KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


CHEROKEE COUNTY, Part 15

[TOC] [part 14] [Cutler's History]

LYON TOWNSHIP.

JESSE T. AMOS, farmer and stock-raiser and dealer, Section 10, P. O. Keelville, was born in Clinton County, Ind., in 1843 and was connected with farming there till 1869, when he located here in 1870, and has carried on his present industry since. He married, in Vernon County, Mo., in 1870, Miss Louisa E. Ward, of his native county. They have a family of three sons -- Mason, Herman and Jesse H. Mr. Amos did active service in Company F, Thirtieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the late civil war. He has been an active worker in the industrial life of his locality since coming here.

SQUIRE F. M. B. AMOS, farmer and stock-raiser, Sections 23 and 27, P. O. Keelville, was born in Clinton County, Ind., in 1840, and received his literary education in the public schools of his native county. At the age of seventeen, he engaged at the profession of teaching, with which he was reputably connected for eleven years, after which he located here and engaged at farming and stock-raising, which industry he has been very successfully identified with since. In 1862, he married, in Clinton County, Ind., Miss Mollie C. Thomas, who was born and reared in Chillicothe, Ohio. They have a family of four sons and five daughters -- Eva M., Stanley H., Monterey M., Justin B., Ellston, Helen, Fred L., F. M. B. and Ruby P. Squire Amos has worked actively toward the development of the social and industrial life of this locality since coming here. He has been active,, officially, as Township Trustee and Justice of the Peace almost continuously since locating here. Has been an active member of the A. F. & A. M. society since 1861, and of the I. O. O. F. society for the last eighteen years. His farm consists of 400 acres of improved land well stocked and fenced and watered,, and has an orchard of about 1,000 fruit trees, all bearing. Squire Amos did active service in Company C, Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the late civil war.

HERBERT COOL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 2, P. O. Keelville, was born in Hampshire County, W. Va., in 1826, and was reared to the farming industry. In 1855, he settled in McLean County, Ill., and carried on his industry there until 1870, when he came here, and has been very successfully identified with farming and stock-raising since. In 1857, he married Miss Esther J. Haner, a native of McLean County, Ill., who departed this life August 18, 1881, and is buried in the Songer Cemetery, Neosho Township, aged forty-two years, leaving a family of four sons and two daughters -- John W., Commodore F., Effie M., James E., Nellie C. and Clarence L. Mr. Cool has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over thirty years. His farm contains 200 acres of improved land, well stocked, fenced and watered, and has a nice orchard of 150 fruit trees of various kinds.

JOHN BOWEN DAVIS, farmer and stock-raiser, Sections 9 and 16, P. O. Keelville, was born in Llangadock, Carmarthenshire, South Wales, in 1832, and was educated to the carpenter's trade, which he followed in his native country until 1867, when he came to America and settled here the same year, and carried on his trade in Baxter Springs for a few years, when he engaged at his present industry, which he has very successful carried on since. He married Mrs. Mary Gray (nee Price) in his native country. They have a family of four sons and three daughters -- John W. Gray, Mary A., Margretta, Jenett, Bowen, William and George. Mr. Davis has worked actively in the development of the social and industrial life of his locality since coming here. His farm contains 160 acres of improved land, well fenced and watered and stocked, with a handsome dwelling, barns and stables, and a nice orchard of 200 trees of different varieties of fruits, and 500 grape vines of well assorted varieties.

JOHN S. DILL, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 8, P. O. Keelville, was born in Fountain County, Ind., in 1830, and settled in Iowa in 1850, and carried on farming there till 1875, when he located here, and has been successfully connected with that industry here since. In 1855, he married Miss Merribee J. Bowen, who was born in Missouri and reared in Iowa. They have four sons -- George W., Joseph, John F. and Grant. Mr. Dill did active service during the last three years of the late civil war, from which he was honorably discharged. His farm contains 200 acres of improved land, well fenced, watered and stocked, with a nice orchard of over 250 fruit trees and good dwellings and barns and stables.

