KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


REPUBLIC COUNTY, Part 9

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WHITE ROCK.

White Rock is a small village ten miles northwest of Scandia, and six miles from the mouth of the stream of the same name a tributary of the Republican rising in Smith County, and running due east across Jewell into Republic County. It is near the western boundary, and was one of the most prosperous and flourishing towns in the county until the Central Branch Railroad was completed up the east side of the Republican. Even that misfortune did not destroy the town altogether. It is still a business point, although it has not grown since. It was then the depot of trade for a broad district, embracing the famous valley of White Rock and the adjacent portion of the Republican. The valley of the White Rock is the finest portion of Jewell or Republic counties, and during the frontier days more Indian outrages occurred within its borders than along any other stream in these counties. These outrages occurred year after year until 1870 when a permanent peace succeeded throughout the homestead region. Emigrants, as now they wend their way up the peaceful valley of this beautiful stream, seeking homesteads on the adjacent land; or in the counties farther to the west, can hardly realize the change in circumstances. Now substantial and beautiful homes are found at intervals along the valley. The Burlington & Missouri River Railroad has surveyed a line to this place and should the county construct the line the town will resume its past prosperity. The stream furnishes water-power a greater part of the year for a substantial grist-mill, which is furnished with steam power for steady work. The schools are in good condition. The population, of about 200, take great interest in all that pertains to the weal of their place, and the school being the most important, has careful attention. The Baptists here have a church edifice and their denomination flourishes both here and in the adjacent country. Other denominations worship in their church.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - WHITE ROCK TOWNSHIP.

I. N. CRISPIN, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Clark County, Ohio, in 1830, had remained there until twenty years old; thence to Henry County, Iowa, remaining there until the fall of 1870, when he again started West, locating in Nebraska; where he resided only six months, and came to Kansas in the spring of 1871, and located in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 6, Township 2, Range 5. The place is watered by a branch of White Rock Creek, which runs through one corner of the place, with some timber along its banks--from fifteen to twenty acres--furnishing all the timber necessary for the farm; besides this he has planted a fine grove of forest trees, a good orchard, and a variety of small fruits. He has 125 acres under the plow, a frame house 16x20 feet, and 14x18 feet, good stable, granary, and corn-crib, and has one of the choicest farms in the county for its size, but a short distance from the village of White Rock, and handy to market. He is engaged in stock-raising to some extent--has sixty head of cattle, forty head of hogs, and eighteen head of horses; and is one of the many who came to the State with but little to do with, and has been successful. Mr. Crispin has lately enclosed his farm with a wire fence, and added to it one of Holiday's Standard windmills, which pumps water for his stock, grinds feed, and runs a corn-sheller, churn and grindstone. Mr. Crispin was married in 1851, in Henry County, Iowa, to Miss Brewington, of that place. They have four children--Owen, W. H., Annie and Ada. Mr. Crispin is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE W. FERGASON, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1850. In 1857 emigrated to Stephenson, Ill., remaining until 1870; thence to Republic County, Kan., and took a homestead on Section 19, Township 2, Range 5 and was among the first settlers in this part of the township. He was seventy-five miles from market, and no buildings in sight anywhere. He has 110 acres under the plow, forty acres of pasture, two acres of forest trees, a good peach orchard, good frame house, granary and stables, and is working into stock-raising--has twelve head of cattle and forty head of hogs. He was married in 1872 to Miss Mary J. Osborne, of Jewell County, Kan. They have six children--Sadie A., Luella, Estella, William H., Charles F. and Freddie.

