KANSAS COLLECTION BOOKS

William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas


BROWN COUNTY, Part 27

[TOC] [part 28] [part 26] [Cutler's History]

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - HAMLIN TOWNSHIP (HILLMON - UNKEFER).

JOHN McLEAN HILLMON, farmer and stock raiser, Section 4, Township 1, Range 16, P. O. Hamlin, was born in Montgomery County, Ind., January 29, 1834, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year, when he removed to Tama County, Iowa, where he resided until the spring of 1857, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating at Valley Falls, where he resided until the fall of the same year, when he removed to the city of Hiawatha, coming there when there was only one house besides his own in this now thriving city. He resided in Hiawatha until 1860, when he removed to Illinois, where he spent the winter, and then removed to Iowa, where, on the 10th day of August, 1861, he entered the United States Army, as a member of Company C, Tenth Regiment Iowa Infantry, enlisting at Toledo, Iowa, and being discharged at Little Rock, Ark., August 15, 1865. He participated in the battles of Island No. 10, Madrid, Corinth, Iuka, Port Gibson, Jackson, Miss., Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg, Chattanooga, siege of Atlanta, Sherman's March to the Sea, capture of Savannah, Goldsboro, Raleigh, N. C. Mr. Hillmou (sic) received severe injuries while in the service, which resulted in almost total blindness, for which a grateful (?) country is now allowing him the pitiful sum of $4 per month. After his discharge from the army he returned to his home in Iowa, where he resided until 1868, when he returned to Kansas, again locating at Hiawatha, where he resided until March, 1881, when he removed to his farm in Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 35, A. F. & A. M., Mount Horeb Chapter and Hiawatha Commandery, No. 13, K. T. He was senior warden of his lodge nine years, and W. M. one year. Mr. Hillmon is a true blue Democrat, and has never sought any political offices. He was married in Helena, Iowa, February 24, 1868, to Miss Harriet E. Louthan, a native of Ohio. They have five children living - Eureka R., Thomas B., John W., Mary E., and Ester Florence. Mr. Hillmon owns a choice farm of 160 acres lying on Pony Creek. He has 50 acres of timber, and the remainder of the farm is about equally divided between bottom and upland. The farm is all enclosed, and is in a good state of cultivation; is supplied by wells and Pony Creek with plenty of good water; has a handsome grove and orchards, and has it finely improved. There is a substantial stone house of seven rooms, a stock stable, granary, and other outbuildings on the premises. Mr. H. devotes his attention principally to raising corn and hogs. He grows 3,000 to 4,000 bushels of corn yearly, keeps half a dozen fine grade cattle, 35 stock hogs, and 5 head of horses. Mr. Hillmon is a veteran of the late war, an industrious, intelligent and prosperous farmer, and a good and useful citizen.

JOHN C. McGEE, senior member of the firm of McGee & Stearns, druggists, and dealers in books, stationery, fancy articles, cigars, tobacco, etc., Hamlin. Was born in vermillion County, Ill., March 3, 1838, and lived in his native State until his fifth year, his parents removing in the fall of 1845 to Davies County, Mo., where Mr. McGee resided until 1860, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Doniphan County, where he resided until 1876, when he removed to Hamlin, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hamlin Lodge, No. 154, I. O. O. F., and is treasurer of his lodge. He was Constable of the city of Severance four years, and Justice of the Peace of Hamlin Township one term. He was married, in 1875, at Severance, to Miss Rachel M. VanCuren, a native of Indiana. Mrs. McGee is an old resident of Brown County and of Kansas, her parents having removed to this State in 1854. She relates many graphic tales of the early history of the Territory and State. Mr. McGee is among the foremost business men of Hamlin, does a safe and thriving trade, and is a steady, reliable and educated pharmacist.