CAPT. HUGH ERWIN, Postmaster and general merchandise, Keelville, was born in Lawrence County, Ind., February 18, 1836, and was reared a farmer and educated to the profession of law, in which he graduated from Asbury University, Ind., at the age of twenty-two. At the age of twenty-four, he was elected to represent his district in the Legislative Assembly of his native State, being the then youngest member of that body. Upon the breaking out of the war, he enlisted in defense of the Union in Company A, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and took command of his company as Captain, with which he was reputably connected until 1864, when he retired from the service, retaining his rank. He then entered public life again, and filled the Treasurer's chair of his native county for two terms, after which he was appointed to an active official position in the internal revenue department of the Third District of Indiana, and held the incumbency for seven years. He then came here, and has been actively connected with the mercantile business since. He was married, March 13, 1860, to Miss Susan E. Grayson, by whom he had one son. She died December 8, 1860. June 18, 1867, he married Miss Jane E. Williams, of Lawrence County, whose ancestors were among the most prominent of the pioneers of that locality. Mr. and Mrs. Erwin have two sons -- Frederick L. and William D. Capt. Erwin's ancestors were also among the most prominent pioneers of that locality. His grandfather, Judge William Erwin, was Territorial Magistrate under Harrison's administration, and afterward filled many public official positions of honor and trust. His father, William Erwin, although not active in public life, was among the leading men of his locality in developing the social and industrial life of it.

HON. J. S. GILLESPIE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 6, P. O. Kellville, was born in Yellow Springs, Blair County, Pen., in 1834, and was reared and educated in McLean County, Ill., where he was actively identified with the farming and stock-raising industry for many years. In the spring of 1876, he settled here, and has been successfully connected with his present industry since. He has a family of three sons and four daughters. He was married, in McLean County, Ill., in 1856, to Miss Esther B. Moses, of Bedford County, Penn., who departed this life in 1860, and is buried in the Lexington Cemetery, McLean County, Ill., leaving one daughter -- Emma Dorothea. His second marriage occurred in 1862 to Miss E. B. Thompson, of Muskingum County, Ohio, who departed this life in 1864, and is buried in the Lexington Cemetery, beside the first. In 1866, he married in Woodford County, Ill., Miss Julia A. Brown, who was born in Virginia and reared in McLean County, Ill. They have three sons and three daughters -- John C., William S., Richard A., Gracie M., Esther E. and Anna. Mr. Gillespie was an active man in the public life of McLean County, Ill., and held important official positions there for many years; since coming here, he has worked actively and devotedly for the advancement of the industries of this locality, and has served in the Legislative Assembly of the State and minor municipal positions. He is at present Justice of his locality.

JEROME B. GOODRICH, farmer and stock-raiser, Sections 29 to 34, Range 23, P. O. Keelville, was born in Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, in 1820, and was engaged in wagon and carriage manufacturing in that State until 1849. He then located in Bentonsport, Iowa, and carried on plow manufacturing for about thirteen years; then after spending about three years in farming in Clarke County, Mo., he located in Beardstown, Ill., and carried on the wagon and plow manufacture for several years, locating here in 1872, and has been actively engaged at his present industry since. In 1841, he married Miss Margaret J. Zinn, of Franklin County, Ohio. They have a family of four sons and four daughters living, and have buried two sons and two daughters. His farm contains 160 acres of improved land, well fenced and watered and stocked, with a first-class dwelling, barns and stables, and a nice orchard of about 1,500 trees of different varieties of fruits, has also five acres of blackberries, five acres of strawberries, four acres of raspberries, and a finely assorted number of grave vines, etc.

ANDREW JARRETT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 10, P. O. Baxter Springs, was born in Morgan County, Ind., in 1836. In 1858, he settled in Jackson County, Ill., and followed farming actively there till 1869, when he located here, and has successfully carried on his present industry since. In 1856, he married Miss Margaret Voyles, of Morgan County Ind. They have a family of six sons and six daughters. Mr. Jarrett has worked actively in the development of his industry since locating here. His farm contains 177 acres of improved land, well fenced, watered and stocked. It has a nice orchard of 200 trees of different kinds of fruit, good dwellings, stables, etc.