E. S. McKAY, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Essex County, Canada, in 1843. He emigrated to Michigan in 1863 and engaged in lumbering on Lake Superior. In 1871 he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and homesteaded the northeast quarter of Section 32, Township 2, Range 5. He has 145 acres under the plow, and the finest grove of forest trees, consisting of six acres, mostly in maple, in this part of the county; and has two acres of fine orchard, consisting of apple, peach, cherry, plum and apricot trees; a fine lot of grapes, and small fruits of all kinds; a good house, 14x30 feet; a good barn, 14x28 feet; and a granary, 14 x 17 feet. He is extensively engaged in raising swine, turning off from fifty to 100 head annually. He was married in 1875 to miss Martha E. Forest, of Des Moines, Iowa. They have three children-- Curtice, Anna and Earnest. He is a member of White Rock Lodge, No. 126, I. O. O. F.

P. McHUTCHON, attorney, was born in Scotland, in 1833, and was brought up in the mercantile business. In 1863 he emigrated to America, locating in New York City, and was employed in A. T. Stewart's store, remaining there a little over one year, and then went to Detroit, Mich, remaining there two years, and was engaged in the mercantile business. In 1866 he located in Cincinnati, and was engaged in handling butter and the exchange business. After remaining here about two years he closed out his business, and went to Indianapolis and engaged in the dry goods trade, remaining there until 1869, emigrating from there to Kansas, locating in Republic County. In the spring of 1871 he took a homestead on Section 19, Township 1, Range 5, and afterward pre-empted 160 acres on the same section. He improved this place, and remained there until 1879, then located in Jewell County, and bought a farm on Section 13, Township 2, Range 6. There is a fine stone quarry on the place, from which he is taking from 250 to 300 cords annually, and is farming some. In 1849 he commenced reading law, and devoted a part of this time to the study until 1874, when he was admitted to practice in the higher courts, and has been engaged in practice the most of the time since at White Rock, and is the only attorney in the place. He is a member of the Masonic order.

S. E. MORLAN, capitalist, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1821. From the age of two years until 1855 was in Beaver County, Pa. He went from there to California, and located near Placerville, where he engaged in mining, remaining there until 1869. He then returned East, and in 1870 came to Kansas and located in White Rock, and pre-empted 160 acres of land on Sections 31 and 32, remaining on the place a few months, and then in company with his brother engaged in the mercantile business in White Rock, running one of the first stores in the place; they also had the post-office for a number of years, and continued in business seven years. They do a large business, and have been engaged in loaning money all the time they have been in Kansas. Since 1879 they have been engaged in real estate, buying and selling farms, and owning several farms at the present time. They are among the wealthiest men in the county, also own a part of the town site. He was married in 1874 to Miss Anna Bryes, of White Rock. They have three children--Clara, Fred and Samuel E.

A. B. OGLE, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1847. While quite young his parents emigrated to Andrew County, Mo. In 1864 he enlisted in the Forty-third Missouri Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. After coming out of the army he remained in Missouri until 1870, when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and took a homestead on Sections 7 and 8, Township 2, Range 5. He has since bought 160 acres adjoining, making a farm of 320 acres in one body. He has 200 acres under the plow, sixty-five acres of pasture, three and one half miles of hedge, two acres of forest trees, good wells with wind-mill for pumping; barn, 14x28 feet, house and other improvements. The place is all fenced. Mr. Ogle is engaged in raising stock, and has forty head mostly graded. He has some fine blooded stock--has one two-year old that weighs 1,500 pounds--has forty head of hogs, and has been very successful since he came here. He is one of the leading men in the township, and a pleasant gentleman. He is Township Trustee and Assessor, also takes an active interest in school matters. He was married in 1871 in Marysville, Mo., to Miss C. Pool, of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Ogle are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