V. B. MOORE, agent and operator, Reserve, is the son of Dr. W. E. and M. E. Moore, and was born in Clinton County, Mo., May 8, 1863, living but a short time in his native State, when his parents removed to Kansas, locating in Mount Pleasant, Atchison County, where the family resided eight years, then removed to Hamlin, Brown County, where his parents reside at present. Mr. M. received his education in the graded schools of Hamlin, and learned telegraphy from Mr. Al. Wheeler, then agent and operator at Hamlin Station. Immediately after completing his course of instruction, under the direction of Mr. Wheeler, Mr. Moore was assigned as operator to the station at Severance on the St. Joe & Western R. R., where he remained about one year. He was then appointed agent and operator at Reserve, Brown County, on the Missouri Pacific R. R., which position he has held ever since. He is a member of Hamlin Lodge, I. O. G. T. Mr. Moore is a faithful and trusted employee of the railroad company, and is very popular in Reserve.

PETER PFEIFFER, farmer, Section 1, Township 2, Range 16 west, P. O. Hamlin, was born in Germany, September 17, 1838, at Frankfort on the Maine. He came to the United States in 1853, his destination Boston, where his brother, Paul, had preceded (sic) him in 1848. Three years later Peter came to Kansas, located at Fort Leavenworth, and accepted a position under the Government as Wagon Master. Here he remained until the close of the Rebellion, and during this trying time acted as messenger through the Confederate lines to the Union Army, and was in the city of Lawrence at the second burning of the same by the border ruffians. In 1865, he settled on the place where he now resides, where he has 320 acres, all under improvements, which makes a very fine farm indeed. Mr. Pfeiffer is a gentleman who has always taken an active part in the public welfare of his county and State, as he came here with the intention to help free Kansas, if such a thing were possible. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Hamlin, also Hamlin Lodge, No. 185, A., F. & A. M. He was married, in 1865, to Mary, daughter of Daniel McCoy, who became a resident of Brown County in 1857.

[Image of R. Patton] ROBERT PATTON, M. D., farmer and stock raiser, Section 21, Township 1, Range 16, P. O. Hamlin, was born in Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1823, and lived in his native State until his fifteenth year, when he went to Canandaigua, N. Y., where he attended the well known academy located in the town, for two years. He then commenced reading medicine with Dr. P. G. Munson, an eminent practitioner of Canandaigua, a former partner of Prof. Frank Hastings Hamilton. He pursued his medical studies under the direction of Dr. Munson, for nearly two years. He then proceeded to Crittenden, Ky., where he completed his medical studies and then attended lectures at the Philadelphia College of Medicine, where he graduated in 1853. Immediately after his graduation he commenced the practice of his profession in Clark County, Ky., where he resided a short time and then removed to Bourbon County, in the same State, where he continued the practice of his profession and where he resided until the fall of 1861, when he entered the United States army, as an acting Assistant Surgeon, in which position he served almost continuously until the close of the war, and then returned to Kentucky, where he resided until January, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a prominent and zealous member of the Christian Church of Hamlin. He was married in Flemingsburgh, Ky., in 1856, to Mrs. Julia A. Groves, nee Hall, a native of Kentucky. Dr. P. is the son of John H. and Eliza Jane Patton, and is one of a family of seventeen children, who are all living but three, in various portions of the United States. Dr. Patton's "Broadlawn" farm and herd, are among the attractions in this part of the county, and are worth a day's journey to see. The home farm and neighboring lands belonging to this estate, embrace 640 acres, admirably watered by springs and living brooks. The estate is improved with some ten miles of fine hedge, large timothy and cover meadow and natural pastures, fast running to blue grass. He has a beautiful home, set in ample blue-grass (sic) lawns, shaded by large native groves, has a dwelling house on every quarter of his farm for the occupancy of his workmen, and a cattle barn 200 feet long for foraging and stabling, twenty-five acres of trees and orchard. In addition to his old herd of thoroughbred short-horns, the doctor has lately purchased and brought up from Kentucky, twenty-five short-horns, mostly of popular families, has at the head of the "Broadlawn" herd, Wiley Duke, No. 11,532, a pure bred Bates bull, an animal of superior personal traits and illustrious lineage, sired by Kirklevington Duke 2d, dam Wiley Duchess. Wiley Duke is sixth from Miss Wiley 2d, from which is descended the celebrated Loudons of Kentucky. Wiley Duke's dam was sired by Duke Oneida, and the latter by Duke of Geneva, from the tenth Duchess of Geneva, which sold for $35,000. The doctor with his new acquisitions and especially with Wiley Duke, will build up a herd worthy of his noble estate and Brown County. He has lived the most of his past life in the Blue Grass Region; is a man of decided enterprise; is doing a work for advanced stock husbandry; is enthusiastic over this country and is one of its most honorable and public spirited men.