O. O. POTTER, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Columbus, was born in Illinois February 17, 1846. He received a business education, and began shoe and leather trade at the age of eighteen, in Illinois, and continued it three years. He started for California in March, 1867, by way of Omaha and Platte River, but on account of the Indian troubles, changed his course, coming back to Omaha, and then down the river to Kansas City, where he took the south trail by way of Fort Gibson. After reaching this section of the country, and seeing the favorable outlook, he decided to make it his home, and took a claim of 320 acres, which he improved and sold, and settled on his present farm in 1869, which he improved and is now running as a stock and grain farm, raising also a full line of all kind of fruit. Mr. Potter's farm is inclosed (sic)by hedge fence, and he has one of the finest residences in this section of the country. He was married to Miss Ethel M. Crandall, of Illinois, in 1866, who died, leaving five children -- Ralph H., Joseph O., Mary E., Robert R. and Ruby. He was married to Miss Bell Troyer, of Illinois, in 1882.

GAGE SLUSSER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 24, P. O. Columbus, was born in Lake County, Ill., in 1850. In 1869, he located here, and has been actively connected with his present industry since. In 1874, he married Miss Hattie E. Wetherly, a native of Lake County, Ill. They have one son and a daughter -- Dora J. and Archie. Mr. Slusser has worked actively in the development of the social and industrial life of his locality since coming here. His farm contains 160 acres of improved land, well fenced and stocked. He has a nice orchard of about 400 trees of different varieties of fruits, and has handsome dwelling, barns and stables.

GARDEN TOWNSHIP.

MICHAEL W. CARNEY, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 31, P. 0. Lowell, was born in Alleghany County, N. Y., in 1837. In 1857, he settled in Douglas County, Kan., where he carried on farming actively till after the war, when he located here, and has been successfully connected with his present industry since. In 1872, he married Miss Mary J. Spence, who was born in Jasper County, Mo,. in 1850. They have a family of three sons and one daughter-Arthur E., Carl C., Eugene L. and Mary J. Mr. Carney did active service in First Kansas Independent Battery, from its organization till its muster out; was honorably discharged as Second Lieutenant of the battery to which he was promoted, for meritorious conduct, from the ranks. He is an active member of the A. 0. U. W society. His farm contains 187 acres of improved land, well fenced and stocked, nice dwelling, barn and stables, and an orchard of 400 trees of a nicely assorted variety of fruits.

ENOCH CARTER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 13, P. 0. Quakervale, was born in Hendricks County, Ind., March 25, 1828, and was identified with farming successfully there until the spring of 1868, when he located here, and has been prominently identified with his present industry here since. In 1851, he married Miss Catherine Hodson, who was born in North Carolina, and reared in Hendricks County, Ind. They have a family of one son and a daughter living-Jane, now Mrs. Hon. C. W. Harvey and Chilon, farmer and stock-raiser, and have buried one daughter, Luella (Mrs. Richard Haworth), in the Quakervale Cemetery in January, 1882. Mr. Carter, during his residence here, was engaged for several years in the nursery business. His farm contains 160 acres of improved land, well fenced, watered and stocked. He has a handsome orchard of twenty acres of a nicely assorted variety of apple and pear trees, ten acres of assorted peach trees, and a full variety of small fruits, grapes, etc. He has worked actively in the development of the industrial life of his locality, and for many years was active as Land Agent of the K. C., Ft. S. & G. R. R.. He and his family are active members and supporters of the Church of Friends.

J. R. COMMONS, blacksmithing and farming, P. 0. Lowell, was born in Texas County, Mo., in 1844, and located here, with his people, in 1881, and was reared to the blacksmithing business by his father, who carried it on here for many years. In 1865, he married Miss Sarah Lee, who was born in Missouri and reared in Illinois. They have a family of two sons and one daughter-Maggie C., William H. and James D. Mr. Commons did active service in the militia of this State during the late civil war. His farm contains 115 acres of improved land, well fenced, watered and stocked, handsome dwelling, etc., and a nice orchard of 500 fruit trees of different varieties.

