Wright, C. K. Holliday, Arthur Capper, George M. Clark, J. L. Thornton, G. M. Ewing, C. E. McIntosh, and A. J. McCabe.

     44. MRS. MARGARET NORTHRUP's certificate shows that Mrs. Northrup, in 1857, contributed the sum of $1,000 to the building fund of the Metropolitan Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, at Washington, D. C., to secure a pew in the church forever to the citizens of Kansas. Among the signatures to the certificate as trustees are those of President U. S. Grant and Chief Justice S. P. Chase. Mrs. Northrup was the wife of Hiram M. Northrup, who was an early pioneer in Wyandotte, Kas. He was for many years an honored and useful member of the Kansas State Historical Society. He died at his home in Kansas City, Kas., in 1893.

     45. RICHARD REALF was born in England, in 1834; came to the United States in 1854, Kas. He was associated with John Brown; served in the eighty-eighth regiment, Illinois volunteers, through the war; died in Oakland, Cal., in 1878. He was a writer of poetry; was a journalist and lecturer. Many of his poems possess enduring merit.

     46. ORVILLE C. BROWN was, more than any other person, the founder of Osawatomie, Kas. He was the president of the company which located the town and caused its survey to be made, in February, 1855. He was one of the principal sufferers from the repeated raids upon the town by the pro-slavery party, in 1856. He remained a prominent citizen of Kansas until 1861. He now lives (1893), at the age of 82, at Adams, Jefferson county, New York.

     47. SPENCER KELLOGG BROWN was born in the State of New York, in 1842. He was a son of Orville C. Brown, of Osawatomie, Kas. At the sacking of Osawatomie, August 30, 1856, young Brown, then a lad, was taken to Missouri by the pro-slavery party and held for weeks as a prisioner. At the opening of the war, he enlisted in the union army, was employed in scouting service, was eventually taken prisoner, and was confined in confederate prisons in Mississippi and at Richmond, Va. At the latter place he was tried and convicted, and in September, 1863, executed as a spy. His father always maintained the belief that the acts of his son were simply those of duty in the hazardous scouting service in which he was employed.

     48. EDWARD P. McCABE was born in Troy, N. Y., in 1850. He settled in Graham county, Kansas, in 1878, and became county clerk of that county. He was elected by the republican party as auditor of state, in 1882, and reelected in 1884, serving two terms, 1883-'87.

     49. GEORGE LUTHER STEARNS was born in Medford, Mass., in 1809. He was a successful merchant. He became identified with, and contributed large sums of money to promote the free-state cause in Kansas, and especially the measures of John Brown, in 1856 and 1857. During the war he took great interest in the enlistment of colored troops, and the fifty-fourth and fifty-fifth Massachusetts regiments and the fifth United States cavalry were largely recruited through his instrumentality. He bore the rank of major in the army by recommendation of Secretary Stanton. He died in New York, in 1867. His widow, Mrs. Mary E. Stearns, has been a munificent contributor to the library and collections of the Kansas State Historical Society.

     50. The picture shows a group of state officers and employes at the


light yellow divider
Page (16)


state capitol, Topeka, taken in 1888, with Gov. John A. Martin standing prominently in the foreground.

     52. THE KANSAS STATE REFORM SCHOOL, for boys, at Topeka, was established in 1881. Over 500 boys have passed through the school and been honorably discharged. The building has accommodations for 220 pupils. The estimated value of the property is $152,000.

     53. HON. CHESTER THOMAS was born in Pennsylvania, in 1810. He came to Kansas in 1858, and took up his residence at Topeka. He was a member of the territorial council in 1860. He was a quartermaster during the war, and was a republican presidentaial elector in 1864. He died in Topeka, April 1, 1891.