JACOB REASONER, farmer and stock raiser, Section 22, Township 1, Range 16, P. O. Reserve, senior member of the firm of Reasoner Bros., dealers in lumber, building materials, lime, hardware, dry goods and groceries, etc., was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, January 15, 1839, and lived in his native State until April, 1869, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on his farm in Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a prominent and consistent member of the Christian Church, and of Hamlin Lodge, No. 185, A., F. & A. M., Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 13, and Hiawatha Commandery, Knights Templar. He participated in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company D, Thirty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Oak Hill, Jackson Co., Ohio, July 24, 1861, and was honorably discharged at Cumberland, Md., January 10, 1865. He entered his company as a private, and was mustered out as First Lieutenant and Adjutant of his regiment. He took part in the battles of Lewisburg, W. Va., second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Cloyd (sic) Mountain, W. Va., Lynchburg, Kernstown, Berryville, Opequan, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, and other minor engagements and skirmishes. He was married, October 11, 1866, at Jackson, Ohio, to Miss Sarah M. Staley, a native of Virginia. They have five children living, whose names are: Frederic, Kenton, Bertha, Alden Edward, Charles Hayes, and Chandos. Mr. Reasoner owns a fine upland farm of 240 acres. It is all enclosed by good fences, is in a high state of cultivation, and is abundantly supplied with pure water. The orchard covers five acres, and contains 300 bearing apple, 1,000 peach, and a number of pear, plum and cherry trees. The improvements are good, and comprise, among others, a five-room, cosy and comfortable dwelling, surrounded by handsome shade trees; a frame barn, 24x40; granary, corn cribs, etc. Mr. Reasoner raises 5,000 bushels of corn, 1,200 to 1,500 bushels of small grains, yearly; feeds two car loads of cattle, keeps twenty-five to forty stock cattle, 100 to 150 Poland-China hogs, and eight head of horses. Mr. Reasoner and his brother, Milton, comprise the new firm of Reasoner Bros. They are extensive dealers in general merchandise, lumber, hardware, dry goods, groceries, etc. etc., in the new and thriving town of Reserve, which was only laid out in August, 1882, and already contains a drug store, two general stores, a lumber yard, hotel and livery stable, an elevator, and from a dozen to fifteen dwelling houses; Reasoner Bros. are the most prominent and pushing dealers in the town. They own their own buildings, enjoy excellent credit, are doing a large and constantly increasing trade, and are strong, popular men.

CHARLES M. SPRAGUE, farmer and stock raiser, Section 31, Township 1, Range 15 P. O. Morrill, was born in Gallia County, Ohio, March 9, 1838, and lived in his native State until his eighth year, when his parents removed to Hancock County, Ill., where Mr. Sprague resided until April 1, 1858, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in Hiawatha, Brown County, where he resided until the spring of 1860, when he went to Colorado, where he was engaged in mining and prospecting, and where he resided until September, 1862, when he became a member of Company F, Second Regiment Colorado Volunteer Cavalry, enlisting in Denver, Colorado, and was discharged at Fort Rile, Kansas, July 6, 1865. He participated in the battles of Independence and Westport, Mo., and numerous minor engagements. In the spring of 1863 Mr. Sprague and twenty-four of his comrades were selected by the Colonel of his regiment to act as independent scouts in Missouri near Kansas City. He continued in this service about a year, and during this time had many engagements with the rebel bushwhackers who infested this region. He is a member of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. and of Star of Hope Lodge No. 1338, Knights of Honor. He was married in Brown County, in September, 1867, to Miss Ophelia Frink, a native of Pennsylvania. They have seven children living, whose names are - Adelbert, Lorena, Prestis, Frank, Oliver, Sarah and Charles Jr. Mr. Sprague owns a fine upland farm of 260 acres, all enclosed, in a good state of cultivation and well supplied with water, by means of wells, springs. Terrapin Creek, which flows along the north line, and Sprague's branch of the Terrapin, which flows through the north quarter of Forest Grove Stock Farm, as this handsome estate is called. The orchard covers seven acres and contains 300 apple, 400 peach and a number of pear, plum and cherry trees. The improvements are first-class, embracing, among others, an elegant and commodious ten room dwelling, surrounded by handsome shade trees, shrubbery and evergreens, large groves, a frame barn, two good granaries, corn cribs, stock sheds and lots, etc. Mr. Sprague raises 1,000 bushels of small grain, 6,000 to 7,000 bushels of corn, cuts forty acres of hay yearly, feeds two car loads of cattle, keeps fifty to seventy-five head of fine grade cattle, 100 to 150 head of hogs, and eight head of work horses. Mr. Sprague is an energetic and practiced farmer and stock breeder, a prominent citizen, a genial (sic) man, warm and constant in his friendships.