PETER COVERT, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 30, P. 0. Lowell, was born in Clark County, Ind., in 1838, and was reared in Atchison County, Mo. In 1858, he located in Pawnee County, Neb., and carried on farming actively for several years. In 1866, he located here, and has been active in his present industry since. In 1870, he married Miss Mahala Shepherd, who was born in Atchison County, Mo., in 1853. They have a family of one son and three daughters-Flora, Anna, Joseph A. and Ida May. Mr. Covert did active service in Company C, Second Nebraska Cavalry, from its organization until its muster out, and was honorably discharged. His farm contains eighty acres of improved land, well fenced and stocked, and having nice dwelling, stables, and an orchard of' thirty fruit trees of different kinds.

A. H. DOWELL, proprietor and owner of "Lowell Pottery Works," was born in Fairport, Muscatine County, Iowa, in 1847, and was reared to his present industry there. He located in Iola, Kan., in 1868; after following railroading for a few years, he located at Columbus, and established the pottery business, which, after a few years, he located here, and has very successfully carried it on since. He married in 1867 Miss Rosamond DeMoss,, who was born in Ohio and reared in Indiana. They have three sons and one daughter- Oscar Le Grand, James Francis, William Morton and Amy E. Mr. Dowell began his operations here with merely his knowledge of the business, and by dint of steady and persistent industry, now does a business of $5,000 a year in the line of general pottery work and tiling. George M. Dowell, father of A. H., is a native of Alabama, and settled in Muscatine County, Iowa, at the age of nineteen, where he was connected with pottery work till recently he came here. G. A. and J. W., brothers of A. H., are active workmen with him in the business. Mr. Dowell's enterprise gives employment to about eight skilled workmen.

F. M. FULKERSON, proprietor and owner of the " Gold Dust Mill" and water power, Lowell, was born in Wayne County, Penn., 1852, and settled here with his people in 1865, where he was identified with farming and stock-raising till 1876, when he engaged at his present industry, which he has successfully carried on since. In 1870, he married Miss Emma Lamb, a native of North Carolina, whose people settled here about 1866. They have a family of one son and a daughter-Arthur and Evelyn. The mill is located at the mouth of Shoal Creek, at its confluence with Spring River; is run by water power of almost unlimited capacity. The mill is a two story and basement building 6Ox6O, has two run of stone and grinds 400 bushels a day. His trade is exclusively merchant trade, his special brands being Anchor, Lily White and May Queen. Mr. Fulkerson, since taking charge of the mill, has made an entire improvement upon its capacity and machinery, from what it was established upon in 1868.

JACOB HOFFMAN, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 31, P. 0. Lowell, was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1828, and came to America in 1837 with his people, who settled in Coshocton County, Ohio. He was engaged in the hardware and tinware business in the State for a few years, after which he engaged in farming and stock-raising, and carried it on actively in Ohio until 1869, when he came here and has been actively identified with his present industry since. In 1862, be was married in Holmes County, Ohio, to Miss Sarah J. Harris, who was born and reared in Holmes County. They have a family of two sons and two daughters living- Elmer W., Mary E., Della M., Edgar A. He has been an active member of the F. & A. M. Society for the last twenty-five years. He and his family are active members and supporters of the Methodist Church here. His farm contains 117 acres of improved land, well fenced, watered and stocked; nice dwellings, barns and stables, and a nice orchard of about 400 trees, of a full variety of fruit.

S. D. OSBORN, Postmaster and general merchandise, Varck, was born in Hendricks County, Ind., in 1856, and located here in 1872, and engaged in farming and stock-raising, with which he has been actively identified since. In May 1, 1881, he engaged at his mercantile business, and has successfully carried it on since. In September, 1880, he married Miss Jennie Carr, who was born in Ohio, in 1857. They have one little boy- Orval. The farm contains eighty acres of improved land, a nice orchard of fifteen acres of a nicely assorted variety of apple, peach, pear trees, etc., good buildings and stables. He is an active member of the Church of Friends.

M. L. SMITH, merchant, was born and reared in Jasper County, Mo., and settled in this county and State in 1866, at the age of twenty-two, and engaged at the farming and stock-raising industry, and has been successfully identified with that industry since. In 1874, he engaged in the mercantile business, and has been actively connected with that industry since. In 1866, he married Miss Mary L. E. Kelly, a native of Madison County, Mo. They have a family of one son and a daughter-John F. and Nancy J. Mr. Smith did active service in Company M, Ninth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, from its organization till its muster-out; was honorably discharged. He has worked actively in the development of the social and industrial life of this locality since coming here. Is a member of the A. O. U. W., Society.