     54. The first house in Topeka. See No. 55.

     55. The picture contains the portraits of seven of the first settlers in Topeka, namely: James A. Hickey, Enoch Chase, Daniel H. Horne, Frye W. Giles, L. C. Wilmarth, ____ Rigdon, and C. K. Holliday. They were among the first occupants, during the winter of 1854 and 1855, of the first house in Topeka, represented in the picture numbered 54. The picture is the property of Mr. Giles.

     56. GEN. JAMES H. LANE was born in Indiana, in 1814. He was a settler in Kansas in 1855, taking up his residence at Lawrence. He was a lawyer. He had been a colonel in the war with Mexico, lieutenant governor of Indiana, and a member of Congress from that state. In 1856, he was elected United States senator, under the Topeka constitution, but did not gain his seat. In 1857, he was president of the Leavenworth constitutional convention. In 1861, he was elected to the United States senate, and reelected in 1865 and served until his death, in July, 1866. He was always prominent and very active in Kansas affairs, and very influential in the United States senate and in army matters, in promoting the interests of the union cause during the war of the rebellion.

     57. REV. PARDEE BUTLER was born in the state of New York, in 1816, and his family removed to Ohio in 1819. He was educated, in part, at Bethany College, Virginia, under Alexander Campbell. He became a clergy- man of the Christian Baptist church, of which Mr. Campbell was the founder. He settled in Atchison county, Kansas, in 1855. His outspoken free-state sentiments led to his violent persecution by the pro-slavery party at Atchison, and he was at one time, after being otherwise shame- fully maltreated, set adrift on a raft on the Missouri river. He lived to see Kansas a free state, and slavery abolished. He was always a most highly-respected and useful citizen of Kansas. He died October 19, 1888.

     58. This portrait of John Brown was painted by Selden J. Woodman, from a photograph belonging to the Webb collection in the libary of the Kansas State Historical Society. The portrait exhibits expressive features, which are, in a measure, concealed in the portraiture of Captain Brown with the full beard. Portrait No. 62, by Ruggles, was painted from the same photograph. Many citizens of Kansas who remember John Brown as he appeared in the stirring events of August and September, 1856, recognize the portrait without the beard as far the most satisfactory.

     59. This is an engraved portrait of CAPT. JOHN BROWN, by Sartain.

     60. The men whose portraits are shown in the picture were citizens of Lawrence, Kas., and vicinity, who proceeded, in July 1859, from Lawrence by wagon to St. Joseph, Mo., and crossed the Missouri river in the night-time, and by artifice deluded the keeper of the jail so as to gain admission inside. They then, by intimidation, silenced the jailer, and brought from the prison, across the Missouri river to Kansas,


light yellow divider
Page (17)


Dr. John Doy, who had been imprisoned on the charge of kidnapping slaves from Missouri into Kansas. The party reached Lawrence in safety, and there the picture, of which is a copy, was taken, amid the plaudits of the populace. No effort was made for the reimprisonment of Doctor Doy, nor were his rescuers molested. The names of the resuers were: Maj. James B. Abbott, captain of the party; Silas S. Soule, J. A. Pike, S. J. Willes, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, Charles Doy, Jacob Sinex, John E. Stewart, and George Hay.

     61. BARCLAY COPPIC was born at Salem, Ohio, in 1839; removed to Iowa, and came to Kansas in 1856, and took part in the slavery struggle. He was with Capt. John Brown in the Harper's Ferry raid, October 16, 1859, and escaped. He became a lieutenant in Colonel Mongomery's third Kansas Regiment in 1861, and, returning from recruiting service in Iowa, he was killed at the Platte river bridge massacre, September 3, 1861. He was given a military burial at Leavenworth on the 6th of September.