JAMES STUMBO, farmer and stock raiser, northeast of Section 5, Township 1, Range 16, P. O. Falls City, Neb., was born on Elk River, in Braxton County, W. Va., April 14, 1818, but lived in his native State but a short time, his parents removing to Lawrence County, Ohio, where Mr. S. lived until May 1, 1856, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating on Pony Creek, Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He participated in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company L, Second Regiment Nebraska Cavalry, enlisting in Falls City, Neb., March 5, 1863, and was discharged in the same city December 24, 1863. Mr. Stumbo also gave two of his sons to the Union cause. The eldest, Charles D., was a member of Company D, Eighth Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted in Hamlin township in the fall of 1861, and was discharged for disability at Fort Leavenworth in January, 1862. He subsequently re-enlisted as a member of the Sixteenth Regiment Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, being enrolled on the 18th day of March, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth and was discharged at the same place August 8, 1865. He was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, and died form the effects of hardships endured while in the service, August 31, 1865, twenty-three days after his discharge. The second son, John J., was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, August 22, 1845, and was a member of Company L, Second Regiment Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry, enlisting at Falls City, Neb., March 1, 1863, and was discharged December 24, of the same year, in the same city. He subsequently re-enlisted as a member of the Seventh Regiment, Kansas Veteran Cavalry, being enrolled in March, 1864, in Hamlin Township and died while in the United States service at St. Louis in April of the same year. Both of these young men were patriotic, brave and faithful soldiers and laid down their lives that their country might live. Mr. Stumbo has been a member of the School Board of District No. 15, Brown County, for twenty-two years. He was married in Lawrence County, Ohio, July 14, 1842, to Miss Mary A. Powell, a native of Ohio. They have eight children living - Mary L., married to Washington Winters, a native of Indiana; Uriah P., married to Sarah A. Morrison, a native of Illinois; Reuben V., married to Miss Jane E. Morrison, a native of Illinois; Margaret, married to Reuben Messler, a native of Illinois; George W., married to Miss Jennie Frederics, a native of Michigan; Albert, Edward, Frank and Alice. Mr. S. is the fortunate owner of a fine farm of 434 acres. It has 100 acres in timber and the remainder about equally divided between bottom and upland. The farm is in a good state of cultivation, is all enclosed, and is supplied with water by means of wells, springs and Pony Creek, which flows in a northerly direction through the farm. There is a young and thrifty orchard on the property which contains 500 fruit trees of various kinds. The improvements are good and consist in part of a seven roomed frame cottage situated on the northeast of Section 5, while on the northeast of Section 4, is a large stone dwelling containing seven rooms, a stone barn 30x53, seventeen feet high, granaries, corn cribs, stock sheds and lots, etc., etc. Mr. S. grows 1,200 to 1,500 bushels of small grain, 5,000 to 6,000 bushels of corn, feeds a car load of cattle, keeps 50 to 75 stock cattle, 60 hogs and 20 head of horses. He has a fine quarry of building stone on his farm and lately discovered a vein of coal on the property which as far as developed has shown a thickness of eight inches. He is an old pioneer of the State and an honest, industrious and prosperous farmer and a good and useful citizen.