ERNST YOAS, coffin manufacturer, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Lowell, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1828, and came to America in 1840 with his adopted parents, who settled in Ripley County, Ind. At the age of twenty he learned the carpentering trade in Cincinnati, Ohio, and has been almost continuously identified with the mechanical business since. In 1866, he located here, and has been actively connected with his present industries since. In 1856, he married Miss Lucy Ann Hibbard, who was born and reared in Athens County, Ohio. They have a family of three sons-Charles S., James M., Clarence F. His farm contains eighty acres of improved land, well fenced and stocked, etc.

LOWELL TOWNSHIP.

HON. H. R. HUBBARD, farming, stock-raising, and milling, P. 0. Boston Mills, was born in Hartford County, Conn., in 1838, and was reared in Illinois, where he was engaged in farming till the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted his services in defense of the "Union,"' and did active and honorable duty in the Volunteers, and subsequently in the Veterans till the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged with the rank of Captain, which he had meritoriously obtained. In 1866, he located here, and has been active in connection with farming and stock-raising since. In 1872, he married Miss Charlotte A. Peters, who was born in Perry County, Ohio, in 1840, and who located here with her people, in 1866. They have a family of two daughters and one son- Daisy C., Lucy A. and Hubert H. Mr. Hubbard has always taken an active part in the development and growth of the public, social and industrial life of his locality. He has represented his district in the Legislative Assembly of the State, and has filled many minor county and municipal positions. He and his family are active members of the Congregational Church. He is an active member of Frank Blair Post, G. A. R. No. 54.

WILLIAM JESSUP, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 7, P. 0. Quakervale, was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1830, and was identified with farming in Grant County, Ind., until 1853, when he located in Warren County, Iowa, and carried on farming there until 1866, when he came here and has been actively connected with his present industry since. In 1852, he married Abigail Lee, a native of Wayne County Ind., who departed this life in 1876, and is buried in Quakervale Cemetery, aged forty-six, leaving a family of three sons and five daughters- John R., Rosana, Hannah J., Lydia A., Celia M., Charles W., Mary I. and William H. In 1878, he married Mary Cox, who was born in North Carolina, and reared in Wayne County, Ind. They have one daughter- Aletha M. His farm residence contains 80 acres of improved land, well stocked and watered, an orchard of 300 nicely assorted fruit trees, and good buildings etc. He also owns 160 acres on Section 35, Crawford Township, his first residence This farm is well improved, and has a nice orchard of 800 assorted fruit trees, and good buildings. William Jessup has been an active worker in the development of the social and industrial life of his locality since coming here, and he and his family are active members of the Church of Friends.

CRAWFORD TOWNSHIP.

R. H. ANDERSON, farmer, Section 36, P 0. Columbus, was born in Indiana, June 9, 1843. He farmed until 1862, when he went into the army, and was discharged at the end of nine months, on account of disabilities. He then resumed farming, which be continued three years, when he came to Kansas and located in his present home. He bought 160 acres of railroad lands and improved it, now raising stock and grain, and also fine selections of all kinds of fruits. He was married to Miss Mary E. Young, of Indiana, in 1863. They have three children-Amos J., Charley W. and Laura S.

JUDGE WILLIAM BAKER, No. 9, farmer, Section 10, P. 0. Columbus, was born in New York State in 1837. He received a common school education and began farming in Illinois in 1859. He enlisted in the army in 1861, and was mustered out in 1864. He re-enlisted as veteran in 1864, and served until 1865, when he returned to New York State and lived on a farm until 1867. He was then in Illinois six months, and came to Kansas in 1867, locating on his present farm of 160 acres, which he improved, and is now running as grain and stock farm, and has also a fine line of all kinds of fruits and berries. He is now serving as Justice of the Peace for the third term. Is District Treasurer and also member of Presbyterian Church, of which he is Elder, and was the first ordained in the church. Judge Baker organized a Sabbath school in School District 85, and was superintendent of same. He was married to Miss E. A. Ward, of New York State, in 1865, and has two children- Cornelia C. and Ida May. Willie, deceased.