     62. Portrait of CAPT. JOHN BROWN, by Q. E. Ruggles. See No. 58.

     63. Portrait of CAPT. JOHN BROWN, to which is attached a photographic facsimile of his prophetic last words.

     64. This is the photographic portrait mentioned in No. 58.

     65. This is the picture which has been designated as the JOHN BROWN "Apotheosis." Orville C. Brown, who presented the Historical Society with this copy, gives in substance the following account of the picture; Photo copy of the painting of heroic size, which I saw on exhibition in Utica, N. Y., soon after John Brown's death. I give a key with the picture, as I understood from the explanation given me by the artist who produced the painting, and kindly made me the copy; (1) The central figure, JOHN BROWN. (2) Above him, the Virgina coat of arms. (3) In foreground, at the right, statute of liberty blindfolded. (4) At his left, two sympathizing friends. (5) At his right, two officials with imbecile expression of disgust of the prisoners noticing the colored woman and child. (6) The sheriff, with angry look at the woman, whose child's face seems but the reflection of his own.

     66. THADDEUS HYATT, of New York, was, in 1856, chairman and largely the business manager of the national Kansas Committee, which, in 1856 and 1857, promoted emigration to Kansas, raising large sums of money through voluntary contributions, and expending the same in arming, outfitting and forwarding emigrant companies overland through Iowa and Nebraska to Kansas. In 1860, he was brought to Washington as a witness before Senator Mason's committee for the investigation of John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid. Refusing to testify, Mr. Hyatt was placed in jail at Washington, and there confined 13 weeks. He there gave strict attention to his New York business interests, which were extensive, and freely gave his portrait to those who sought it, with his autograph and the place, Washington jail, boldly inscribed. This portrait (No. 66) was presented to Dr. Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, April 21, 1850. The portrait, No. 69, was contributed by Mr. Hyatt to the collections of the Kansas State Historical Society in 1892. He has made large contributions to the manuscript collections of the library of the Society.

     67. OWEN BROWN, son of Capt. John Brown, of Osawatomie, was born in Ohio, in 1824. He came to Kansas in the spring of 1855, and settled near Osawatomie. He was an active member of the companies of his father and brother, Capt. John Brown, jr., on the free-state side in Kansas in 1855 and 1856. He was with his father in the Harper's Ferry raid, 1859, but escaped the fate of most of the other members of the expedition. He


light yellow divider
Page (18)


continued to reside in Ohio, and afterwards in California, until his death, near Pasadena, in 1889.

     68. JAMES MONTGOMERY was born in Ohio, in 1814. He afterwards lived in Kentucky. He settled in Linn county, Kansas, in 1854. He was a farmer, and a preacher in the Campbellite church. In 1857, he organized, in Linn county, the "The Slave Protective Company," and became an effective leader of the free-state men in southeast Kansas. He became colonel of the third Kansas infantry in 1861; was afterwards colonel of the second South Carolina colored regiment, and served with distinction through the war. He died December 6, 1871.

     69. THADDEUS HYATT. See No. 66.

     70. The group contains the photos of persons who were in some way associated with Capt. John Brown in Kansas. At the time of a reunion in the rooms of the Kansas State Historical Society, at Topeka, this picture was taken. The names are as follows: Jacob Willets, John Armstrong, Dan. H. Horne, August H. Barnard, John Richie, Charles W. Moffett, Edward Bodwell, and F. G. Adams.

     71. COL. DANIEL H. HORNE was born in New Hampshire, in 1828, coming to Kansas in 1854. He was one of the company which founded Topeka, in December of that year, and was for many years one of its most useful citizens. He was captain of a free-state company in the Wakarusa war. He served in the eleventh Kansas regiment in 1862, and was captain in the second regiment, Kansas militia, in the Price raid, in 1864. He was a member of the Kansas state senate, 1865-'66. He now resides in California,

     72. COL. SAMUEL N. WOOD was born in Ohio, in 1825, and came to Kansas in the early summer of 1854, settling near Lawrence. He was a prominent actor in the Branson rescue, in November, 1855. He was a member of the house of representatives in 1860, and was state senator in 1861; was a lieutenant colonel of a Missouri regiment during the war, and repeatedly served as a member of the legislature subsequent to the war. He always occupied a prominent position in Kansas affairs, until his cowardly assassination, June 3, 1891. He was always a prominent member of the State Historical Society, and was vice president at the time of his death.