CHARLES PAIRAN, dealer in general merchandise, White Rock, was born in Wolfsanger, near Hesse Cassel, Germany, in 183l, and was raised there until 1846, when he went to Egeln, in Prussia, where he was employed in a dry goods house until 1852, when he emigrated to America, locating at Lockville, Fairfield County, Ohio, trying his hand at farming until the fall of the same year, when he went to clerking for Ernst Becker, at Lancaster, Ohio. In 1854 he became a partner in the general merchandise store of Mithoff Brothers at Lockville, Ohio. In 1856 commenced business on his own account at Lancaster, Ohio, where he remained until 1869. He then emigrated to Kansas, locating in Washington County, where he took a homestead, remaining on his place five years; coming from there to White Rock, Republic County, and bought out W. H. Collin's mercantile business, and has continued in that trade there since. His store is 20x70 feet, filled with all kinds of merchandise, and he has built up a good trade, his sales averaging $22,000 per annum. Although the railroad has built up opposition towns Mr. Pairan still holds his trade, and is considered by all who know him as the model merchant of Republic County. He still retains the homestead in Washington County. He was married in 1855 to Miss M. L. Mayer. They have four children--W. C., Clarence H., Francis L. and Victor A. Mr. Pairan is a member of the Lutheran Church.

JOHN PERSINGER, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Butler County, Va., in 1835. When fifteen years of age he settled in Tennessee, where he engaged in farming. In 1863 he enlisted in the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry, serving three years, the most of the time serving as a pilot conducting Union men from the South to volunteer in the Union Army; he was taken prisoner during one of these trips but succeeded in making his escape at the end of forty-nine days. After coming out of the army remained in Tennessee until 1870, then emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County, and secured a homestead on Section 20, Township 2, Range 5. For the first two or three years he had to go eighty miles after his provisions, while now he is but ten miles from market. He has 100 acres under the plow, five acres of forest trees, a peach orchard of 300 trees, 480 rods of hedge, and is engaged in raising hogs and horses. He was married in 1867 to Miss Elizabeth Roller. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

H. K. PECKHAM, postmaster, was born in Utica, N. Y., in 1849, In 1860 he located in Chenango County, remaining there until 1871; emigrating from there to Kansas he located in Republic County, and took a homestead on Section 30, Township 2, Range 5. He improved his place, and remained there five years; he then located at White Rock, and opened a drug store, the first exclusive drug stock in the place; has continued in the business, and has built up a large trade. He is a thorough business man, and one of the most enterprising merchants in the county; he is very popular, and his many friends are anxious to have him represent them in the State Legislature; he is well qualified to fill the position, and would be sure to give satisfaction to his constituents. He is farming some in connection with his other business. He was united in marriage with Miss Bobcock, of Battle Creek, Mich., in 1870. They have six children--Ada, Estella, Edith, John, Ray and Bert. He is a member of White Rock Lodge No. 126, I. O. O. F. He was appointed postmaster in 1881; which office he still holds.

T. POMEROY, merchant and farmer, White Rock, was born in Ireland, in 1841. He emigrated to America in 1848 locating in Chicago, and remaining there until 1865, and was with his father in the boot and shoe trade. Going from Chicago to Lyon County, Iowa he engaged in farming. In 1871 he settled in Republic County, Kan., and took a homestead on Section 21, Township 2, Range 5. He has lived in the place continually since and has it under good cultivation; seventy-five acres under the plow; thirty-five acres fenced; has planted 7,000 forest trees, four acres of orchard, and has a good frame house, 16x24 feet; barn, 18x20 feet; and is raising some stock--has five head of horses, thirteen head of cattle, forty head of hogs. In January, 1881, he opened a store at White Rock village with a full line of general merchandise, and has been doing a good business. He served in the army in the Twenty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry from 1861 to 1865; and was wounded and captured during the time. He was married in 1870 to Miss Mary Stark, of Lyon County, Iowa. They have six children--Charley, Margarette, Alice, Henry, Mary and Emma.