WILLIAM M. BENSON, son of Samuel and Martha Benson, was born September 20, 1830, in Warren County, Ind., then a wild and sparsely settled portion of the State. The red man, not having been removed, was still an inhabitant of the forest. He received his rudimental education in the " Old Log School-house," in the days when a boy was considered about perfect if he could spell his teacher down in the old elementary spelling book and cipher as far as the Single Rural of Three in Pike's arithmetic. At the age of twenty, he entered college and received a scientific education. Loving an independent life, he chose farming as his profession, and for twenty-five years farmed during the summer and taught school during the winter. He married Miss Malinda P. Slauter, September 26, 1853, by whom he had six children- Martha Marinda, Cynthia Ann, Samuel L., William Willard, Rosalie and Osie Theodoshie. He came to Cherokee County in the summer of 1876 and spent five months in looking up a location and returned to Indiana. Returned to Kansas in the Spring of 1877, purchased lands, built a house and moved his family the following winter; he arrived at Columbus March 15, 1878. Mr. Benson opened and improved a farm of 540 acres, which he now runs as a grain and stock farm; he has also a full line of fruits. He has 400 acres under good cultivation, plenty of good stock and stock water. He was burned out December 13, 1879. His house, furniture, clothing and a valuable library of rare and excellent books, which he had been collecting for forty years, were entirely consumed. The loss was total, the property not being insured. He immediately re-built near the site of the former building a more beautiful and commodious residence. Mr. Benson has held several offices of trust, is a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the I. O. O. F.

GEORGE WILLIAM CRAWFORD, farmer, Section 36, P. O. Columbus, was born in Pennsylvania September 30, 1846. He lived on the farm until 1864, when he went to Montana and mined two years, then back to Iowa and went to school a short time, and went from there to Cherokee County, Kan., in 1867. He took a claim of 160 acres, which he opened and improved, and now raises stock and grain and has a good selection of fruits of all kinds. He has been elected School Director and appointed School Treasurer and is a member of the Land League. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Wood, of Indiana, in 1871, and has five children- Gertrude A., Nancy V., William Carl, Amos P. and Vida Mabel.

JOHN DEMUTH, farmer, Section 17, P. 0. Columbus, was born in Pennsylvania, January 24, 1832, and raised on a farm in same State. He moved to Illinois at the age of twenty-two, remaining on a farm in that State ten years. He came to Kansas in 1865 and located in Franklin County, farmed in this and other counties five years, and then came to Cherokee County and opened up a farm, which he sold out, and in 1874 opened his present farm. He raises grain and stock and has a fine selection of fruits and berries of all kinds. He was married to Miss Sarah Whipple, of Pennsylvania, and has two children living, Oridela and Mary Alice, and Joseph A. and Jessie, deceased.

A. FLYNN, farmer, Section 6, P. O. Columbus, was born in England, June 15, 1815. He went to Ireland and remained ten years and then returned to England, where be attended Sunday school and night school twelve years. He then went to Scotland and worked two years in a Mill; then returned again to England and was employed on a railrad [sic] two years. He was then employed seven years on a railroad in France, and was in Africa during the time of Louis Phillippe three years and six months, and on his return remained in France two years, coming to the United States in 1855. He was two years in New Orleans in a sugar refinery, was next in St. Louis eighteen months, then in Alton two years, then worked for the Chicago, St. Louis & Alton Railroad nineteen years and came to Kansas in 1871. He located on his present farm of 320 acres, which is now run as a stock and grain farm, and has also a good assortment of fruits and berries. He was married to Miss Bridget Cane, of England, and has four children- James, Cornelius A., Mary A. and Thomas.