     73. ENOCH CHASE was born in Massachusetts, in 1824. He was one of the original founders of Topeka, Kas., in December, 1854, and was always a prominent citizen of the town until his death, April 24, 1888.

     74. FLOYD P. BAKER was born in the State of New York, in 1820. Before coming to Kansas, he resided in Michigan, Wisconsin, and in the Sandwich Islands. While a resident of Hawaii, from 1853 to 1855, he held, for a year and a half, the position of crown attorney and clerk of the district court. He settled in Nemaha county, Kas., in 1860. In 1862, he was a member of the Kansas house of representatives. He has been a prominent editor and publisher in Kansas for 30 years, chiefly as editor of the Commonwealth, at Topeka. He was United States commissioner to the international exposition, at Paris, in 1878. He was one of the founders of the Kansas State Historical Society; has always been a member of its board of directors, and of its executive committee, and has been president of the Society. He has held many other prominent positions.

     75. PROF. B. F. MUDGE was born in Maine, in 1817. He resided for many years in Massachusetts; came to Kansas in 1861; was appointed state geologist in 1863; and prepared a report on Kansas geology in 1864, which was published in 1866. He was for many years professor of geology and associated sciences in the State Agricultural College. He made extensive collections in Kansas and Colorado for the Yale College


light yellow divider
Page (19)


museum. He contributed numerous articles on the geology of Kansas for the reports of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, and to Professor Hayden's report on the geology of the West. He died in Manhattan, where he had long resided, in 1879.

     76. FRANKLIN G. ADAMS was born in the State of New York, in 1824. He came to Kansas in 1855; has been a lawyer and an editor; and has occupied various public positions. He has been secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society since the beginning of its work, in 1876.

     77. HON. PERCIVAL G. LOWE was born in New Hampshire, in 1828. He came to Kansas in 1849, and was for many years connected with the United States army in various positions. He has been a prominent citizen of Leavenworth county, since its settlement in 1854; has been sheriff of the county; and represented the county in the state senate from 1885 to 1889. He has long been a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society; is now president of the society, having been elected in January, 1893.

     78. COL. SAMUEL WALKER was born in Ohio, in 1822; settled in Kansas in 1854, near Lawrence; was prominent on the free-state side during the territorial struggle, and was colonel of the fourth cavalary at the Wakarusa war; was a member of the Topeka legislature in 1856; and was major of the fifth Kansas regiment, and lieutenant colonel of the sixteenth cavalry regiment, and was promoted to brevet brigadier general in 1865. He died in 1893.

     79. WIRT W. WALTON was born in Ohio, in 1852. He came to Kansas in 1870, first residing in Labette county, and afterwards in Cowley county. He was journal clerk of the Kansas house of representatives in 1873, and chief clerk in 1877, 1879, and 1881, and was assistant superintendent of public instruction in 1877-'80. He represented Clay county in the house of representatives in 1882. He was a journalist, and was editor of the Clay Centre Dispatch at the time of his death, in 1886.

     80. THOMAS BROWER PEACOCK was born in Ohio, in 1852; settled in Independence, Kas., in 1872; is a printer, editor, and author. His published volumes are: "Poems," 1872; "The Vendetta," and other poems, 1876; "The Rhyme of the Border War," 1880' "Poems of the Plains and Songs of the Solitudes," 1887. He resides at Topeka.