SAMUEL SWEENEY, proprietor of Hamlin restaurant, and dealer in groceries, confectionary, etc., was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, September 17, 1840, and lived in his native State until 1857, when his parents removed to Albia, Monroe Co., Iowa, where Mr. S. resided until the fall of 1870, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in what is now Smith County, being among the earliest settlers of this county. He resided in this county until 1875, and then removed to Hamlin Township, Brown County, where he has resided since. He is a member of Hamlin Lodge, No. 154, I. O. of O. F. He has been P. S. of, and is at present one of the Trustees of this Lodge. He took part in the War of the Rebellion as a member of Company E, Sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted at Burlington, Iowa, June 23, 1861, and was discharged July 16, 1864, at Davenport, Iowa. He was a faithful and meritorious soldier, and endured great hardships, and contracted rheumatism, from which he has suffered ever since. He participated in the battles of Black River, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., Corinth, and other minor engagements and skirmishes. He was married in Platt County, Ill., March 5, 1874, to Miss Mollie Tipton, a native of Hancock County, Ill. Mr. Sweeney is an honest, straightforward and thorough business man, and is well and favorably known for his strict integrity.

WILLIAM WALLER THOMSON, barber and hair dresser, Hamlin, is the son of John Rochester and Mary L. Thomson, and was born in Pendleton County, Ky., July 19, 1858. His father was a prominent farmer and extensive stock dealer, and resided in Pendleton County, Ky., until the subject of this sketch had attained the age of four years. The family then removed to Flemingsburgh, in the same State, where, when Mr. T. had reached the age of ten years, his father died, leaving a widow and five chidren (sic). Mr. Thomson was educated in the public schools of Flemingsburgh, which he attended until he was seventeen years old. He then engaged in the milling business with his uncle, William Elbridge Waller, in Flemingsburgh, where he resided one year, and was engaged in working at a planing mill. In April, 1879, Mr. T. became a resident of Kansas, locating in Hamlin Township, where he lived three years, and was engaged in farming. He then removed to Hiawatha, where he lived nine months, and was employed as an engineer at the Hiawatha Steam Flouring Mills, thence he came to Hamlin, where he has resided since and carried on business. He is a member of the Christian Church and of the I. O. of G. T. He is a young and enterprising business man, and bears a good reputation in the community in which he lives.

CHARLES E. TOBIE, proprietor of the Hamlin Steam flouring mill, Hamlin, was born in Utica, N. Y., in April, 1848, and lived in his native State until his twentieth year, when his parents removed to Keokuk, Iowa, where his father, Peter Tobie, had extensive contracts with the United States Government on the ship canal at this point. Mr. Tobie resided in Iowa until October 31, 1874, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in the city of Hiawatha, where he was employed a greater portion of the time in farming, and for one year was engaged in the Hiawatha steam flouring mills, owned by his brother, P. D. Tobie. In April, 1883, he purchased the Hamlin steam flouring mills which he operates at present. The mill was built in June, 1882, at a cost of $5,700 by Messrs. B. Ellis and John L. Smith. It is equipped with a full complement (sic) of modern machinery, including a forty-horse power engine, and three run of buhrs. The leading brands of flour manufactured at this mill are equal to any in the market and are known as "Golden Crown" and Lily of the Valley." Mr. Tobie intends to make extensive improvements shortly, and own a mill second to none in Brown County. Mr. T. gives his personal attention to the management of the mills and takes great pride in his valuable enterprise. He is a thorough business man, and the success of the mills is largely due to his energies.