JAMES B. JONES, the subject of the following biography, was born December 25, 1825, in Hamilton County, Ohio, and at the age of seven emigrated with his parents to Montgomery County, Ind., where he aided them upon the farm until 1836, when his father, George W. Jones, died, and the following year James emigrated with his mother and family to Iowa, where again he aided his mother on the farm until the year 1846. In 1849, emigrated overland to California, where he remained in the mines until the year 1852, when he returned by way of Central America to Louisa County, Iowa, and in 1853 was married to Hettie Key, of Iowa, and in 1854, engaged in the mercantile business. Quit the business the following year and commenced clerking in a store, when he was discharged for disability. He then emigrated to Omaha, Neb., and emigrated the following year Boice City, Idaho Territory. The following year he returned to Kansas City, Mo., where he remained until the year 1869, when he came to Kansas and located on his present farm of 160 acres, which he opened and improved. He is engaged in raising stock and grain and has a good supply of all kinds of fruits. They have four living children- Charlotte, Frances, James B., Jr., and Gustavus, and have lost four sons and one daughter- Ralph P., Hortense, Oscar A., William and Joseph.

WILLIAM LOSER, farmer, Section 21, P. O. Columbus, was born in Indiana, August 19 1848. He began farming in Illinois at the age of twenty-one, and continued twelve years, coming to Kansas in 1881, where he bought his present home of eighty acres. He raises stock, grain and fruit. He is Justice of the Peace, School Director and Treasurer. He was married to Miss Mary A. Beven, of Ohio, in 1870. They have five children- Albert, Bell, Ozro, Ethel and William.

LINDLEY M. PICKERING, farmer, Section 27, P. O. Columbus was born in Indiana in 1835, son of Jonathan E., and grandson of Jacob Pickering, of Virginia. He received a high school education, and at the age of eighteen took charge of a store in Iowa, working as a salesman for fifteen years, in the meantime attending Byant & Stratton's Commercial College, at Chicago, from which he graduated in 1857. He spent one year in the South, handling stock and one year buying and selling grain, and located on his present farm in 1868. Since locating in Kansas, he has been in the Government employ, as Superintendent of Farming for various tribes of Indians in the Indian Territory, for five years. He is now devoting all his time to the improvement of his farm and the growing of stock. Mr. Pickering was employed by Mrs. Comstock and the Board of Directors of the Agricultural and Industrial Institute for the Colored Race, as its Superintendent, in which capacity he served for two years. During this time, his farm had been in charge of his son, Clifton H. He was married to Susan Haskit, in Iowa, in 1859. They have three children-Clifton H., Ina R. and Jessie Fremont, aged respectively twenty-two, twenty and seventeen. They are member of the religious Society of Friends, and he is in politics a radical Republican.

J. F. PITZER, farmer, Section 1, P. O. Columbus, was born in Ohio, August 21, 1813. He began farming in 1829, and continued it sixteen years, and was then engaged in milling business for six years. He was in the Mexican war fifteen months, and after his return farmed two years, when, on account of weak eyes, he was compelled to retire from business thirteen years. He then went to Southern Illinois, and built a mill 80x184, three stories high, which he operated six years, and then farmed three years in Illinois. He came to Kansas in 1867, and settled near Columbus, being two years in cattle business. He then moved to Columbus and built houses to rent three years, and was then in drug business six years. He bought a farm for his son and stocked it with forty-two mules, two span of horses, three cows, eighty hogs, wagons, buggies and farm machinery, and bought his present home of forty acres in 1881. The farm of forty acres is run solely as a fruit farm. It contains 1,200 apple trees, 140 cherries, 120 plum, peaches and pears, grapes and all other fruits and berries. He was married to Miss Sarah Kite, of Ohio, in 1836. They have six children- Eveline, Elizabeth, Drucilla, Arvilla, Alldica and Anthony J.

JOHN STAUFFER, farmer, Section 19, P. 0. Columbus, was born in Ohio December 30, 1833. He received a liberal school education and began work as a carpenter at the age of twenty-one years. He continued this occupation seven years, then farmed in Indiana until 1869, at which time he came to Kansas and located on Section 9, taking a claim of 160 acres. A part of this is now improved, and he is now raising stock and grain, and has on his farm a full line of all kinds of fruits. He owns a house and lot in Columbus, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church in that place. He was elected Township Trustee of Crawford Township in 1872, and saved his township $20,000 by not giving up railroad bonds, when the road was not completed, or when the railroad company had not complied with its contract. He was married to Miss Elizabeth King, of Indiana, in 1856. They have five children- James King, Samuel Kelly, John William, Millie Kennet, Thadeous Stephens.