     81. The picture represents a scene in the battle of Hickory Point; an engagement between free-state and pro-slavery forces, September 13, 1856, in Jefferson county, Kansas. The pro-slavery men were intrenched in a blacksmith shop. The free-state men, with cannon, undertook to dislodge them. The engagement continued from the middle of the day until nightfall. One person was killed on the pro-slavery side; others were wounded, on both sides. In the evening the free-state men withdrew to Oskaloosa, five miles distant, where, as they were about to encamp for the night, they were arrested, 101 in number, by a force of United States troops, for the violation of the terms of a proclamation which had been issued by Governor Geary. Under this charge they were confined in a temporary prison at Lecompton. By the March follow- ing all had escaped but 13. These were then unconditionally pardoned by Governor Geary. No. 82 presents an inside view of the Lecompton prison, with the Hickory Point prisoners. Both the pictures were drawn by Henry Breyman, one of the prisoners, who was a settler in Douglas county.

     82. LECOMPTON PRISON. See No. 81.

     83. The picture shows the log house built by William H. R. Lykins, in the fall of 1854, as his pre-emption cabin, on ground which became a part of the city of Lawrence. The house was used as the first post


light yellow divider
Page (20)


office in Lawrence. It was the voting place for Lawrence precinct in the territorial election of March 30, 1855. Geo. H. Crocker became the occupant of the house in 1856, and the figures in the foreground in the picture represent the members of his family at that time. Mr. Lykins died at Kansas City, Mo., in June, 1893.

     84. This house was built by Clark Stearns, who made his settlement May 26, 1854. Charles H. Branscombe, as agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, in July, 1854, selected the land for the town of Lawrence, and made an agreement with Mr. Stearns for the purchase of his right for $500. The amount was paid in gold on the 29th of September, by Gen. S. C. Pomeroy, as agent for the company.

     85. The picture is an interior view of the Kansas and Colorado exhibit at the cotton centennial exposition at New Orleans, in 1884 and 1885.

     86. The picture is a view of Lawrence from Mount Oread, upon the summit of which are now the Kansas University buildings. The view was taken about the year 1859, and, among other things, shows some of the materials which had then been brought on the ground for the construction of the first university building.

     87. The picture shows the structures erected for dwellings and other uses by the first New England settlers at Lawrence in the early autumn of 1854. The picture is photographed from a pen drawing made for Mr. J. G. Sands. Among the houses is the residence and business house of Mr. Sands, the buillding which was used for the first church in Lawrence, and also the first hotel building.

     88. KANSAS CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE OF 1856. The picture shows portraits of the members of the committee: William A. Howard, of Michigan; John Sherman, of Ohio; and Mordecai Oliver, of Missouri; together with their secretary, William Blair Lord, and their sergeant-at- arms, John Upton. The committee was appointed by Nathaniel P. Banks, speaker of the United States house of representatives, in May, 1856. Under a resolution of the house, the committee immediately visited Kansas to investigate the troubles growing out of election frauds and other unlawful acts which had occurred in the administration of the affairs of Kansas Territory. Their report, of which 20,000 copies were printed, is a book of 1,346 pages. The book contains a remarkably full collection of political facts in the early history of Kansas Territory; has the name of nearly every voter in the territory, and the affidavits of many prominent men of both political parties in regard to leading events. The picture was given to the State Historical Society by Mr. Lord, the secretary.

     89. BRINTON WEBB WOODWARD was born in Pennsylvania, in 1834; settled in Lawrence, Kas., May 20, 1855. He has been a regent of the Kansas University, president of the Kansas Academy of Language and Literature, and is now president of the University Extension Association, of Lawrence. He is author of a volume entitled "Old Wine in New Bottles," published in Lawrence in 1890.

     90. JOHN T. JONES (Ottawa Jones) was born in Canada, in June, 1808. His father was an Englishman; his mother an Indian woman of the Chippewa nation. While yet a little boy he became attached to the family of a captain of a vessel of the lakes. He afterwards was taken into the mission school of Rev. Isaac McCoy, at Carey, Mich., near where the city of Niles now is; afterwards he was four years at Hamilton College, New York. He then taught for one year at Choctaw Academy, Kentucky. He became inter- preter at Sault Ste. Marie for various tribes. He came to Kansas with the Pottawatomies about the year 1837. About the year 1847, he became a member of the Ottawa tribe. He built a dwelling and a store. His home, near the present town of Ottawa, Kas., became a noted place in early


light yellow divider
Page (21)


history by reason of the intelligent hospitality of the large-minded owner. In 1856, his property was destroyed by the pro-slavery men, but he restored his dwelling, and lived many years to witness and aid in the prosperity of Kansas. He was one of the founders of the Ottawa University. He died in 1873.

