KANSAS COLLECTION ARTICLES




Kansas Fact and Fancy:  Trivia questions about Kansas history


Part Three


The following have been archived from the Internet mailing list, Kansas-L.

41. The Huron cemetery in Kansas City, Kansas recently made national news when Leonard Bearskin proposed to build a bingo hall above the graves. The city and state governments became apoplectic and a rider was attached to a bill in the U.S. Congress to prevent this sacrilege.
     This isn’t the first controversy that has involved the cemetery. In the early & middle part of this century, three sisters enjoyed great notoriety over actions they took that were directly related to the Huron cemetery.
   (A) Who were these sisters? (B) What was the controversy? (C) What national “first” did one of them achieve in 1909? Bonus question: How did the term “Huron” come about? (don’t have to answer this one to win.)

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42. Who was the first woman journalist graduated from KU and when. What was her home county and do you know her parents?

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43. Since the very name of our state derives from an Indian tribe, the Kansa, it seems appropriate to ask for the names of all the Kansas counties that are also named for Indian tribes.
     The bonus question is for the name of the only Kansas county that is named for an individual Indian.
     No extra credit will be earned for adding additional information, such as year of establishment or original county name, but you will impress everyone if you do so.

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44. Who were the "BLOODY BENDERS", and in what county did they gain their fame?

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45. Where and why is the 'Wind Gas Capital of the World'?

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46. I've heard of some interesting school teachers but none as tantalizing as William Quantrill. Quantrill once taught school in Kansas. In what town did he teach?

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47. With all of this travel talk, I'll stay in the same mode and ask about the Victory Highway, when was it opened and what do we know it as?

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48. How, when, and where did Mr. William Cody get the nickname "Buffalo Bill"?

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49. With all of the talk about brookville, I thought i'd ask if anyone knows either the name of the rooster or his owner who was used by warner pathe for the beginning of their newsreels around 1948.

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50. (1) What church is the oldest established church in the State still in use? (2) Who were the first white settlers in Wyndotte County and how did this church memorialize them? (3) Who is the first white settler buried in the cemetery owned by this church?

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51. Wyandotte County, Kansas is named for the Ouendat or Wyandot tribe of Indians, who were moved west from their original lands in Ohio and Michigan in 1842, and given 148,000 acres west of the Mississippi in exchange.
     1. What is the French nickname for the Wyandots, and why did the French bestow it upon them? (Hint: The cemetery below carries the name).
2. In a Treaty of January 31, 1855, the members of the Wyandot tribe lost all the lands they had received in 1842 (except for a "public burying-ground" now in downtown Kansas City, Kansas), and had their tribe dissolved. What did they receive in exchange?
3. As a result of the 1855 treaty and another in 1867 there are now two groups in the United States calling themselves the Wyandots. What are the full names of each of these Wyandot tribes?
4. What disagreement has existed for over 100 years between these two groups over the burial grounds described above, and what is the nature of the most recent manifestation of that disagreement, arising in 1994-1997?

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52. What Kansas town is named for the Spanish word for cement and why?

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53. What is the state insect of Kansas?

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54. Something happened in Sedgwick County, Kansas, on May 26, 1917. This happens in other places, too, and at different times (important enough to be recorded on the Internet); but the only other Sedgwick County listing was also on a May 26--May 26, 1973. What was it?

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55. Since the glass factories in Independence were mentioned not long ago, I'll take my question from there. by 1910 there were 25 glass factories in this southeast Kkansas area. What brought this industry to that location in shortly after 1900?

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56. On August 25, 1855, Kansas Territorial Governor Woodson issued a proclamation creating Arapahoe County within the Kansas Territory. That Kansas County no longer exists, but a constitutional convention was held in one of the towns in Arahapoe County in 1859. What was the name of the town and what was the constitution which was the subject of the convention?

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57. With a full moon AND Hallowe'en just around the corner, I thought y'all might enjoy this trivia question:
     Kansas has its share of ghost stories -- rumors of mysterious lights, phantom trains, restless spirits. Some of these stories began in harrowing circumstances, scenes of illness or murder or abandonment. But this particular one began under much happier circumstances.
     I imagine none of the Kansas folks assembled that fall afternoon years ago suspected anything tragic was about to occur. They were there to see a football game, to see the hometown boys do good and show the visiting team how the game of football was supposed to be played. But Death stood nearby, waiting ...
     It must have been early in the game that it happened -- a young football player, injured on the field -- perhaps those watching at first didn't realize quite what had happened, or how serious it was. But as the player was carried into a nearby building, they must have known something was badly wrong.
     How wrong was learned all too quickly; the young man died in the building he had been carried into -- his life just a brief flame that flickered and faded, despite the best efforts to aid him. His parents were on their way to the game in their car -- what sad news was waiting for them!
     But they never heard it. At the very moment the young man passed away, a car accident claimed their lives as well.
     Since then, the young man is said to wander both the structure in which he died, and the one in which he was injured, searching for his parents. Strange tales are told of seeing ghostly silhouettes and hearing loud noises (which were silenced by telling the ghost firmly to stop). One person noted recently that she wasn't frightened by the ghost as long as she had a radio playing -- and then listed at least seven places in the structure where the young man died, to which she refused to go.
     Please tell us the name by which this ghost is known, and the location of his demise.

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58. His father was prominent Republican repeatedly elected to Congress. But his dream was to play soldier: charging ahead, dispatching the enemy, being feted by the nation. In fact he was rejected by West Point because of his grades; then tried KU but left due to lack of interest.
     He fought with the Cuban rebels against the Spanish. Then after coming home, lobbied to get command of the 20th Kansas Regiment, hoping to fight along side Roosevelt in Cuba. Instead he was sent elsewhere. There he almost single-handly won a war.
     Who was he and what war did he end?

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59. Seven [Kansas City] Chiefs have been elected to the Football Hall of Fame. Can you name one? (Extra bonus points if you pick the first one elected, and even more if you can explain why!)

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60. Grasshopper Falls was renamed to what, and for what reason? Further, what is this municipality currently called?

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Hints

Trivia Question #50: This church is no longer a Methodist Church and its original color (i.e., ______ Church) became the name for the community in Wyandotte County where it stands.

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Trivia Question #57: The structure in which the young man is said to have died became the home of "The Purple Masque." You can head to the Flint Hills to visit the ghost -- west of Silver Lake on US24, past the Windmill, to Kansas' "Little Apple."

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