ZEBINA WILLIAMS (deceased), was born in the State of New York, March 25, 1815. He was raised on a farm, and received a collegiate education, and at the age of twenty-one years he emigrated to Iowa. In the spring of 1836, he and his brother took claims in Louisa County, and proceeded to improve them. Iowa was very new at this time. The Indians, who were of the Misquakee, Fox and Sac tribes, were very numerous. Zebina and his brother built log cabins on their claims, and batched together. At three different times, while they were out making rails, the Indians entered their cabin, taking all their provisions and most of their clothing, at one time leaving them coatless in the dead of winter. More than a month elapsed at a time, that they never saw a white man, their only companions being wild beasts and the still wilder Indians. Such hardships as these laid the foundation of wealth and affluence. In the year 1850, he went overland to California, and mined for gold eighteen months, then returned to Iowa, on his farm, remaining until 1866, when he came to Kansas and settled on the present homestead of his widow and family. His farm in Kansas consisted 160 acres, which he brought to a high state of cultivation, having a fine nursery and choice fruits of all kinds. And he also still owned, in Iowa a section of' land, and 600 acres in Missouri up to the time of his death. Mr. Williams died April 14, 1871. He was a member of the Christian Church, a useful and respected member of the community, and an earnest worker in the church and Sunday school. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Hall, May 2, 1844. They have had eight children- Oscar N., Olive J., Zebina S., Mercy A., Edward C., Mary E., Ida F. (deceased), and Robert A. Williams.

MINERAL TOWNSHIP.

JAMES CASE, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 33, P. 0. Columbus, was born near Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1839. When he was ten years of age, his people removed to Jackson County, Ohio, where he was reared to the farming industry. He was identified in that State with farming and stock-raising till 1871, when he came here, and has successfully carried on that business since. His farms consist of 160 acres in Section 4, Crawford Township, and 160 acres in Section 33, Mineral Township, all under a thorough state of cultivation, and well furnished with buildings; a beautiful orchard of 500 apple trees, 150 peach trees, apricots, and all kinds of fruit grown here, and all in full bearing- an evidence of his thrift and enterprise since locating here. He was married in Jackson County, Ohio, to Miss Nancy McKinnis, of Jackson County, who departed this life March 9, 1881, and is buried in Lone Elm Cemetery, Cherokee Township, leaving a family of three sons and four daughters living- Charles W., Frances S., Oscar, Reuben, Sophia, Ellen and Elethea, and George, who is buried beside the mother in the family cemetery.

WILLIAM CALVERLEY, farmer, Section 34, P. 0. Columbus, was born in England, July 4, 1821. He came to United States in 1848, landing at New Orleans, from whence he went to Illinois and remained until the spring of 1866, at which time he came to Kansas, in the mean time having traded in cattle ten years. On arrival in Kansas he bought 160 acres of land, which he improved, and is now raising stock and grain and farming generally; also trading in cattle. He owns other farming land in the county. He was married to Miss Jane Proctor, of England, in 1844, and has had two children- John R., William H. (deceased).

HENRY CALVERLEY, farmer, Section 35, P. 0. Columbus, was born in England in 1830, and came to the United States in 1848. He was engaged in trading and farming in Illinois and Iowa ten or twelve years, and in 1870 came to Kansas and located his present home, and opened and improved a farm. He improved two quarter-sections and now raises stock and grain with a good supply of all kinds of fruits. He was married to Miss Angeline Morgan, of Iowa, in 1857. They have four children-Lizzie, Willie, Guy and Clara. They lost one son, Robert.

SCAMMONVILLE.

ARTHUR C. PERRY, superintendent of mercantile department of Keith & Perry Shafts, was born in England, 1861, coming to United States in 1879. He received a mercantile education. He was at Oscoda in coal business one year, was for next eighteen months engaged in bookkeeping for coal firm at Fort Scott, and in 1882 came to Scammonville. He here took charge of his business He owns Shafts 102 and 103. Owns mines at Oscoda and Mulberry Grove and at Rich Hill. They mine about 200,000 bushels each month, employing from 250 to 300 men. He owns one and a half sections of fine coal land, which is inexhaustible. The company store sells about $4,500 worth per month. The company owns about fifty tenement houses.

[TOC] [part 14] [Cutler's History]