     91. The picture represents a camp scene at Stevenson, Ala., September 19, 1863, in which COL. JOHN A. MARTIN, of the eighth Kansas regiment, volunteers, is the central figure in the group. He is surrounded by officers of his regiment, namely; (1) Maj. Edw. F. Schneider; (2) Capt. Edgar P. Trego, of Co. H.; [(3) Col. John A. Martin]; (4) Capt. James M. Graham; (5) Capt. John Conover. This picture is copied from a tintype. It was placed in the collections of the Kansas State Historical Society by Governor Martin.

     92. EDGAR WATSON HOWE was born in Indiana, in 1854. He has lived in Kansas almost from boyhood. He established the Atchison Globe, a daily newspaper, at Atchison, in 1877, and continues to be its editor and publisher. He is the author of the following volumes: "The Story of a Country Town," Boston, 1884; "The Mystery of the Locks," 1885; "The Moonlight Boy," 1886; A Man Story," 1888; "An Ante-Mortem Statment," 1891. These have been widely read, the first in the list having gone through more than 20 editions.

     93. HON. EUGENE F. WARE is a native of Connecticut. He was a union soldier in an Iowa regiment in the war of the rebellion, and later became a member of the staff of Gen. Robert B. Mitchell, of Kansas. Soon after the war he became a resident of Bourbon county, and has for many years resided at Fort Scott. He is a lawyer. He was state senator from 1881 to 1885. He is the author of poems, most of which were originally published in the Fort Scott Monitor, over the signature "Ironquill." His poems have been universally read and admired. In 1885, they were compiled and published in a volume entitled "The Rhymes of Ironquill," and in 1889 a second edition of the same was published. He is a member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society.

     94. JOHN PRESTON CAMPBELL was born in Boston, in 1849. He resides at Abilene, Kas.; is a lawyer. He is the author of the following books, "The Land of Sun and Song," 1888; "Merl of Medevon, and other Prose Writings," 1888; "My Mate Immortal," 1890; "Poetical Works," 1885; Queen Sylvia," and other poems, 1886; "The Summerless Sea," and other poems, 1888.

     95. GOV. ANDREW H. REEDER, after his term of service as the first governor of Kansas Territory, became a leader of the free-state movement in the territory. His life became in danger. He was placed by his friends in concealment at Kansas City, for two weeks. He then escaped, in disguise, on board a steamboat, reached Alton, Ill., thence Chicago, where, in his disguise, he was photographed in the presence of Doctor Ray, of the Chicago Tribune, and Hon. Edward L. Pierce, of Massachusetts. The latter presented the picture to the Kansas State Historical Society.

     96. DAVID R. ATCHISON was born in Kentucky, in 1807. He early became a resident of western Missouri, as a lawyer; was a member of the state legislature, judge of the circuit court, and, in 1843, was elected United States senator, a place which he held until 1855, the last years of the term of service being president of the senate, and acting vice president of the United States. He took a zealous part in protecting the interests of the institution of slavery, and, on the opening of Kansas to settlement, was a leader in the effort to make Kansas a slave state. His name is


light yellow divider
Page (21)


perpetuated in the names of a county and city in Kansas, and in that of a great railroad system.

     97. GOV. JAMES W. DENVER, was born in Virginia, in 1818. He removed to Missouri in 1841, and became a lawyer. He was a captain in the Mexican war, and at the close of the war removed to California; was a state senator in 1852, and a member of Congress from California in 1855-'57. He was appointed commissioner of Inidan affairs by President Buchanan, and acted as governor of Kansas Territory from December, 1858, until March, 1859, when he resigned, to again become commissioner of Indian affairs. He was a brigadier general in the union army, from 1861 to 1863. He died in Washington, in 1892.