FRANK M. UNKEFER, life, fire insurance and collection agent and Notary Public; agent for the Kansas Mutual, Phonix (sic) Fire of Brooklyn, N. Y., Springfield of Massachusetts, and North British Mercantile, Deputy Postmaster of Hamlin, bookkeeper and chief clerk in the extensive general mercantile establishment of Thomas C. Mathews. Hamlin (sic), was born October 29, 1844, in New Paris, Stark Co., Ohio, and lived in his native State until November, 1868, when he became a resident of Kansas, locating in the city of Atchison, where he was engaged in painting and where he resided one year. From this city he removed to Highland, Doniphan County, where he entered into the insurance business, lived three years, and then removed to Hiawatha, where he resided about five years and devoted his entire attention to the insurance and loan business. In June, 1876, he removed to Hamlin where he has resided since. He is a member of Hamlin Lodge No. 154, and Hiawatha Encampment No. 33, I. O. O. F., and of Hiawatha Post No. 130, G. A. R. Mr. U. has been representative to the Grand Lodge, I. O. of O. F., of the State of Kansas on three several occasions, once representing Hiawatha Lodge No. 38, of which he was a member at the time, and twice representing his own lodge at Hamlin. He was one of the charter members of Highland Lodge No. 67, and of Hamlin Lodge No. 154, the first N. G. of Hamlin Lodge, and was subsequently honored by a re-election to this important position. He was treasurer of this lodge three terms, and with the exception of one year, its D. G. M. since its organization. He has been Clerk of Hamlin Township three terms. Mr. Unkefer received his early education in the public schools of Champaign County, Ohio, and at North Lewisburg Academy in the same State. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted (August 20, 1861) at Urbana, Ohio, in Company A, Second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, served fourteen months, and at Murfreesboro, Tenn., was transferred to the United States Signal Corps. He served faithfully and meritoriously in this organization, until the expiration of his term of service, and was discharged at Chattanooga, Tenn., August 20, 1864. He then returned to his home in Ohio, and on the 23d day of January, 1865, enlisted at Columbus, Ohio, in Company D, One Hundred and Eighty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged, September 18, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. Among the battles in which he took part were Perryville, Ky., siege of Nashville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Lookout Mountain. Mr. U. was with Gen. O. M. Mitchell's independent command that left the army at Murfreesboro and, crossing the mountains to Huntsville, Ala., succeeded in capturing two trains, and cutting off communications between Memphis and Corinth, thus securing control of over one hundred miles of railroad and 150 miles of the Tennessee River. He also was with the Army of the Tennessee when it was forced to retreat to Louisville, Ky., and after the battle of Chickamauga, when the Union forces were entirely surrounded, the rebels having sent down rafts, breaking the pontoon bridges crossing the Tennessee River, Lieut. Reber, of the signal corps, formerly of Dayton, Ohio, Mr. U and another member of his corps, volunteered to open communications between Chattanooga and Stevenson, Ala. They were eminently successful in their design, after suffering incredible hardships, among others being forced to swim their horses across the Tennessee. While engaged on this duty, Mr. U. and his companions were the unwilling spectators of the burning and almost utter destruction of a Union supply train then on its way to Chattanooga, by the Rebel General, John Morgan. Subsequently, on the first day of January, 1863, one of the coldest days experienced that winter, while in the upper part of the Sequatchie Valley, Tenn., Mr. U. again volunteered, in company with three of his comrades of the signal corps, to deliver despatches (sic) of the utmost importance to the Commander of the loyal forces at McMinnville, Tenn. In carrying these despatches they successfully eluded 150 rebel bushwhackers, commanded by the notorious George Carter, scaled the steep and slippery sides of a spur of the Cumberland Mountains, then covered with ice and snow, and being forced for miles to drive their benumbed and half-frozen steeds before them, they finally reached their destination, delivered their despatches and returned to the Union lines in safety. Upon their return to camp, they were met and congratulated by the Lieutenant of their corps (Reber) who, evincing much emotion, exclaimed, "Thank God, boys, for your safe return! I never expected to meet you again." Mr. Unkefer was married in the city of Hiawatha, September 1, 1878, to Miss Hattie A. Dilling, a native of Blair County, Pa. They have one child, a son, whose name is Orlando D. Mr. Unkefer is a largehearted, manly man, and is highly esteemed for his sterling business and social qualities.

[TOC] [part 28] [part 26] [Cutler's History]