J. Z. SCOTT, M. D., P. O. White Rock, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1828, remaining there (with the exception of two years, during which he was in the Mexican war) until twenty-one years of age, when he removed to Indiana, remaining there five years; going from there to Linn County, Iowa and took up the study of medicine. In 1868 he took a course of lectures at the Rush Medical College in Chicago, and then commenced the practice of medicine. In 1871 he came to Kansas, and located in White Rock Township. He was the first regular physician in this part of the country; and pre-empted 160 acres in Section 23, and began to improve the place the following year. In 1874 he returned to Iowa, took a course of lectures in the Iowa University, and a third course of lectures in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of Keokuk, Iowa, where he graduated in 1878. He then returned to his farm in Kansas, and soon built up a large practice; also improved his farm by breaking 120 acres, and planting three acres of forest and orchard trees. He built two good houses, one 16 1/2x26 1/2 feet; and one 22x22 feet; and remained there until 1880; when he sold out, and went to southwest Missouri, and engaged in the hardware business with his sons; and at that place built up a large practice of medicine; but his health failing he returned to Kansas in the fall of 1882, and purchased a farm in the same township he first located in, and but one-half mile from his old place, and resumed his practice. He has a good farm, with thirty-five acres in cultivation, and has in preparation a good residence, and will make this his future home, being satisfied that Kansas is the place to live in if one wants to make money and have good health. He was married in 1851 in Marion County, Ind., to Miss Sarah F. Arnett, of that county. They have five children--Charles S., Frank M., George M., Lida E. and Minnie May. Mr. Scott is a member of the Masonic order.

CHARLES STEWART, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Stephenson County, Ill., in 1845 remaining there until 1871; when he emigrated to Kansas, locating in Republic County. He was among the early settlers in this part of the county; it, at that time, being devoid of improvements. He took a homestead on Section 30, Township 2, Range 5. There were plenty of buffalo on the prairie, and it was seventy-five miles to a railroad. He has a fine place, with 132 acres under the plow, twenty-eight acres of pasture, has planted six acres of forest trees, and has a good orchard of apple and peach trees, two miles of hedge; and a fine house 14x18 feet, with wing 12x24 feet. He is raising stock, and has about twenty-five head of cattle, and fifty head of hogs; and has made money ever since his settlement, his capital being one mule and $1 in money when he came. He was married July 2, 1875, to Miss Julia Sullivan, of White Rock. They have one son--Charles H.

JAMES. STEWART, farmer, P. O. White Rock, was born in Stephenson County, Ill., in 1843. August 12, 1862, he enlisted in the Ninety-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving until July 5, 1865. He was wounded in the siege of Vicksburg, receiving a gun-shot wound. After coming out of the army he remained one year in Illinois, then took a trip to Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, finally locating in Dubuque; and remained there about eighteen months engaged in boiler making. In the spring of 1871 he came to Kansas, locating in Republic County; and took a homestead on Section 31, Township 2, Range 5. He was one of the first homesteaders on the prairie in this township; and was eighty miles from railroads, and buffalo and antelope were roaming over this part of the township. He has 110 acres under the plow, eleven acres of pasture, two acres of timber, 160 rods of hedge, fifty apple and fifty peach trees, and small fruits of all kinds. He is engaged in stock raising quite extensively, and has twenty-five head of cattle, and forty-five head of hogs, and also raises some horses. He was married in 1873 to Miss A. J. Silvis, of Jewell County, Kan. They have two children - William C. and Olive A.

JAKE S. TIPPERY, hardware, P. O. White Rock, was born in Stephenson County, Ill., in 1850, and was raised at Freeport, where he learned the tinners' trade. In the fall of 1875 he came to Kansas, locating in White Rock, and put in a stock of hardware, this being the first stock of the kind in the place, and succeeded in working up an extensive trade; he is a thorough business man, and a general favorite, and although the railroad has run within eight miles of White Rock he has held his share at the trade. He has been offered inducements by private parties of Hardy, Neb., to locate there, and by so doing would hold the most of his old customers besides gaining a large trade from other territory, and if he goes there he will be sure to work up a large trade. Jake has been a leading Republican in his county, and is respected by all. He was married in 1870 to Miss N. L. Martin of Illinois. They have one son - J. W.

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