     98. HON. ELI THAYER was born in Massachusetts, in 1819. He was for many years prominent as an educator at Worcestor, and was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature at the time of the opening of Kansas to settlement. He procured a charter for the New England Emigrant Aid Company, an organization which, through the zeal and engery of Mr. Thayer, greatly promoted emigration to Kansas from the northern states, thus contributing very largely to the movements which resulted in making Kansas a free state. Mr. Thayer was a member of Congress from Massachusetts for two terms, 1857-'61. He has published a volume of congressional speeches, 1860, and a volume entitled "A History of the Kansas Crusade, its Friends and its Foes," with an introduction by Rev. Edward Everett Hale, 1889. He still resides at Worcester, Mass.

     99. FREDERICK PERRY STANTON was born in Alexandria, Va., in 1814, and was educated as a lawyer. In 1834, he became a resident of Tennessee, which state he represented in Congress for 10 years, 1845-'55. In 1857, he became secretary of Kansas Territory by appointment of President Buchanan, and served until January, 1858, a part of the period as acting governor, rendering very important services to the people of the territory. He has for many years resided at Farmwell, Va.

     100. JOHN BROWN was born in Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800, and died at Charlestown, Va., December 2, 1859. He gave his life for the freedom of the slave. He came to Kansas in the fall of 1855, and spent much of his time in the territory for more than three years, supporting the free- state cause and befriending fugitive slaves from Missouri. He was at Lawrence in the Wakarusa war, December, 1855; at the sacking of Lawrence, May 21, 1856; at the battle of Osawatomie, August 30, 1856; at the defense of Lawrence, September 14, 1856; and escorted 11 fugitive slaves through Kansas in December, 1858, and January, 1859, the last time he was in Kansas. The bust is a plaster cast from a marble bust owned by Mrs. Mary E. Stearns, of Medford, Mass., which was made by her order by Brackett, from measurements taken by him at Charlestown, Va., where Captain Brown was awaiting his execution, after condemnation for his leadership of the Harper's Ferry invasion.

     101. MRS. L. A. B. STEELE was born in Marietta, Ohio, October 7, 1833. She is a daughter of the late Rev. A. Blukely, and the wife of Judge L. S. Steele. She has for many years resided at Lawrence, Kas. She has written numerous serials and essays for magazines and newspapers, and is the author of a volume entitled, "Rev. Adonijah and his Wife's Relations," published in New York, in 1879.

     102. MRS. MARIA ELIZABETH DE GEER was born in Ireland, November 11, 1835, and early removed to Canada with her parents. She settled in Scott county, Kansas, in 1879, and was one of the founders of the towns of Scott City and Sharon Springs, in that county. She afterwards resided in Topeka, but is now again a resident of Canada. She has been a writer and lecturer on temperance, prison reform, and other subjects. She studied


light yellow divider
Page (23)


for the legal profession, and practiced law for a number of years while residing in Kansas, and in 1883 was admitted to practice in the supreme court of Kansas, being the second woman to be honored with that privilege.

     103. COL. ALEXANDER S. JOHNSON was born at the Shawnee Mission labor school, in Kansas, in 1832; his father, Rev. Thomas Johnson, being at that time superintendent of the mission. Colonel Johnson has always resided in Kansas. His home has been for many years at Topeka. He is the oldest resident of Kansas born in the limits of the state. He has been a prominent citizen since the beginning of the settlement of Kansas Territory. He was a member of the first territorial legislature, 1855. He was lieutenant colonel of the thirteenth regiment Kansas militia in the defense of the border from the Price raid invasion in 1864. He was for many years land commissioner of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company, and has held many other responsible positions.


pale blue divider

Go to previoius section  Go to next section  Return to 'Contents'